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Fantastic article, thanks M700.
I learnt a lot reading it.
1600 lbs - that is big and very scary. I say this as these creatures are very mobile on their hind legs or on all four. Now that to me, knowing a bit about dangerous animals makes them double trouble. I appreciate the fact that they are predictable. I believe one has to have a vast knowledge of them and a load of experience to be able to read them faultlessly.

Better I don't try and rather get me a good guide or otherwise ......... !
My experience of bears stops at Teddy Bears .... a big fat ZERO.
I will go there one day to at least fish for Salmon and to hunt a moose.
Now, where is my Lotto ticket already.
:elefant::top::elefant:
 

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Hey Guy thanks for sharing!

Never seen a browny but guess you can say I walk amongst the blackies in eastern NC. I have had a few bear encounters over the years and I must agree they are truly magnificent majestic beasts! The young uns are always goofin like my 10 yr old boy, and the teens are always curious, and our big bruin, Big Nasty, well his name says it all. I am fortunate enough to also observe and admire the antics of bears. My family thinks I am twisted cuz I get excited about finding bear poop so I can inspect it closely and find the food they are eating. i have found quite a few wild food sources this way. This helped me identify more trees around the property that were providing various nuts and seeds.

I am not an expert, just also like to observe bears and their behaviors. Like I watched a big sow last year put her face on the ground like a vacuum cleaner and push along the oats and come up with them poking out of both sides of her mouth. I have a couple of buddies that come to hunt camp each year but they have strict orders NOT to shoot Big Nasty unless it is unavoidable, he walks as he is a big beast and can reach 7 feet tall with his teeth standing on hind legs.

It is also interesting how in NC the bears don't hibernate but they do move on from the agricultural part of the county to the more wooded areas during the long winter months, mostly digging stumps for grubs etc..then during the spring time they are back. another interesting thing I have noticed is that when the bears move out in the late winter, the yotes move in. the bears come back the yotes move out, an interesting cycle.

Great article and thanks for sharing, I always like to learn more about bears as I also feel like I live in their backyard when at the farm.
 

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Wow! Just the proximity in those pictures would have me at the 'ready'. ................I could hear her now telling me, 'why don't you let me hold that for you, easier to fish using both hands'. ;D

John
 

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Great write up. I consider her growing up there to be a fairy tale life that a lot of us can only dream about.
 
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Great write up. I consider her growing up there to be a fairy tale life that a lot of us can only dream about.
A very good, informative article! And, as a kid growing up, my ultimate dream was to move to Alaska. Hell...I’ve never even been there yet! Now at 65, starting over in Alaska....is”not” likely to happen! The bucket for my “bucket list” has quite a holes in it! memtb
 

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I have fly-fished for silver salmon in coastal Alaska quite a few times and we often share the stream with the big bears. They're normally pretty mellow, and willing to share the stream. Lots of salmon for us, and for the bears.

Tia mentioned in her article that sometimes the younger bears are troublemakers. Yup! They don't seem to know the rules yet and can get pretty pushy. On the other hand they're often not real confident either, which is a good thing. We have popped a few of them with rubber "bullets" from the shotgun over the years, but haven't ever had to actually shoot & kill a bear. I'm headed up there again soon on another fly-fishing trip, and hope to get some better photos of the brownies. They're pretty cool to watch.

My grizz was an "interior" or "mountain" bear, and a lot smaller than these big guys. It was a hard choice, deciding if I should go for the smaller interior grizzly, or the bigger coastal bear. I'm glad I went to the arctic and hunted the grizzly there. Got to see a whole different chunk of Alaska, which I'd never before seen.

Guy
 
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