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Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinking I'd like to get a traditional bow. I've got an old compound, but it is starting to who its age, getting hard to keep in tune. I've looked at the new compounds, but buying one is like getting into an arms race. I don't like the prices or the continual one-upmanship. It shouldn't be about the equipment, it should be about the shot.
There is a shop here in town with alot - a couple dozen, maybe - of traditional bows. I don't know them well enough to completely trust their qualifications or motives.
So, do I look for? I'll want to shoot for fun alot, and hunt a little.
I guess I'm asking for Traditional Archery 101.
 

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I can't help but I'm also interested so I'll follow along. Thanks for the thread, I need to get started soon in this new to me portion of hunting. Anything that gets me out in the field more is good stuff and I'm more interested in a long bow than a compound. It's not a price thing just a preference since I know that good long bows can go for as much if not more than a compound.
 

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Well this is gonna be ah pretty long post and the wifes already standin at the door so I want you boys to start thinkin on one thing.
Most compounds have ah 50 -85% let off so holdin ah #50 compound at 80 % you only holding a 10# recurve or long bow.
Many of us traditional hunters are over bowed. It think its ah man thing but it's ah bad thing when it come ta accuracy.
others come on here to and have ah lot ah good things ta say. I'll be back later, welcome to the club. Dont buy anything in ah hurry. :)
 

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Ah example would be Fred Eichler. Quite ah sucessful bowhunter he is. He shoots I think ah #50 pound bow and has spent many years building up his form and skills. Hes no small litte feller. Could he draw ah lot more? I'm sure he could but why??
I think it was old G fred Asbell that said if every bow ever made was set at #45 pounds and just marked what the customer ask for. We sure would have ah lot better shooters out there. ;)
Now in ah perfect world ah man would go out and buy ah used yard sale or even used at the sport shop 35-40 pound recurve or longbow and start learnin his form. The learning curve would be ah lot faster and the chance of developing bad habits that are hard ta get rid of or maybe even cursed with for life
would be ah lot less. During the time your doin this you can try and find others in your area that are into traditional and get with em. Most would be glad ta talk yer ear off. Maybe even go to some shoots just ta see what these folks are up to.
Weather you in the end decide ta buy ah huntin weight recurve or longbow thats ah personal thing and I'm not gonna try and steer ya either way.
Now I know that some folks just cant bring theirself ta buy ah bow just to learn on then buy their huntin bow. I think that is the best way to go but some times money is ah factor other reasons. If you find ah light weight bow for cheap you can always sell it when you done. Or ah recurve or three piece longbow that you can order higher limbs for after learnin how ta shoot
If money is ah factor I'm willing to help with something I have laying around in light poundage as long as ya send it back when your done so I can do the same for others.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So, I'm thinking of a light bow to learn on. Thinking.

In the mean time, what other kit will I need.

Looking at used bows, what do I look for to tell a diamond in the rough from a peice of crab.
 

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Make sure the bow dont have twisted limbs. This is more common in recurves than longbows. It most often comes from not using ah stringer.
With the bow strung just look down the limbs and if theres much of ah twist you will see it. Second make sure it dosent have any cracks or big chips in the wood. As far as price run it by us and check and see what there sellin on ebay for. For just starting out I would recomehd ah recurve of no less that 58" or ah longbow no less that 62". Also you will need ah glove or tab, a arm guard, proper spined arrows, and ah quiver.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
How is the length beneficial?
Besides the obvious, what is the difference - in use, function, or utility - between the longbow and the recurve.
Arrow spine is a measure of stiffness, correct? How does one tell what is "proper."
Thanks a lot for the info so far.
 

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The longer bows seem for most folks ta be more forgiving. The shorter the bow the more finger pinch you will get. That has ah lot ta do with the persons draw length. A man with ah 30" draw is most likely not gonna be comfortable shooting a 56" recurve. I only have ah 27" draw and ah the 58 and 62 are as short as I personally would buy. These are not hard rules I'm only speaking for me.
The choice between ah longbow and ah recurve is mostly personal. I would say quality of construction bein the same the recurve is faster but ah little noisier. That has just been my experience. Heres some thoughts from Dale Karch and Tred Barta on some differences.
http://www.versuscountry.com/the-best-and-worst-of-tred-barta/videos/long-bow-vs-recurve/
As far as spine yes it is the stiffness. The spine you need will depend on many different things. How far the bow is cut to center, draw length, draw weight, tip or head weight. All these things and others affect what spine will work best. If you buy ah bow we can help you figure out what spine ya need.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, that video was helpful.
 

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I have a 1973 Martin Firecat Compound I have been shooting since I bought it new in '74 but always loved my old traditional recurves. Got rid of my 50+ pound recurves and bought this nice little Ragim 18# 62 inch bow and I love shooting it in the back yard. Excellent way to perfect the proper shooting form cause there is almost no stress to deal with. I can hold full draw for 30 minutes if I have to! You can shoot it all day and not get tired - - - The bow riser is all hardwood so I sanded it all down smooth and painted it all gloss black. Paid $75 for it at local bow shop.


 

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Both those bows look real nice. That firecat some how puts me in the mind of trad stuff even though it's ah compound. I remember those and always liked em. Martin make real good trad bows. I love my Savannah longbow. I have owned ah Martin Hunter and X-200 recurve but some how just keep commin back to the longbow.
 

