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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, everybody -

I received the new stock for a 336 I,m refiishing. I got the stock fitted on the tangs and my question is: do you sand with the stock on the rifle to get the correct height in the the tang channel and where the wood meets the receiver? Wouldn't sanding with it attached remove the bluing?
 

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You are so right you have to remove the stock from the gun then sand it. It for sure would remove the bluing. You can mark the wood on the inside of the tang with a marker. Remove the wood to the top of the mark then start sanding from there. Careful not to take to much wood off. Once you get to the top of the mark stop removing wood and start sanding for final fit. Always be careful not to remove to much wood as you can't put it back once it is removed. You can put the stock back on and check it from time to time to make sure you don't take to much off.

Enjoy the Journey
444GS2
 
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Mark a line with a fine tipped marker to allow you to slowly sand down the wood around the tangs! Definitely do not sand with the stock on the rifle! When you get to the final fitting, you might use blue masking tape over the tang for the final fitting. If you have it fitted on the tangs, you've got the hard part done -- now the trick is to have patience grasshopper! Looking forward to pictures! John
 

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I would have weapon completely torn down, cover all the rear edges and tangs of receiver with foil tape. Trim first application with razor laying flat to metal, add several more trimming every layer. Usually about .003" thick, I like to layer to about .020" leaving wood slightly proud when finished, your weapon- you're call. Tighten stock bolt as if you were done with it, and sand away. DO NOT BE IN A HURRY, you will regret it!
 

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Use a sanding block to back up the sandpaper, this will keep the lines nice and straight. They can be a block of wood, a big pink eraser, a piece of yard stick, use whatever fits the particular
area being sanded. Take off a little wood then try it for fit. Work the entire length of the contour, not just the edge. Like everyone else said, be patient. Best of luck with your project.
 
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deerslayer, folks have already covered most of the things I would tell you. Best advise I could give now is to have patience and go slow, you can always take off more wood, but hard to put it back on. Don't ask how I know that gem of wisdom. Take care, good work so far and pictures of the finished Marlin, John.
 

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Good project. If you haven't already thought of this, you might consider leaving the wood a 1/16th or so 'proud' of the metal, in case a further refinishing were ever called for..

Regards,

Dyson
 

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Good project. If you haven't already thought of this, you might consider leaving the wood a 1/16th or so 'proud' of the metal, in case a further refinishing were ever called for..

Regards,

Dyson
I am thinking leave proud too. 1/16" might be too much and invite damage catching things. I am thinking 1/2 that much, 1/32" or 0.030"
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the great advice, everyone!! I started sanding and fitting this morning. Going pretty well so far. I'm definatlely not a woodworker or an expert. I can see now what you mean by having patience. This will be a slowwwwww project. Hopefully it will be done by the november deer season.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So I used some inlet black to help the process along and it really helped. Not quite professional, but I am pleased so far. The forearm won't match perfect since it is used and the stock is new. It is sanded to 150 grit right now and I need to install the bullseye and sling stud. Not sure what to finish it with, but I am leaning towards boiled linseed oil.

I am really liking this gun. ATT_1396705721214_image.jpeg ATT_1396705661011_image.jpeg ATT_1396705715014_image.jpeg
 

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I leave the wood on the gun when doing the close to metal work. Thing is I use two layers of tape, next to the metal I use electrical tape, above that I use clear. Once I cut the clear I know I'm close enough and prefer to leave the wood that amount proud above the metal.

On my older well handled guns with not much bluing I leave the wood on and use one layer of clear tape. Not worrying about touching the metal. One in particular that had a lot of rust I did not use any tape at all, sanded it till the wood met the metal.
 

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Looking good, I know how slow a careful sanding project can be.
 

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