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OMG congratulations! I can only imagine the joy and excitement you must be feeling to take that huge moose with the almighty 45-70 and after 20 years of waiting
 

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I've been applying for a moose tag in Maine and New Brunswick for 20 years. Finally, after all these years, I was selected for a Maine bull moose tag. I didn't get the best week (the rut) nor the best area for taking a Maine moose but I was grateful for the long-awaited opportunity none-the-less.

We spotted a good bull the night before the hunt and another on the road at 4am as we headed to our sector. It was 22 deg as we started our day and I was highly confident that the freezing weather, calm winds and an opening day for the area would bring me some luck. But as the first day closed I only spotted a cow with her calf before the sun had set.

On the second day as we neared our hunting area a cow jutted out on the dirt road and nearly rammed the side of the truck. We continued along but returned to that area at daybreak hoping that a bull may have still been attending the cow despite the fact that the rut had past. This time luck was on our side as we relocated the cow which was in a clear-cut with two bulls. We let the smaller bull walk as we tried to close the distance on the larger bull. As I approached within 100yds the bull started to walk away and it was now or never.

Hoisting up my 1895SBL I let a 402gr Hammer bullet fly. You could hear the big bullet slap the bull hard but he only walked faster. A second round dropped him at the shot. The bull was dead when I reached him. He took one round in the center of the lungs and another in the shoulder. My 20 year Maine bull moose hunt was finally complete. The bull was officially weighed at the check station and field dressed at 775lbs.

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Congrats on that nice looking moose. I'm from South Texas so the best I can do is hunt moose in my dreams. But I bag one every time. That really is one nice moose.
 

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Great job Charlie and a big congrats on your bull and rifle of choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
Thanks for all the comments. It really was exciting to spot that big boy early in the morning and to close the distance without spooking him. I have shot good bulls in Newfoundland but always used a 338RUM because the shots can be long. I was always hopeful that I could get a Maine moose tag where the moose are mostly in the timber and the 45/70 would be perfect.

For "Hammertime" - I was hunting in area #14 which is in the center of the state.
 

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Lucky to have taken two in Alberta. Best eating you will ever enjoy. Congratulations, I have been there.
 

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They say good things come to those who wait...well, you're proof of it! Congrats!
 

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Somebody watching over you,congrats!
 

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Congratulations! Great story too.
 

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Congrats on a great hunt!
I spent quite a bit of my life in Northern BC, and have been able to get about 15 moose over the years. I think that my experience might be worth something.
In my opinion, unless you have access to a front end loader or a similar machine, trying to move a moose in one piece is just silly. Quite some time ago it dawned on me that I can't eat a moose in one piece. It is going to need cutting up at some point, and that point I have decided, will be shortly after he is confirmed deceased. (An event that is not always readily apparent to everybody, but that is another story).

My procedure is this: First the guts out, then the hide off (so that the meat can cool properly - this will NOT occur with the hide on). Then figure out if any or all of this critter can be taken out today. If not, roll the whole skinned critter onto 4 -5 inch dia. poles to get it off the ground, and then cover up the whole thing with brush at least 3 ft thick. This will keep the ravens and other birds off the meat. Pee as much around this site as possible - this will keep the wolves and bears off, because they will suspect a trap. I have left full or partial moose carcasses out overnight in places inhabited by big wolves and grizzlies on more than one occasion with no disturbance evident when I returned the next day, except for the fact that the gut pile was gone. Then cut this moose up as follows: take the legs off, and then separate the vertebra below the last rib, and cut the head off, and take off the skull plate with the antlers. Some people break the ribs one at a time and leave the rib meat for the coyotes - who have to live too. Maybe, make the neck into one piece too.
Now there are small enough pieces to be packed out on a pack frame in several trips - hopefully more than one pack frame - but I have packed out moose all by myself.

This is time consuming, but infinitely better in my opinion, than trying to move the animal whole.
 

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How do you get 1,000 lbs of moose down from a clear-cut where quads are prohibited? On a (slightly undersized) Moose Sled, of course. It took about 3 hrs to work the bull down with lines, pulleys and the official "moose sled". LOL

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We use bigger "sledge" made from 6 mm HDPE plastic. You can find info if you search "Puuru hirvenvetolevy". Even big bulls are easy to pull to the road by atv, snowmobile or even with manpower. It glides nice and smooth over rocks, stumps and ditches. We have used it for well over a decade and pulled lots of moose with it, this on going season alone 11 so far.

One of the biggest advantages is, it protects the hide and the hide protects your meat. Only guts are taken out in the woods. Then we transport the moose to the road and forward to the "slaughter house" were we skin it and take out rest of the organs. Most important thing is you open and process the moose as little as possible in the woods. Every knife cut to the hide is another way for dirt, bacteria, etc. to enter your meat.
 
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