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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am cleaning up an early 94 for my stepson. The bolt was siezed up so i soaked it in PB Blaster and when i disassembled it, I noticed the firing pin was broken. I logged onto Numrich and looked at the schematic and see there is a “firing pin spring”. Where exactly does this go? I can see no spring on the bolt except the extractor, which obviously has a spring.

Part #17 on this schematic

https://www.gunpartscorp.com/gun-manufacturer/marlinglenfield/1894-series/1894-early-model
 
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I'm going to take a guess here....early 1894's (maybe even late ones?) used a two piece firing pin. The two-piece firing pin was separated towards the hammer end. Perhaps the spring is intended to be used with the two-piece firing pins?

I don't know why Numrich doesn't list the "rear" firing pin. It's kind of confusing.

I'll admit that I have an early 1984 (DOM 1902) and I've never taken the bolt apart. I could be taking out my butt because my mouth knows better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply. Comparing my two later model pre safety 94s, the firing pins move freely and independently of one another.

This one looks like it supposed to be the same but it may not be. I just dont see where that spring could go.
 

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I am cleaning up an early 94 for my stepson. The bolt was siezed up so i soaked it in PB Blaster and when i disassembled it, I noticed the firing pin was broken. I logged onto Numrich and looked at the schematic and see there is a “firing pin spring”. Where exactly does this go? I can see no spring on the bolt except the extractor, which obviously has a spring.

Part #17 on this schematic



https://www.gunpartscorp.com/gun-manufacturer/marlinglenfield/1894-series/1894-early-model
The firing pin in the early rifles models is in two pieces, a front and a rear one. Paulo is correct when he surmises that when the front and back pins are not aligned the rifle is unable to fire. The rear part of the firing pin is held down by the spring you see in the schematic. The 'L' shaped piece on the spring fits into a slot cut at the rear end of the front firing pin. The end of the spring bears down on the shaft of the rear firing pin. When the lever is closed the locking bolt pushes upwards on the rear firing pin thereby compressing the spring and because the firing pins are now aligned the mechanism is in battery and ready to fire. It is this safety mechanism that in part contributes to the name "Marlin Safety". The spring will break on occasion or gets lost in disassembly but is easy to make and replace if one can't be found on the internet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok thanks. I didn’t realize there was room in the bolt for the pin and the spring. I’ll take a closer look.
 

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I'm going to take a guess here....early 1894's (maybe even late ones?) used a two piece firing pin. The two-piece firing pin was separated towards the hammer end. Perhaps the spring is intended to be used with the two-piece firing pins?

I don't know why Numrich doesn't list the "rear" firing pin. It's kind of confusing.

I'll admit that I have an early 1984 (DOM 1902) and I've never taken the bolt apart. I could be taking out my butt because my mouth knows better.
If this is an 1894 front firing pin (it doesn't appear to be a two-piece affair, however), I probably did have the bolt apart at one time. Probably happened when I first got the rifle home from where it came. I found this a few days ago in my gun tool box when I was straightening out the work benches.





Holy cow. I have absolutely no recollection of ever having had to source and buy a new firing pin. Getting old is a terrible thing. :hmmmm2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Looks that way. Thanks!!

Ok. FYI, I figured out where the firing pin spring goes. It clips in this tiny groove and rides the front firing pin, while putting downward pressure on the rear firing pin. I will (hopefully) shoot it tomorrow. If bullets dont tumble, i will order firing pin spring and assemble it correctly. May even order a new ejector while I’m at it.



This is the rifle in question. It was a real basket case before. So much better now. Just hope it shoots with its jagged rifling.

 
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Looks that way. Thanks!!

Ok. FYI, I figured out where the firing pin spring goes. It clips in this tiny groove and rides the front firing pin, while putting downward pressure on the rear firing pin. I will (hopefully) shoot it tomorrow. If bullets dont tumble, i will order firing pin spring and assemble it correctly. May even order a new ejector while I’m at it.



This is the rifle in question. It was a real basket case before. So much better now. Just hope it shoots with its jagged rifling.

