Marlin Firearms Forum banner
1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I do a lot of camping in the mountains here in Idaho where there's generally a stream or two near-by.
I'm not much for eating Trout, but I wouldn't mind taking advantage of the opportunity, and got to thinking that catching em with flies might be fun as well as being a little easier on the fish. Like I said,,, "I don't like eating em", but I don't want to kill em either, and I find that awfully hard to avoid with spinning tackle.

Anyway,,, For the experienced Fly Fishermen/women out there,,, what would be a good choice for a beginner on a budget. I know fly fishing can get pricey, but I've got enough expensive hobbies without going overboard on another. Just want a simple little outfit to learn, and have some fun with.

FWI,,,, here's the typical stream I'll be fishing. Mostly Rainbows and Brookies up to 10".
As usual,,, TIA
Charlie

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,693 Posts
Man...are you a lucky guy...wanting to get started in fly fishing and you just so happen to live in Idaho... ;D

Yeah, a low cost outfit is definitely doable. The last fishing trip I went on with a buddy of mine out in Oregon, he didn't have his own setup but he did know how to fly fish as his brother had taught him. We bought him a rig out there and he tried to stay as low cost as possible while still getting something American made. Seemed to do the job for him just fine. I've only ever used a Scott rod and a Sage reel as it's what my dad bought me (early 90's). Not too much money but not the cheapest, either. Actually on my last trip my dad let me borrow his more pricey reel...I can't remember who made it. Definitely nice, but it didn't necessarily get the job done any better than my lower cost one...was just more of a joy to use...a luxury of sorts to have such a fine little mechanical device to toy around with all day. Sort of like the difference between carrying a Marlin XL7 afield vs. a high dollar custom Cooper or something.

Then you'll have to get a vest, a storage box for your flies...depending on the time of year and where you go you may or may not need waders. I don't know Idaho all that well, only been fishing there once...I seem to remember using waders but I'm not sure if we could've gotten away with not using them...boots, line, leaders, a good hat with lots of sunscreen, flies that are targeted for your river and any hatching of the bugs that is going on (usually can go into the local outfitter with $20 or whatever and ask them what is working on the local rivers if you don't look it up online or something...$20 can usually get you a good assortment of flies for a given time and place...then you have them for later and you build up a collection of flies over time). Just keep it simple to start and practice your technique mostly. It's all in the timing, the wrist, and getting your leader tension right. As far as getting to a good fishing spot, I know out there a lot of folks boat in, and for sure there are some places that you can only really get to with a boat. But if you man up you can definitely get it done without a boat and still get to some really nice, secluded spots. You might have to hike a good bit, and drive some rugged roads, but as I see it that's half the fun of flying fishing.

I guess it's sort of like deer hunting. You can just try to setup within 50 feet of a parking area on public land, but you'll probably enjoy it more if you put in a little work into walking, scouting, etc. If you study the rivers enough over time you'll know the best places to try. Pretty much any river in Oregon I want to go fish all I have to do is go ask my dad and he'll point out some choice spots.

There should be plenty of outfitters with lots of experience that you can talk to around your state. Might be a good idea to look around some and talk to some folks...most of those guys in the small shops really know fly fishing, from my experience...it's their life. Me I'm just an amateur that can kind of get by, and wouldn't know anything about it if it weren't for my dad's patient instruction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Ryan,,,, I wen't back and added the pic I left out of my original post. (Enjoy your short term memory while you still have it,, LOL.) :-[

As far as "getting away from the crowd" goes,,, you're preaching to the choir there my young friend.
That's why at over 60yo I still prefer a tent camp. Here's my typical camp which BTW is about 50yrds from the stream in the pic above.


Back on topic,,, I should point out that I've done a little fly-fishing, but really didn't have a clue about what I was doing, or the right gear for the task. That was pre-internet, so I just stumbled along, getting more frustrated and loosing interest untill I sold my rod and reel at a yard sale..
With all the info available these days, I'm hoping this go-round will have a little better results.

I'd be interested in hearing about the equipment you mentioned above, reguarding the entry level rod and reel your friend picked up,, and FWIW,, like your friend,, I'm pretty adament on US made even knowing that it'll probably cost more.
Thanks for the help.
Charlie
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,693 Posts
Very cool, Charlie. Sure thing, I'll see if I can get my buddy to tell me who made that set we got for him. I seem to remember trying it out one time and thinking it wasn't a bad setup.

