Marlin Firearms Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I received my Remlin 1894 SS back from the service center and decided to break it down completely and give it a good cleaning and polish some of the bearing surfaces. I took the forearm cap off to to remove the magazine tube and forearm. Upon reassembly, the forearm cap would not go back in place for anything. It was a full hole off until I squeezed the magazine tube and barrel together to get it to line up. This took almost all the strength I had to hold it in this position and there was no way I was getting the screws started with one hand. Is there something I am doing wrong? Do I need to sand some off of the forearm to allow better fit?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,272 Posts
By your description you are doing it right. I used one of those one handed clamps with the rubber pads and squeezed it all back together then started the screws. I was like you and couldn't hold it and start the screws at the same time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,303 Posts
When installing forecap screws try placing a punch or similar tool in the swivel stud hole. You can manipulate the punch to line up the cap holes with the tenon threads.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,007 Posts
BobinIL said:
I received my Remlin 1894 SS back from the service center and decided to break it down completely and give it a good cleaning and polish some of the bearing surfaces. I took the forearm cap off to to remove the magazine tube and forearm. Upon reassembly, the forearm cap would not go back in place for anything. It was a full hole off until I squeezed the magazine tube and barrel together to get it to line up. This took almost all the strength I had to hold it in this position and there was no way I was getting the screws started with one hand. Is there something I am doing wrong? Do I need to sand some off of the forearm to allow better fit?
First 1894C I bought back in the '80s was like that. The only thing I can think of is that the wood was bone dry when they fitted it and it absorbed moisture and swelled while sitting on the shelf after. I have had some poorly fitted forearms where the holes in the hanger were actually stripped from the factory, the threads on the screws weren't in good shape, either. Those guns took some careful fitting with inletting gold and a fine cabinet-maker's file, plus new hangers and screws. If you take too much off and go where it's dry, the wood shrinks and you've got a loose forearm. If it's too tight, you'll end up with buggered screws when assembling and maybe a stripped hanger. I've got mine fitted so that a close-fitting punch will pass through and line things up, then I can start a screw on the one side, pull the punch out, start the other and tighten down on both. There's also been a change over the years in the hanger, they made a "discount" version that was a square "U" of thin strip stock instead of a forging or casting. I prefer the forged or cast units and have retro-fitted those to replace several of the other type, they tend to have stripped threads when I see them. The dovetails in the barrels are the same size for either, just need ordinary care in fitting. Finishing the inside of the forearm and the endgrain with some Tru-oil or the like will cut down on swelling and shrinking a bit, too. Be careful with the squeezing, put a kink in the magazine tube and your follower may hang up. Kind of puzzled by your description, cap should go on BEFORE you insert the tube. If the cap's too tight, you could end up affecting accuracy from the force used. You should not have to force the forearm into place, either, it should just snap in place in back of the hanger. If you've got a really tight fit, it might be time for the inletting compound and some needle files. If you have a cap with a swivel stud, the wood isn't always relieved for the area where it's riveted, fit can be improved a lot that way by just a little work with a small chisel. Ideally, the forend cap shouldn't touch anything but the hanger and the wood.

Stan S.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,094 Posts
1894c's dont have an end cap. The simple answer is it shouldn't be that hard. if it is then things are tight & thats not good for anything. See if it fits nicely with the tube but without the wood, if it does then you should be able to determine where you need to remove wood.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top