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Yes,that is what Rem uses.Laser checkering sucks.It does not give you well defined points in the checkering.Machine checkering is much better.Better yet nothing beats a talented hand checkered stock.Laser checkering is all about speed and doing it cheap and any idiot can run the laser with little to no training.I would rather they not checker the stock then put this substandard junk on it.It just makes the stock look cheap.JMHO,OB
 

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In large part, I agree with OlBIKER. The majority of firearm MFG'ers have gone to laser and the earlier versions of these wonder machines burn the wood and leave the checkered area darkened. While better than the cheese grater checkering Remington uses on most of the Marlins, I much prefer the CNC checkering that Marlin North Haven employed but Remington discarded it when moving to the plant to Illion.

Better yet, Remington ought to employ using better grade walnut and just leave it smooth. Nothing beats the traditional look that shows off the beauty of walnut.

Jack
 

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Welcome from SW Ohio.

Interesting video.

Agree with the comments above.

It's a wonder that we haven't yet seen checkering on some of the Remlins that were inserted into the machine backwards...
 

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Welcome from SW Ohio.

Interesting video.

Agree with the comments above.

It's a wonder that we haven't yet seen checkering on some of the Remlins that were inserted into the machine backwards...


Now that was chuckle worthy. :laugh:


Jack
 

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Welcome to the forum greenfox2.
I also like the old style hand checkering best.
The laser cut checkering sure does allow for a lot of variety that would be cost prohibitive to do any other way. I should clarify, cost prohibitive to most people.
 

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That must be what it looks like when my mother-in-law gets her face burned off ... err, I mean, gets 'laser ablative therapy'...
 

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Agreed, no checkering on my leverguns. And there is nothing more cheesy than pressed or laser checkering.
 

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And I ordered a whole new set of DemBart cutter blades a couple months ago! Working on a Shanghai commando knife handle on a commissioned knife for a gentleman in Tennessee. Hand checkering I appreciate especially on fine weapons. The checking on this job has taken me almost as long to do as forging the blade and casting the guard and the pommel. Checking quality relates directly to the quality of the rifle.
 

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Checkering is supposed to enhance your grip on the firearm. I had a non checkered pump grip on a shotgun when I was young and ended up cutting grooves in it so it would not slip while working the action. Unfortunately, its utility has gotten forgotten in the desired art work. When I reshaped the stocks on a couple of inexpensive double barrels I checkered them (maybe scratched is a better word) as I did not want my grip to slip. I had a 18 to an inch checkering set, and have since gotten a 20. Those that appreciate checkering seem to like very fine checkering which then defeats its purpose. It is supposed to be both attractive and have some utility.

My first good rifle was a Remington 700 in 270 that had impressed checkering. The design was nice but the impressed checkering was down right ugly as it looked like what it was, dented wood. Some of the newer techniques do look better. Checkering is like the carving I used to do on ML's. Tedious and time consuming. If you know the lines per inch and have a set one can however take some factory checkering and refresh it a bit so it looks more hand made.

DEP
 

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My first good rifle was a Remington 700 in 270 that had impressed checkering. The design was nice but the impressed checkering was down right ugly as it looked like what it was, dented wood.
Pressed checkering is good for one thing: "Ghost Checkering"
If you take a pressed checkering stock, steam out the checkering as much as possible, then sand the surface smooth, it can be as smooth as glass but will still show the checkering when oiled; since the wood fibers were damaged.
Totally impractical and useless for getting a grip; but it does look quite good when done well.

It is one of the tricks that I've used in the past, to take old bargain basement stocks and make them stand out and look a couple grades higher, rather than looking common, old, cheap, and ugly. It's sort of a 'subtle elegance' kind of thing, that really elevates an otherwise boring stock.

This photo is old and dark, and damage that had to be sanded out of the stock meant the 'ghost checkering' didn't turn out as well as it could have; but the stock below belonged to a $75 pile of garbage. A deep clean, $30 scope and rings, bluing touch-up, and total refinish of the stock (highlighting existing stock lines and steaming out the dents and pressed checkering) got me a 1-for-1 trade for a $550 handgun.
I think this is the only one I've photographed. It looks like checkering. But it's as smooth as a baby's bottom...


 

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I have, well, gave to my son, a 60's vintage Ted Williams model 54? 30-06, My first rifle, given to me by my father, which is supposed to be a win. model 70 in sears clothing, which has the prettiest dark walnut stock with lots of figure I've ever seen on a factory stock rifle.
Unfortunately it has some type of floral looking pressed checkering/design.

I sometimes wonder if the guy that pressed that design, on that wood, was blind, stupid, or both....
 

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Amazing machine. Thanks for posting. It used to take me a weekend to cut checker a gunstock, but I am slow and have not done it lately. Laser usually looks better than the old pressed stuff. My friend paid $300 to have it done on a custom carbine and it was very nice cut checkering and looked great. Remember the first of the Ruger 77s with cut checkering and sometimes figured walnut? The rifles sold for a hundred and something. They had Brownell stocks and Douglas barrels, and they made them money. Those rifles were very pretty and could really shoot.
 

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In large part, I agree with OlBIKER. The majority of firearm MFG'ers have gone to laser and the earlier versions of these wonder machines burn the wood and leave the checkered area darkened. While better than the cheese grater checkering Remington uses on most of the Marlins, I much prefer the CNC checkering that Marlin North Haven employed but Remington discarded it when moving to the plant to Illion.

Better yet, Remington ought to employ using better grade walnut and just leave it smooth. Nothing beats the traditional look that shows off the beauty of walnut.

Jack
I thought they were doing "Pressed In" checkerring ----like a stamping----we called it "Lizzard Skin"
 
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