Yeah, there's definitely a steeper learning curve to the fly fishing compared to bait casting or something like that. But the rewards of sticking with it are more than worth it. I got extremely frustrated with learning it when I was a teenager. I never really wanted to learn it back then, my dad just insisted...that probably had something to do with my frustration, but even back then I used to love bait casting fishing, fishing off a boat, deep sea fishing, etc. I didn't really start appreciating the fly fishing until I was in my late 20's. When I started getting interested in it, it sure was nice already having a lot of the technique and know-how under my belt...my dad's pretty darn good at it, probably better than I ever will be, and he spent a good bit of time teaching me over the course of a few fishing trips out West in Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, etc. He also paid for a few lessons for me with some pros. One of the things I remember one of the pros telling me about how to fling the rod is that it's just like swinging a little hatchet into a butcher block...that seemed to help a mistake I was making back then. I think another big problem I had was trying to use too much brute force. You let the rod do most of the work and are able to stay pretty relaxed when you're doing it right.

Stick with it and eventually the mechanics will be there without thinking about it...then all that is left is the enjoyment of the fishing, the river, the fresh air, the outdoors, and the beauty of God's creation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
Charlie, Ryan seems to pretty much have it down. I'd advise you start with Albright rods; pick between Albright and Ross for reels - all of these in something between 3- and 5-weight (you don't need more for 10-inch trout). There ARE other brands out there, but I've used those the most, own them now, and don't feel qualified to advise you in a different direction. (Everyone always thinks they own the best stuff, no matter what it is.) If you go with Albright, I'd stick with the A5's - those are comparable to almost any other fly rod on the market, and are a joy to cast.

Rely HEAVILY on the advice of the local fly shops. Like Ryan said, they KNOW what's going on around their neck o' the woods, and can put you on the right flies and, probably, the right places to go.

Welcome to another addiction! ;D While I am CERTAINLY no expert, I HAVE been flingin' flies since the mid-70's, and it's just about the only fishing I ever do anymore (about 3-5 days a week). Being that there are VERY few trout streams in my part of Texas - ::) - I fish mainly for bream (bluegill, red-ears, and such). I always tell people I'd rather catch a 10-inch bream than a 20-inch bass. ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,143 Posts
Charlie I'm glad to hear you want to start throwing flies, it's easy to pick up and on the small creeks it doesn't take much skill. I've creek fished with flies since I was a boy and it also doesn't take much for equipment. I still use a Shakespear Ugly Stik fly rod, no it's not too fancy, it's tough as nails and it works though, won't break the bank either. I use an old Pflueger fly reel and cheap fly line, I carry a grand total of three different flies in my fly box. I carry size 10 Royal Wolfes, size 10 elk hair caddis, and size 10 Joe's hoppers, nothing more. Yes there's hundreds of others that will work but if you can't catch fish in places like you and I go with those three there probably aren't any fish in the first place...grin. I seldom get past the royal wolfe and wear them out from catching fish, no real long leaders are needed either, get a small spool of leader material in about 4 pound test and go to town. Stalk the fish the same way you stalk game and just plop the fly on the water where your experience tells you it should go and you'll do just fine old friend, I'd bet the farm on it. I'll gladly show you what I mean after the weather warms up if you're interested. I've been meaning to come over that way and hammer on the smallies anyhow. Keep me posted.

Jesse
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,143 Posts
Charlie another thing comes to mind too and that is if you go with an Ugly Stik you can get a low mount spinning reel and use it for bait fishing too. That combination is one of my all time favorites for bait fishing even in the larger rivers for everything except salmon and steel head.

Jesse
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
w5cds,,,,, Thanks for the input. although 550.00 MSRP. the A-5's more than a little out of my price range.

Jesse,,,,, Good to see you over here and thanks for chiming in. Didn't know that they made the Ugly Stick in a fly rod. They're definitely tough as nails. I'll have to dig into them a bit. And thanks for the advice on the Flies, that's exactly the info I'm looking for.
I'm finding out that just like every thing else these days it's virtually impossible to find reasonably priced US made equipment. I have discovered though, that there's a few small companies out west that are buying carbon blanks (probably imported) and building their own rods. I'm looking pretty hard at "Yellowstone Fly Company" and "Ottos". Ottos has a nice little 4 weight in the length I'd like so right now their the front runner. Reels seem to be a toss up, and since one of our local sports shops that's always done me right carries Okuma at a fair price, I'll probably pick up my reel and line from them.

My Gopher shootin buddy who does allot of Fly Fishing is supposed to stop by today for a beer so I can pick his brain. He's pushing me hard towards Reddington's package deals and I gotta admitt they're tempting, but I looked at em at a local shop and MAN are they fugly... :p
I'll spend the weekend shooting Gophers and digesting everything I "think" I know and probably pull the trigger on some gear next week. It's been raining pretty much non stop for the last couple weeks making the streams and rivers are a muddy mess so I've got plenty of time.