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helpful thread, thanks! I just got a letter in the mail from DFW today that I got drawn to purchase a multiple season deer tag if I choose to do so. that would mean that I could hunt any of the seasons here, archery, muzzleloader or modern firearm. I still only get one deer tag, and whatever season I am hunting I need to use the equipment for that season. Normally in WA, you have to choose your weapon type when you buy your tag. So I have the option of bowhunting or ML, too. I've done a bit or archery when I was younger, but haven't looked at it in years. All the macho, super high tech compound bow stuff is a turn off for me, so now I'm thinking of trying to find a more traditional set of archery gear.
 

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Well I found a bow I really like and ordered it today. Should arrive on Friday. I will take pictures and post - I would like to have gotten a fancy wood riser but anything of quality cost way more than I can put into it right now. Details and pictures to follow.


GB45
 

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Were watin. ;D
 

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I'm your Huckleberry, got a 52" Fedora 1pc for sale. 45#@29.5, should be bewtween 40#-42# at 28", still legal. Very efficient little bow.
 

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Almost forgot to post the new bow pictures - - - - - shoots fantastic.

Before you guys freak out on the HARDWARE let me say I shoot her straight up without sights and stabilizer in TRADITIONAL MEETS or a simple thumbscrew to install the sight and screw in the stabilizer for OLYMPIC STYLE MEETS. We have both at the local indoor range.

Bow is manufactured by WIN-WIN one of the top bow makers in the world.

WIN WIN SF PREMIUM 25 INCH ILF RISER.


SF PREMIUM CARBON ILF LIMBS - 35 pounds.

Arrows - EASTON PLATINUM PLUS XX75 1916 weight arrows with micro target tips and small feather fletching.
Sight - Falcon Recurve Single Pin Target Bow Sight
Stabilizer - EXE Evolution

Limbs come in various sizes so using a 23 inch or 25 inch riser you can vary bow length from 62 to 70 inches.
My particular Limb and Riser combination equals 66 inch Recurve Length and 35# pull. I can hold that weight all day with no effort.
If I want to increase pull or length I simply buy a new pair of limbs. ILF (International Limb Fitting) means the limbs are made to an international standard mount so I can buy limbs from HOYT, WIN-WIN, Samick, TradTech, Morrison, and many other manufacturers and they will all fit perfectly.

I have not spent enough time at the range to tune her all up perfectly but when my arrows came in I shot all 12 inside the Red (7, 8 rings) from 20 yards and even had a couple 10s.

Let me know what you thing . . . .

GB45
 

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Win-win makes an excellant target bow, you will be pleased.

International style shooting is not as conducive to hunting as it is to target shooting. Those long limbed/handled bows can be a handi-cap in the woods. I know a lot of folks shoot 66" and 70" longbows, but they are generally canting them instead of trying to hold them perfectly vertical. Also, most hunting situations are not going to allow for perfect form as in target situations.

Gurn commented earlier on most folks being overbowed. I agree to a point. Alot of folks are shooting more then they need, but I also find that it takes a certain level of poundage for me to get a good release (I shoot fingers with a deep hook). The bow has to be able to overcome my finger tension and cleanly pull the string from my glove, and anything under 50# hangs up on the release. I also want to see my arrow stuck in the ground on the other side of any critter I shoot at, and believe that 50# is a minimum for whitetail sized game.

For hunting purposes, I'd recommend a newcomer to buy a lighter target bow, then work up to a #45-#55 recurve in the 58"-60" range (depending on their physical stature and draw length, might go a little shorter or longer) Short bows are hard to shoot well, and longer bows shoot well but are harder to handle in a tree stand/ground blind.

Learn with the more stable design of a recurve, the swap to a longbow if you wish. I love my longbows, but my recurves are definately easier to shoot well.
 

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Here are a couple links for you 1R and these are for the Samick Sage recurve. I personally haven't used or even seen one of these but I understand they are a very excellent entry level bow. SOme seem to really like them above the higher priced manufactured or custom shop bows. You can get different limbs for different poundage of pull. I hope this is helpful.


http://www.3riversarchery.com/Power...490X-Sage-No-Tools-Take-Down-Recurve-Bow.html

http://www.3riversarchery.com/Bows+Recurves+Samick+Sports_c44_s155_p313_thumb.html
 

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Samick does make good bows at a great price point for beginners. I shot some Samick recurves before I decided to get my Win-Win which cost more than double the Samick bows but I am not exactly a beginner in the target shooting sense. I have never hunted with a bow except for bow fishing in Florida - did that almost every week before we moved up here to North Carolina 17 years ago.

I agree that hunting bows need to be shorter but I do shoot standing straight up with bow perfectly perpendicular to the ground - or as close to perpendicular as I can get it! I have not gone to using a target level yet - don't know that I ever will - consider that to be almost cheating but a lot of good shooters use them.

GB45
 

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+1 on Gurn's statement, most of us start out over bowed (I think that is what he said) my first bow as a Bear Grizzly at #60, the ol' He Man complex took over. While I thought is was nothing to draw and shoot that bow it did get a bit exhausting at about the 16 arrow point. So I throttled her back to a #50 on a Bear Montana Long Bow and I can shoot all day long. I read another forum somewhere and an older gentleman who has been shooting traditional for years uses either a #45 of #50 bow and his advice was simple; get as close as you can and make sure your broadheads are very sharp. Good advice as far as I am concerned. You will love shooting traditional though, it is fun and challeging especially if you are use to pin sights.
 
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