You should determine the groove diameter of your barrel by slugging the bore with some soft lead. Then choose, or better, cast a bullet at least one thousandths of an inch greater than the slugged groove diameter. Then your bullets won't tumble and your rifle won't lead up and this is because your slightly overbore bullet will not allow hot blow by gases to get past the bullet. Unless you follow these principles accuracy will be but a dream. Of course you could load and shoot jacketed bullets, and many do, but the correct principle for these vintage rifles with soft steel barrels is a cast bullet of the correct diameter. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I understand that, and when dealing with cast that is what I do (bullet oversized for the bore).

However, in looking at the rifling, I can see it is in poor shape. Am I incorrect in assuming this jagged rifling will sort of “tear” at the bullet as it travels the length of the barrel? That it could put uneven pressure on the bullet as it exits the muzzle and cause it to tumble? Or am I overthinking this? I have a friend that has 20-30 rifles of this vintage and anytime he gets one with poor rifling like this, he has found that jacketed performs better than any cast he tries.

 

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I understand that, and when dealing with cast that is what I do (bullet oversized for the bore).

However, in looking at the rifling, I can see it is in poor shape. Am I incorrect in assuming this jagged rifling will sort of “tear” at the bullet as it travels the length of the barrel? That it could put uneven pressure on the bullet as it exits the muzzle and cause it to tumble? Or am I overthinking this? I have a friend that has 20-30 rifles of this vintage and anytime he gets one with poor rifling like this, he has found that jacketed performs better than any cast he tries.

You'd be amazed, sometimes, that with a bore like a sewer pipe how well a rifle will shoot. That deep cut Ballard rifling that Marlin put in their barrels will handle almost anything. Try it out.
 

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I have a number of old Marlins and bore conditions very from pristine to awful. All have shown some degree of acceptable accuracy. I've found even bores that that look really bad get better with shooting, cleaning, shooting, cleaning, and more shooting. More crud just keeps coming out.

In this video is the rifle with the poorest bore of all or my old Marlins. I had already decided to reline the bore so felt I had nothing to loose by firel lapping the bore. I didn't see any real difference in the bore from the exercise. Apparently, it would take many more rounds to effectively polish the bore.

I wouldn't recommend that anyone try this unless you're as crazy as I am.
 

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My 25-20 bore looked the same. Trouble was the throat was eroded BAD.
I ended up having it lined, shoots good now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks yall. I will likely try some cast then.

If this were my rifle or even if my stepson was a big shooter, I’d put the money in it to have it lined or even rebarreled, but i just dont think he is gonna shoot it much if at all when he gets it back. It’s a shame. It would be a fun rifle i think.
 

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I understand that, and when dealing with cast that is what I do (bullet oversized for the bore).

However, in looking at the rifling, I can see it is in poor shape. Am I incorrect in assuming this jagged rifling will sort of “tear” at the bullet as it travels the length of the barrel? That it could put uneven pressure on the bullet as it exits the muzzle and cause it to tumble? Or am I overthinking this? I have a friend that has 20-30 rifles of this vintage and anytime he gets one with poor rifling like this, he has found that jacketed performs better than any cast he tries.

From everything that I have read, accuracy is more dependent upon the condition of the rifling at the muzzle than through the bore. However, I don't think rusted and pitted bores were part of the discussion of these reads.

I'm guessing that it'll shoot just fine. At least good enough for plinking.

My M1 rifle's original barrel ('43 vintage) looked similar to that and it kept it in the black at 100 yards easily.
 

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If this is an 1894 front firing pin (it doesn't appear to be a two-piece affair, however), I probably did have the bolt apart at one time. Probably happened when I first got the rifle home from where it came. I found this a few days ago in my gun tool box when I was straightening out the work benches.





Holy cow. I have absolutely no recollection of ever having had to source and buy a new firing pin. Getting old is a terrible thing. :hmmmm2:
It took a while but it finally came back to me. This is a Winchester Model 12 firing pin. It came out of an old, cut down shotgun I bought as a practice piece.

Just to set the record straight; this kind of stuff can come back to haunt me if I ever wanted to run for office as a Republican.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well i bought the firing pin spring to try and it didn’t really work that well.

I removed it and installed new firing pin retainer pins and the gun seemed to work fine so i assembled without the spring.
 
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