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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Post this in another thread, but thought I might get more reaction as a separate topic. Appreciate any and all info and advise.

Last year I bought what I thought was a 336 chambered in .30-30, simply because it was in great shape and looked good. Later, after checking the serial number, I realized it should be a 1936. It has the B prefix, yet it has the open receiver of the follow-on 336 model.

How can this be? My discussion with a member of the old Marlin Forum left me believing this is not possible, that the 1936 had a closed square receiver bolt, like the 1894. The problem is compounded because it has obviously been rebarrelled with a modern 336A barrel. Gun has new stock and scope, so its collector value is nil. But it came with a scope, at a reasonable price and is very attractive.

A wise and insight friend, whom many of you know as 3Marlins, has told me that serial number dating isn't fool proof, and that Marlins exist with serial numbers that don't square with the known dating scheme or system. We have wondered whether this rifle might be a "transition rifle," as in one of the first made, that has the new 336 design receiver, but carries the B prefix of the 1936.

I also have consider that the gun might have been assembled from parts of various rifles, but can't tell whether it's possible to reconfigured a serial numbered receiver tang with a different receiver. Wouldn't think so, but.......

Any knowledge or thoughts would be appreciated. It really doesn't matter to whether it is or isn't a 1936, though the prefix says it should be and I'd just like to know. It's a puzzle. Still, I love the rifle, the deeply-grained, light wood of which gives its a very unique quality.

Thanks in advance for any explanations or even speculations. -- Lazer
 

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336 has a round bolt. 1936 and 36 have a square bolt. That will tell the tale. Other parts can be swapped. Parley
 
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Is the barrel marked "Marlin" or is it marked "Glenfield", "Western Auto" or some other name which would indicate a special run for some large retail chainstore from 25 to 30+ years ago.
 
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Is the barrel marked "Marlin" or is it marked "Glenfield", "Western Auto" or some other name which would indicate a special run for some large retail chainstore from 25 to 30+ years ago.
 

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There's another possiblity. If your gun has the open sided, round bolt type receiver, it may have had the loer tang assembly changed also. It's possible your gun was made up from various parts, and may well be a 336 with a 1936, lower tang.
To find out, remove the buttstock, and check the left side of the upper tang. The serial number is there also, and should match the lower tang number.
Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks

Thanks gents.

Marlinman93:
Having examined the receiver carefully, it did occur to me that the lower tang might be part of an assembly from a 1936 that could be matched to a 336 assembly, but I was not aware that the serial number also was stamped on the inside tang. I will check that out at the earliest opportunity. Will let you all know what I find. Of course, if the number is different (and I am assuming it will be), should I assume this rifle got this way not at the factory, but afterwards? Or is it possible that the factory used remaining parts in the transition from 1936 to 336?


Guest:
It has a Marlin stamped barrel, a modern 336 replacement barrel.


Parley:
Has the round bolt and open receiver. And otherwise it looks like any modern 336. What threw me was the B prefix. If the receiver comes apart in assemblies such that the lower tang can be matched to any 336, that would seem to be what has happened here. Then I would assume it is not a transition gun, but rather a composite parts gun assembled by a previous owner, who reconditioned the gun and mated a 1936 lower tang assembly into a modern 336 receiver and a new barrel. If so, he did a good job, both on the gun and in confusing me!!

Any other theories or thoughts appreciated. Thanks again.
 

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All serial numbers should match. Marlin never put together parts from different era guns, that were not serial numbered alike.
The early model 1894's used leftover 1889 parts. I have a very early 1894 saddle ring carbine, which has a 1889 receiver, firing pin, and barrel, but all the numbers match, so I would guess Marlin serial numbered these guns, as the parts were fitted together.
 
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