Thanks again everyone, and keep em coming.
Charlie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
One more quick question ( well for now ).
Two piece or four piece rods?
From my Bass fishing days, I've always leaned towards two piece or even better,,, one piece rods. The guy at the local sport shop agrees, but my buddy says that rods are so advanced these days that it doesn't matter.
Gotta admitt that the four piece would sure be easier to transport, but since I'm not looking to do allot of back-packing or the like, I'd sacrafice the convienence of the four piece for better action and more strength. Or,, is this a moote point for a guy with a skill level of zero? :-\
What do ya'll use?
Thanks again.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,693 Posts
My dad and I both use four piece, I've never had a problem with them. Of course I travel via airplane a lot when I go fly fishing, so I really need the compactness.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
271 Posts
MyDogsHunt,

Go on the Cabelas website and look for the Three Forks Fly fishing Combo. For under $100 you can get a great Rod/reel combo. I currently use the 9' 6wt 4piececombo. it came with rod, prestige reel, backing, flyline and a leader . The package also comes with a nylon four compartment bag. My son has the 8wt 2piece, and I have the 8wt 4piece coming. I use my 6wt for everything from 10" stocked browns to bluegill to perch, crappie, bass, and steelies. The difference from a 5wt to a six is significant when trying to throw a heavier fly but doesn't hamper the experience of fighting a fish. The four piece rods also breakdown to just under 30inches and can easily fit in a pack or slung over your shoulder they are out of the way.

I also have 2 5wts of different manufacture. One is 7.5' the other 8.5'. I like the longer rods for better reach, greater line control and higher back casts to keep your line up off the grass.

Another great resource is Fly Anglers online. The site has a great archive and hours of great reading.

Good fishing,
Vince
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,143 Posts
Charlie for no particular reason I've always used the two piece rods, but I seem to remember having a pack rod back in the day too. I've considered picking up a couple of pack rods for Catherine and I but I've not seen what I'm looking for yet. I like the idea of being able to carry two reels and one rod to do all the fishing that I might care to do, that's why I'm partial to the low mount type spinning reels to go with an extra tough fly rod...smile. I don't know how many hours I've spent bait fishing with that combo but it's plenty also throwing hardware. If you could combine that concept with a nice pack rod you'd be in tall cotton old friend. I've been wanting to go out and start shooting gophers here too but it looks like I'm going to be down to one day off per week now maybe for the rest of the month. If Monday looks good those little buggers are in trouble though....grin. If you get up here this spring let me know and be sure to throw in your 22, we'll see about murdering a pile of the little beasts....lol.

Jesse
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,098 Posts
If you ever go anywhere in an airplane you will appreciate the 4 piece.

+1 +1 +1 on the Ross reels - I own about 15 reels and at least 10 are Ross. Great company, great products.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
MyDogsHunt said:
w5cds,,,,, Thanks for the input. although 550.00 MSRP. the A-5's more than a little out of my price range.
Sorry about that! Last time I looked at their prices (a few months ago), they were WAY cheaper than that! I bought a TW rod and matching Bugati reel as a Christmas gift for my brother last year, and spent $100 + s/h on both! The A5 rods were only around $160, IIRC. Don't blame you for looking for less expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,059 Posts
I have a Redington 4 piece that cost about $150. Casts as nice as rods twice the price. The local fly shop owner had me try the Redington a Sage, and an Orvis (Both $450+) in his parking lot.

Plays fish very well too.

He was selling a lot of those Redingtons before he closed up shop and retired. They work great on small creeks and on large streams. Love mine. Plus the lifetime warranty is worth considering.

Because of all the wind in Colorado, I use a weight forward taper line so I can get some good casts on larger streams when the wind picks up..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hipshot said:
Buy the cheapest reel you can find--------all it does is store your fly line and backing.-----That is if you are only going to use it for Brookies and small rainbows.

Hip
That what I'm hearing from most folks.
Ross has a nice package deal on their ready to fish reels but they don't sell em online and the dealers I found on their website in my area are pretty flakey. They're either never there, or the people that are there can't answer my questions and tell me to call back when so and so is there ?
Getting tired of shopping so I think I'll go down to the local shop I like and pick up one of the Okuma's they sell for forty bucks and be done with it. Probably order a rod from Ottos in Colorado. I've given myself a budget of 150.00 and should be just under that after getting some good line.
Thanks
Charlie
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,693 Posts
Cool, sounds like a good plan. My buddy that I mentioned earlier is out of the country and can't check to see what he has for a while, but it sounds like you've figured it out :) Let us know when you catch your first fish with your new setup!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
??? Still shopping LOL ???

Just found this outfit.
I mentioned earlier that a trusted friend and avid flyer recommends Redington as a good piece for beginners, which seems to mirror allot of stuff I've read.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=310306930606+&item=310306930606
With the "free" (yea right) shipping, it's just a tad over my budget. The protective tube/covers a plus, and every thing's there and ready to fish.
It's a two piece, but I actually prefer that since there's zero chance of me taking it on a plane and I don't even own a back-pack. Like I said,,, "I just want to do a little fishing in the streams around the places where I go camping.

What do ya'll think???
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top