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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got back from the range and I started cleaning my 1897T. This gun has about 2000 rounds through it now and I noticed that the firing pin is striking the top edge of the rim of the chamber. This has also left a mark on the top edge of the firing pin. My concern is that this will cause extraction problems in the future due to the ding that it has left on the rim of the chamber. Has anyone noticed this on their 1897T's or 39A's? What do you do about it? If I have to send this rifle back to Marlin one more time....... :x :x :x
 

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Ringo wrote:
Have you been dry-firing your Marlin?
:shock: :shock: :shock:

They should NOT be dryfired. The firing pin will impact the edge of the chamber resulting in the damage you describe. Get a set of snap-caps for dry firing. I don't think you can blame it on Marlin if you have been dry firing it. My manual states pretty clearly not to dry fire. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I do not intentionally dry fire the rifle. However, under normal shooting you are bound to dry fire the rifle after the last round unless you count every time. That kind of dry firing seems like normal "wear and tear" to me. If the rifle is not designed to withstand that kind of use then the design is poor. Otherwise they need to engineer a way to prevent you from pulling the trigger on an empty chamber. In my opinion, the damage is the result of a firing pin that is too long. Dry firing may cause the firing pin to break, but it should never cause chamber damage.
 

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When I know I'm getting close to the end of the ammo, I watch for the red tip of the magazine plunger to appear in the little window.
 

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K9Medic wrote:
Dry firing may cause the firing pin to break, but it should never cause chamber damage.
I always thought that the firing pin was made of a harder steel than was the barrel. By it's function it (FP) has to withstand more direct impact than does the barrel. Barrels are made of a softer grade of steel. The firing pin is hit by the hammer on one end and has to impact the cartridge rim against the chamber on the other. Of course my opinion is just that, my opinion and I will defer to the more knowledgeable here about. The one thing I know is that I have no such damage to any of my rimfires because I am very careful not to allow the firing pin to impact an empty chamber. JMHO of course and YMMV. :) PS: I'm sorry your rifle is damaged. Does it still function OK?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Chuckles,

The rifle still functions fine. I am concerned however that if this problem worsens then I will start having extraction problems. I agree with you that the problem cannot occur if the rifle is not dry fired. But as I stated before, dry firing usually causes the firing pin to break but it should not cause (IMO) a ding on the chamber rim. I think the ding is a result of the firing pin being too long causing it to protrude too far from the bolt face. I may be wrong about that and that is my reason for the post, to gain more knowledge. Dry firing caused firing pins to break because the inertia of the firing pin traveling forward and striking steel rather than brass causes the harder more brittle metal to break. I still maintain that the chamber striking is a factory tolerance and quality control problem. But don't get me started on Marlin's lack of quality control. This rifle has already been back to the factory twice. Don't get me wrong, I love this rifle now primarily because of the memories that are already attached to it. I hate the fact that the rifle has to return to the factory two (maybe three) times to be right.
 

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firing pin damage

the firin pin can indeed cause this damage in rimfires and fortunatly there is a tool you can order from brownell,s that will "iron out "a chamber so damaged as to cause extraction problems or if you don't trust yourself a gunsmith can fix it without much layout but the best way is to use snapcaps when dryfiring, this is the only time this ahould be occuring .if it's happening while shooting youve got to check your firing pin protrusion witha guage and adjust it... carefully, you can't put metal back shootrj2003
 

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k9Medic said:
I do not intentionally dry fire the rifle. In my opinion, the damage is the result of a firing pin that is too long.

Hi k9Medic........... I've been away for the weekend so I couldn't get back to you 'til now.

I tend to think you are correct about the length of the pin being too long.
~ The pin on my 1897-CB is almost too short!
It makes just a slight crease in the rim of the cartridge and yet I've never once had a misfire. Go figure.....

If you can not acquire a good 'smith (one that really knows what he's doing) then, as much as I know how you don't want to send her in for a third time, you should have Marlin make the fix.

Good luck to you.......
 

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Technically your firing pin is not too long, but rather the stepped portion of the tip is too wide. The end of the firing pin that makes contact with the case should not be wide enough to strike the edge of the chamber. A little material can be removed until it clears the edge, but still strikes the edge of the case.
This operation must be done carefully or it wont hit the rim of the case, and ignite the cartridge. Shouldn't be a problem to do this with normal tools such as a machinist file, but take a small amount, and then check it. Deburr the edge of the chamber first, and then take off only the amount you see that it hits.
If you don't feel comfortable doing this, then you may have a smith, or Marlin do it.
A second option is to relieve the area that the firing pin hits, but this involves removing the barrel, and should be left to a gunsmith.
Hope this helps.
 

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I'm with Marlinman on this. 8) My 1897T only has about 1000 rounds through it :lol: and is working flawlessly, but I'll keep my eyes open. as for the last round , not counting, dry-firing, well, it happens and you have to live with the consequences. If it only happens one time out of every 14 shots it shouldn't be too bad. How about inserting a fired case last into the magazine tube so that the last round is a dud, but you would have the firing pin striking the already fired case. No bang, but no firing pin hitting the chamber rim either. How about it, would that work? :?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you all very much for the feedback. I think I will try to smooth the chamber myself and maybe work the firing pin a little. Luisyamaha, I like your idea about using the fired case if it will feed properly. Anyway, thanks again all.
 

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k9Medic said:
Luisyamaha, I like your idea about using the fired case if it will feed properly.
My first thought would be that it would not feed.
But now I might have to give it a try....
 

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I haven't tried the fired case idea yet either. Not yet. If it feeds into the chamber you get a dud. If it doesn't feed into the chamber, at least you know you got to the end of your live cartridges and stop and reload without firing on an empty chamber. The carrier should pick it up as it is designed to work with different lenght cartridges (short, long, long rifle) but it might not feed into the chamber due to the lack of the rounded tip of the bullet. If they feed and chamber blanks it should also do the empty shell.
If anybody tries it before me, please let us know. 8)
 
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