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Greetings all. This is a first post for me and I thought I would take my question to the experts directly. I have dilemma on my hands. I own a first year 1894c in .357. It has been in my family since purchased residing in a safe. I would say it has a <200 round count through it (more like 150). It is a beautiful firearm. Every once in a while I get it out to wipe it down and consider selling it to fund another project. However, once I work through the action, get a feel of the rifle, etc. I replace it to its case and it goes back into the safe. My question is if I were to sell this, what value does first year production have and since we will be at the 40 anniversary in a little over a year, what does that do to sit on it another 13 months? I saw a listing on Guntrader active now for a SS model that is fetching $1,600+ in bids! I am on the fence here. Looking for reasons why to hold (great firearm/sentimental value) and why to fold ($$$), Thanks, Dan
 

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After logging in just to reply to your post.........Welcome to MO's........

My advise....from a guy that has a 'few' Marlins.....keep it...especially a family owned rifle....

They are not making rifles like that any more.....it will not fetch the SS pricing.......

Keep it........shoot it....maintain it.........

The Fed's are printing US currency every day..........

PS............you know we wanna see some pics of the 'ole girl........:laugh:
 

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I would also keep it, but I have sold many a gun to buy my kids Christmas, or pay doctor bills when needed... at that point as nice, and wonderful as they are they are just a tool which can be replaced. I have also sold some guns because I thought I just didn't need them sitting around, or I didn't shoot them enough etc.. some of those I really regret.

Value is hard to tell, we all love pictures tho, and a first year production 1894c would be nice to see. If it were new with box unfired I'm guess you could add 30% to current completed prices on gunbroker, being fired which has not done any harm at all to this gun, but for collectors it makes a difference. I'm going out on a limb here... I'm probably wrong, but maybe add 10% to current completed gunbroker auctions... if you can find a collector/shooter. If someone is just looking for a 1894c to use in cowboy action, or hunt with it will probably just sell for current price considering how nice a shape it is in, wood/grade and finish. I hope this helps, and take what I say with a grain of salt... there are people on this forum with much more knowledge than me that will hopefully chime in.
 

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Hi, and welcome to the forum, from N Florida. Keep the rifle. It will never loose its value, most likely increase. I'm not smart enough to give advise here, so, I'll just give my opinion. Don't put too much stock on prices you see on auction sights. I have no personal experience with Gunbroker. What I have seen on other auction sights is, sellers will sometimes bid on their own property (or have someone else do so for them) to drive the price up. This will give buyers a false impression of what the item is worth. They will then relist the item with different pictures and different description.
 

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Welcome aboard. Being a first year example means little to most people, condition is more important. Also the stainless models command much higher prices as they were made for a very short time, whereas the blued models are fairly common. Unless you have to sell I would keep it.
 

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I have no idea what your rifle is worth, what it looks like or if you still have the box and papers.
Locally, there is one online purported to be 99%, JM, pre safety that has consistently failed to sell for $899 (I assume no box and papers).

Hey, Christmas is just around the corner, and 2017 Income Tax refunds will be beginning in the next 60-90 days... so you never know - that one may sell tomorrow.
 

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Welcome to the forums

I have one of those that I inherited from my uncle and I wouldn't sell it for anything. For the last several years my kid has been using it for hunting season so its picked up a bit of woods character as I like to call it (a few scratches/dings here and there in the wood).

As for value, locally I saw one of the Marlin pre safety .357s sell for around 750 last year.
 

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All kinds. Enamored of their mechanisms!
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If, when you pick it up, it brings you joy to hold, and have fond memories of it, you will regret, perhaps even rue the day of parting with it. Regret is a destructive emotion. As a bonus, it is not only a rare bird, it was made by good union folks who worked hard to get in a union and were damn proud of their creations! AC
 

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Welcome from SW Ohio.

You have a very desirable rifle. It's yours to do with as you wish. However, you are not ever likely to be able to replace it. Certainly not for what you would sell that one for.

Personally I would take a second job delivering pizzas to fund a project before I would ever sell that rifle.
 

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I would not part with my 1894c for $1600. It was made in the last year, or nearly so, of the JM production. It works well, but the action is stiff and gritty—not nearly as smooth as an Henry. It is accurate, though. It shoots where I point it, every time I pull that trigger. There is no reason strong enough to make me sell it. It is just too good to let it go.
 

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Welcome to the forums! As stated above already, your rifle would not bring what the stainless ones sell for. Maybe a slight premium for first year and mint condition but that only matters to a die hard Marlin collector. Many folks just want one to shoot so date of manufacture doesn't mean much to the average shooter. If you must sell it I would think anywhere from $800-1200 would be the range it would fall into. An auction setting could bring the higher end but you will have fees involved. A classified is often free but then you must post a price. Personally, if it were mine and I was forced to sell it I would list it for $1100 OBO.
 

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Welcome from WNC!!

My Dad had a total of three guns. One, a Model 99 Arisaka with mum that he brought back from the Pacific in WWII. The second, a model 101 Marlin, 1970 mfg and a 38 snub nose pistol, a Rossi. He was not a gun guy per se. He gave me the 99 as a youth and I killed my first deer with it. The Model 101 I shared with my brother as he got none of his guns. I still have the Rossi and pick it up every now and then just to know his hands were on it.

Back to the 99. While I was overseas in the late 60's a lot of my possessions disappeared, including this rifle. I was fortunate enough to replace it with one in very similar, maybe even better condition, about twenty years ago.

To sum it up, I still have memories of him with the 99, I can shoot the 101 anytime, and the Rossi I can hold. Once they are gone, they are gone. Some firearms are investments, some I choose to share with family and the Rossi is priceless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the welcome and feedback. Here are some pics...

........PS............you know we wanna see some pics of the 'ole girl........:laugh:[/QUOTE said:
Thanks all for the warm welcome and words of wisdom. I figured there would be a loud "hold" voice as a common theme in these responses. And rightfully so. Here are some pics of my 1894c...
20171207_163311_Film1.jpg 20171207_163125_Film1_resized.jpg 20171207_163144_Film1_resized.jpg 20171207_163150_Film1_resized.jpg 20171207_163443_Film1_resized (002).jpg
 

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Here's how you can decide. Since it's already been shot, it's not NIB any more.

Go buy you a box of .357 magnum jsp's, a box of 38 specials and gather up some cheap 2 liter sodas, and empty tin cans. Take the 1894c out somewhere that you can plink - not a range where you can only poke holes in paper.

After exploding the 2 liters and chasing around the tin cans if you don't have a ear-to-ear grin that won't go away for a couple of days, then post 23 more times on this forum and offer it for sale.

I imagine you'll decide to keep it instead! :)

ps: I have a 1894c pre-safety that I spent 20+ years looking for. I paid $600 for it. Since I have one, I probably wouldn't pay more than $600 for my next one no matter what condition.
 

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Picked up my first year 1894 .357 mag up for 700 last year and that was a good price for this area. Most 1894c or 1895 357 mags seem to be selling over $900. 1894css are unobtainium, and it you find one are 1500 and up.

My wife would skewer me if I paid that much for a gun.
 
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