Marlin Firearms Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all I got a feed problem with a new 1894ss in 357, when I cycle the action it feeds and lifts the round ok but as the round is pushed forward it jams in the breech, it doesnt seem to be going in straight. there must be a good gunsmith out there!!...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am using 158gr round nose flat point bullet. But I have noticed a comment about the extractor tension being to strong...might be this. Thanks, John.
I shall work on the extractor this looks promising I have had major problems with this little darling!! I shall come back with the story on this one if I live long enough to sort it out!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,007 Posts
New to you or NIB? If NIB, old Marlin or Remlington? Apparently Remlington made some design changes in the bolt which may complicate fixing feeding problems. Original Marlins can usually be straightened out with some extractor and ejector dehorning and extractor adjustment. My .44 had some initial feeding troubles because the extractor and ejector had sharp points that dug into the cases, left deep gouges in the rims and hung up while feeding. I stoned off the sharp bits and it feeds fast or slow now and with one finger.

If you haven't done so, it's always a good idea to strip a new 1894 and detail clean it inside, removing sharp edges and burrs. Relube with your choice of mouse milks. I grease the sliding bits, oil the pivots and wax everything else. Some stock finish and wax on the inletting is a good idea if you're going to hunt with it, Marlin never finished the insides of the wood.

Stan S.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Something that I know about these rifles is that this lever action doesn't like to be functioned slowly. When I offer mine over to new/unfamiliar shooters, we're always tossing and shaking the rifle around to get the cartridge to feed because they like to look in there and watch everything happen. I tell them to rack it like you mean it. No more problems.
If you rack'em in fast, does it happen?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Something that I know about these rifles is that this lever action doesn't like to be functioned slowly. When I offer mine over to new/unfamiliar shooters, we're always tossing and shaking the rifle around to get the cartridge to feed because they like to look in there and watch everything happen. I tell them to rack it like you mean it. No more problems.
If you rack'em in fast, does it happen?
If it is properly tuned, then fast or slow shouldn't matter. But, minor issues are often overcome with fast cycling and in general aren't an actual issue.

As for the OP, how is it jamming? You say it isn't going in straight. Is the cartridge going into the chamber at an angle sideways and jamming up? If so, that's an extractor issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
As for the OP, how is it jamming? You say it isn't going in straight. Is the cartridge going into the chamber at an angle sideways and jamming up? If so, that's an extractor issue.
Yes, the tuning never seems to be the same and is the frustrating part of owning one. I have suffered with the Marlin jam. Fixed for now.
Most times when people are watching the action while cycling, they are leaning the gun to the side so they can see. That makes the bullet roll off center since its not in the grasp of the bolt. Sometimes they will feed straight in, many times they hang up on stuff.
Correct to eliminate what you can; like the crimp edge.. Good point.
I shoot SWCs and as long as I rack'em like I mean it, they never hang up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts
John,
I have experienced exactly as you have described on our two 1894C's. What others above have said about tweaking the extractor is 100% valid because that has provided some wonderful improvements on many of the other models / calibers here, but that was NOT the case with these two. My guess is there is something quite different about the chamber geometry and feed throat area in the 1894C. The leading edge of the brass continued to hang up on two sharp edges at the rear of the chamber completely unaffected by the extractor.
At the rear of the throat on the right hand side is an angled cut that provides clearance for the extractor to clear the throat and access the rim of the brass. On the back side OF THAT ANGLED CUT, at the top and bottom are two sharp edges that was regularly catching on the front of the brass. I used a Dremel and a stone to chamber off those sharp edges, and it resulted in significant improvements in chambering!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,337 Posts
I have a .41Mag I bought for $920.00. I believe the price was so because it just would not feed right. They were unloading it. The problem was a stiff extractor spring. Here are a few pics that show the jam, extractor not going over rim, the extractor with spring that needed to be straightened just a bit and a video that shows the results. Click on bottom picture.


Also have a 94C that requires my crimp to be just a bit heavy to clear the sides of the chamber origin to cycle smoothly.




 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top