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All kinds. Enamored of their mechanisms! Worked as an engineering
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I limit my dry firing. Use snap caps instead. Nothing good can come of banging hardened steel against hardened steel. Guns are design to hit a firing pin against the primer which is very soft compared to the steel and cushions the striking blow of the hammer fall.

When dry firing I'll hold the hammer to catch it. Hammerless, I'll retract the bolt to where it just touches the internal hammer (M1s, ARs, AK's, 10-22's and such) and lower the hammer with the bolt. Striker guns don't work with this technique.

JMHO

AC
 

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I just take a fired case and de cap and full length resize it. Cut a pencil eraser down to fit the primer hole and glue it in. Trim it flush and I have a homemade snap cap. No dry fires and the eraser lasts a good 50 trigger pulls...
 

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Aside from the damage to the firearm, I feel it's a very bad habit to get into from a safety standpoint.
If you get into the routine of pulling the trigger on that "unloaded" firearm, one of these days it may not be empty.
The same reason you check to be sure a gun is cleared when someone hands one to you.
 

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All kinds. Enamored of their mechanisms! Worked as an engineering
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ever been in the military?

countless tens of thousands of soldiers have done the "nickel and dime" trigger control drill as a part of marksmanship training under the watchful eyes of ncos...

ssshhhhh! don't tell the army or marine corps.....
And their weapons go to depot for rebuild on a scheduled basis where they are gone through and gauged for every manufacturer's spec there is. Headspace, throat erosion, overall condition, spring rates, pin clearance tolerances, trigger pull...add nausea...

AC
 

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"And their weapons go to depot for rebuild on a scheduled basis where they are gone through and gauged for every manufacturer's spec there is. Headspace, throat erosion, overall condition, spring rates, pin clearance tolerances, trigger pull...add nausea..."

gunscrew - unless the weapon was bent, blown up or replaced by an "a2" or "a3" version - your experience with the military has been considerably different than mine.

but I've only been involved with the army since '79 - i'm sure there are a lot of other guys out there with a lot more experience with small arms at the brigade and below level....

my jm and marlington 1895s are built like bank vaults - what would a limited amount of dry firing damage?

more folks damage trigger groups trying to "tune" them I think than a few hundred dry snaps over 25-30 years of use.

with 4 1895s running from the mid-eighties to last Christmas - I may just be plumb lucky!

it could happen..
 

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my jm and marlington 1895s are built like bank vaults - what would a limited amount of dry firing damage?

more folks damage trigger groups trying to "tune" them I think than a few hundred dry snaps over 25-30 years of use.

:dito: I don't dry fire as much as I used to when I shot in matches but I've dry fired thousands of times with various weapons and they still went "bang". My Marlins I've only done a few times just to check the trigger after work on it.
 

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I just take a fired case and de cap and full length resize it. Cut a pencil eraser down to fit the primer hole and glue it in. Trim it flush and I have a homemade snap cap. No dry fires and the eraser lasts a good 50 trigger pulls...
I have a similar system...fill the primer pocket with RTV; works great.
RT4
 

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Could it be a good idea to solder a little tin in the used cartridge so that the needle stops in it?
 

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Aside from the damage to the firearm, I feel it's a very bad habit to get into from a safety standpoint.
If you get into the routine of pulling the trigger on that "unloaded" firearm, one of these days it may not be empty.
The same reason you check to be sure a gun is cleared when someone hands one to you.
What 95 lever, said. To me, this has always been the primary reason, not, to dry fire.
 

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Without a doubt, security is the most important thing.


My opinion is that the only sense that has dry fire is the training in your own home (in my country you can only shoot in specific facilities for the shot or when you are hunting), very convenient to obtain precision, both for long guns and handguns., or from time to time to know the weight of the trigger
 

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A month ago I would have said there is no problem. The only centerfires I don't dry fire are my Colt revolvers because if they break repairs are not readily available. Who knows what the future holds for Marlins.
 
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