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I have a 1988 vintage 336 with the original factory sights. I have skinners on all my other marlins and thought about mounting a weaver V1-3 scope on this one for something different. I mounted the scope in medium burris zee rings and the setup was too high for my tastes. I took the scope off and am back with the factory sights again.

I am wanting to be able to switch elevation easily when I go from factory jacketed loads to mild cowboy action loads using lead bullets and trailboss powder. Therefore, I may already have the perfect sight setup with the factory irons since you can easily change elevations.

My question, I know we all like to modify and tinker to get rifles set-up to our liking (including me), but how many out there just stay with the basics and use the original factory sights?

Thanks for any advice.
 

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Although almost all mine wear scopes, I have a couple set up with receiver sights. I have the rest with the factory semi-buckhorn rear blades for different power loads. Only I change out the front sights to a tritium bead. With low Weaver rings the scope comes off easy and I can use the iron sights when I want to.

If you sight it right you can change the point of impact without changing the elevator setting by just changing how fine you line up the front sight. Same technique when using a fixed rear blade on a muzzleloader.
 

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Only one.... I have a '76 336C .35Rem all factory stock. Everything else either wears a peep or glass.
 

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For my two used Marlins with straight grip I use only the standard iron sights.

On my .22 there was a small glass on it when I bought it, but I took it of.
I also experimented with a big glass on my .44, but took it of again also.

For me those rifles are good with the iron sights on 50 meters. I'm satisfied with that.
It is a bit like shooting instinctive, not everything to calculate out to the last Millimetre.
Works fine. 8)
 

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I use iron sights on all my lever guns. I have tried receiver sights and a scope or two, but I am back to iron sights. I don't say buckhorns because my favorite rear sight is the flat topped sheet metal sights on the older Marlin rifles. I also prefer the bead sight like Marlin used on the older RC carbines.

Cedar Creek
 

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I shot a small deer last year with factory sights at 100 steps. I also like peep sights but can not tell a difference in accuracy at the distances I hunt. I like the factory Marlin sights.
 

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For short range plinking open sights can be fun even with my old eyeballs. One of my favorite .22's is a pump action Rossi which cannot be scoped. I like shooting it at pop cans at 25 yards. Back when I first got my 336ADL waffle top .30-30, I shot it with the original open sights and got some very small groups at 25 yards. I have a Williams FP on it now which will allow me to shoot it at 50 and even 100 yards on a good day. But, most of my rifles are scoped.
 

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Cedar Creek said:
I use iron sights on all my lever guns. I have tried receiver sights and a scope or two, but I am back to iron sights. I don't say buckhorns because my favorite rear sight is the flat topped sheet metal sights on the older Marlin rifles. I also prefer the bead sight like Marlin used on the older RC carbines.

Cedar Creek
I've been this route myself, over the last few years and am back to using factory front & rear sights.

Peep sights are no good for me in the early morning & late evening hours... scopes are, but they take away from what I like about a good lever gun.

I've just today ordered a Marbles fiber optic front sight from Brownells.
I'll try it out on one of my Marlins to find how it does in twilight conditions.
 
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