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Discussion Starter #1
Are there any Enfield experts around here? If so, do any of you have any idea what the Enfield pictured below might be? I've attached some photos of the various markings. I can see that the stock was cut back and that it's marked as a .303 but beyond that I am confused by the dizzying array of Enfield versions. Any help is greatly appreciated.
DryMan
 

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That is a bubbafied Eddystone P14. A lot of people call them enfields but they are based off of a mauser. Good rifles! The United States also made a Pattern 17 in 30-06, and I have one. Mine is a winchester.
 

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I believe it is a model P-17. If I am correct , it was to be an upgrade of the number 1. It did not get widely accepted even though it was a very good rifle. The U.S. made them also but there was suppose to be a problem with the heat treating of the bolt and or receiver.

Andrew
 

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alawrence said:
I believe it is a model P-17. If I am correct , it was to be an upgrade of the number 1. It did not get widely accepted even though it was a very good rifle. The U.S. made them also but there was suppose to be a problem with the heat treating of the bolt and or receiver.

Andrew
P14.

There is no problem with the heat treating of the bolt or receiver unless it is made by eddystone, but it is not a safety issue.

I believe this problem is only with 1917. Workers at the Remington/Eddystone factory would crank up the heat in the furnace while heat treating to stamp on the stamps easier and the receivers were brittle. This is only an issue if you plan on changing the barrel and I do not believe it is an issue with a Pattern 14 Enfield made by Eddystone.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the info guys. Is there a distinguishing mark or 2 that you look for in classifying it as a P14? The 'ERA' stamp had led me to believe it was Enfield. Here is another picture of the action in case it tells you anything more.

One thing I am curious about -- there is a second flip up peep sight looking thing on the left hand side in addition to the normal flip up irons. What was that for? You can see it in the second picture.
DryMan
 

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Thanks for moving this Tman and sorry for posting in the wrong place. Missed this forum when I was looking at a place to post.

I did a bit of reading on the Eddystone P14 last night. Some of the descriptions label that part as a 'volley sight'? Still not sure how that would be used other than just to lob rounds at the enemy. Sign 'o the times I suppose with trench warfare being the tactic du jour in WWI?

Too bad mine is bubbafied. Would make a cool collectors piece as an early sniper's rifle. Not sure what to do with this one...
 

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Yep, volley sight. Some of the older No 1 Mk 3s had 'em, too. It was a British technique for massed volley fire. The theory was you'd use a bunch of riflemen to lob lots of rounds at an enemy position beyond the effective distance once could really get an aimed shot off, and hope to get lucky. I saw one once, it had some loooong distance markings on it.

I can't remember if the volley fire technique is to be combined with this...I think they would just use volley fire whenever they wanted to lay down some firepower quick. What you do to volley fire is not let go of the bolt handle, and as soon as you have the bolt closed, use the middle finger of your right hand (still grasping the bolt handle) to break the trigger. You trade off accuracy for speed.
 

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I just want to add to the statement on brittle Eddystone receivers on Pattern 1917 rifles. These actions are incredibly strong, and built as tough as they come. I personally have seen 458 Lotts built on these receivers, and 300H&H mags. They are very good receivers. How gunsmiths in the know would take care of the extremely tight barrels and brittle receivers, is to chuck it up in a lathe and cut about 2 thousanths off the face of the receiver and a relief on the barrel. This would make it much easier to remove the barrel without putting hairline cracks into the receiver that could become safety issues in the long run.

EDIT: Here is a good post on the whole entire issue on surplus rifle.

http://www.surplusrifleforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=116&t=364

I also want to add that I have read that some 1917 eddystone rifles rebarreled for WW2 may have the hairline cracks in the receiver ring. Upon getting an Eddystone 1917 rifle it is always a good idea to have the receiver magnafluxed. I hope this clears up any issues or mis-information that might get posted in this thread

DryMan said:
Thanks for moving this Tman and sorry for posting in the wrong place. Missed this forum when I was looking at a place to post.

I did a bit of reading on the Eddystone P14 last night. Some of the descriptions label that part as a 'volley sight'? Still not sure how that would be used other than just to lob rounds at the enemy. Sign 'o the times I suppose with trench warfare being the tactic du jour in WWI?

Too bad mine is bubbafied. Would make a cool collectors piece as an early sniper's rifle. Not sure what to do with this one...
Don't worry about putting it in the wrong place, that's what us mods are here for, to help the members get their posts in the right places so they get the proper help they need. ;D

You could try to find another stock for it, and all the right pieces. It shouldn't be too hard if you browse around. I saw where boyds was selling remakes of the 1914/1917 stocks with the top handguard and you might could check with them and see if they still offer that. All you'd have to do is get the barrel band, nose cap, and the pin that goes through that is there for god knows what reason. You could also take it to a smith and have them grind the ears off and D&T it for a scope mount, set it in a nice stock, and have a very nice hunting rifle in an exceptionally good caliber. I love the 303 brit.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Rebuilding isan interesting idea. Would certainly give me another side project to work on. Will have to think about that. I may just pass it along for someone with more skills to tackle.

Interesting info about the volley sights miatakix. Thanks for that. I always love to hear the stories that go behind these older pieces.
DrYMan
 

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About middway down the left hand side of the stock (about where yours was cut) would be the front volley sight, screwed to the side on a disc, like the big hand of a watch. Around the bottom edge of the disc would be range graduations for when the sight was raised. I've read historical accouns of advancing German troops, particularly in a desert terrain, of being "harassed" by volley fire out to 3500 yards!

An awful lot of Enfields have been "sporterised" and then used for hunting and target shooting. As interest in these old war girls, especially in the UK, has risen of late, there is a helathy business in supplying new replica furniture and reconditioned original furniture, to bring them back to specs.

The .303 Brit has often been touted as the cartridge that has taken more game than any others. (Put down to the width and bredth of the British Empire, rather than it's effectiveness!) And no doubt, anywhere in the world you can pick up a box of ammo!

It hit the papers here a couple of weeks ago that a Brit Royal Marine sniper had stalked and killed a rather skillful Taliban insurgent sniper who'd claimed several casualties. Ironically enough, the insurgent was armed with an Enfield.....
 

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Not surprising at all, the Lee-Enfield designs in general are capable of world class accuracy at long range.
 

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DryMan,

It appears that the only thing that's been chopped on is the stock. I think your gun would be an excellent candidate for rebuild. It will take some looking to find a stock and bands, etc. to get it finished but it can be done. Good Luck!

Sam
 
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