Marlin Firearms Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lately I've been reading a lot here on MO on the .444 and I have some questions about the different models out there.

I just read in Brophy about the Model 444, 444S, and 444SS, but I've also read here about the .444P and the .444 All American. Are there any others? An XLR maybe? :hmmmm:

Can you guys list out the different .444 models and their attributes kind of like what we have in the 336 thread? (http://www.marlinowners.com/forum/marlin-years-manufacture/31126-list-336-model-differences.html)

I'm thinking my 1895M and my three 336's need a brother but I'm not sure exactly what's out there or which one I want. I'm really into short, light, quick handling rifles for hunting deer and black bear here in PA and maybe hunting hogs down south. Ammo availability doesn't really concern me since I just set up my second reloading press. I do realize how hard powder is to come by these days though.

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,457 Posts
I just read in Brophy about the Model 444, 444S, and 444SS, but I've also read here about the .444P and the .444 All American. Are there any others? An XLR maybe?
At least one more, mines a 444T.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,958 Posts
The first 444's had a 24" barrel straight high comb buttstock, round lever, forearm band, that started sometime in 1964, then came the square lever, then in mid 1971 came the 444 with pistol grip buttstock, 22" barrel, and barrel band, and they called this a sporter, hence, the 444S, I don't know when the forearm cap became the norm, but they did this and added a fatter hammer, then came the cross bolt safety and that was the 444SS, for sporter, safety, still a 22" barrel. Somewhere in there they dropped the 1-38 MicroGroove barrel, and went with a 1-20 Ballard, because the Yuppies yelled and screamed that the 1-38 MG can't shoot cast bullets, so Marlin decided to make the Yuppies happy instead of teaching them how to make cast bullets shoot great in the 1-38 MG barrels. Then along came the 444P, outfitter, 18.5 ported barrel, and straight stock, then the XLR came along, stainless, pistol grip stock, 24" barrel.

The All American is not from Marlin, it is a 444SS, that Flattop modified to accept a 2.750 COL cartridge, which gives much greater case capacity, Flattops creation was first introduced in a XLR with a 1-20 twist, and it was called a SG, for Safari Grade, it was created for hardcast bullets of 400+grains. I shamed :flute: Flattop into turning a 444SS with the 1-38 MicroGroove into a SG, to see if by chance it too could get the 400+ grain hardcast bullet to shoot accurately, but! Alas it was not to be, at best 350+ grain hardcast bullet is all it could do accurately. I bought the failed 444SS, and I named it the All American as it will slay anything that roams North America, handily! While I'm still in the testing/ringing out phase, Im sure I can be proud to own such a fine 444.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info everyone.

'OLD GUY, I think you're right, it sounds like the .444P is what I want. Then again, I could always cut down the barrel of a 444, S, or SS. I'm going to start looking around and see if the cost is feasible to go that route.

I've obviously got more to read here.

Thanks again for the info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,457 Posts
The first 444's had a 24" barrel straight high comb buttstock, round lever, forearm band, that started sometime in 1964, then came the square lever, then in mid 1971 came the 444 with pistol grip buttstock
This is where mine becomes an anomoly?, it's dated '71, has the 24" barrle, barrel band, square lever, but the striaght stock doesn't have the high rise cheek piece??, it's a low rise?, but it lines your eye up with the Lyman peep sight VERY nicely!, if it was modified they guy new what he was doing!, it's flawles, that leads me to believe that it's unmodified?, but I can't say that it wasn't ever changed out for a low combe??
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,958 Posts
This is where mine becomes an anomoly?, it's dated '71, has the 24" barrle, barrel band, square lever, but the striaght stock doesn't have the high rise cheek piece??, it's a low rise?, but it lines your eye up with the Lyman peep sight VERY nicely!, if it was modified they guy new what he was doing!, it's flawles, that leads me to believe that it's unmodified?, but I can't say that it wasn't ever changed out for a low combe??
Many people change them out, and maybe at the factory in mid 1971 they had more 24" barrels actions then the high combed stocks, who knows!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
The change to the fore end cap and lack of barrel bands was some time in 1975, a few years into 444S production.
The change to cross-bolt safety and the addition of another 'S' (for 444SS) was in 1983.
Ballard barrels with 1:20" twist rates were introduced in 1998 (August, I believe).
444Ps ran from about 1999-2002.
444Ts were only officially produced in 1971, according to most people that have researched it, but there are several floating around with 1972 serial numbers.
In 2002 the 'SS' was dropped and the model reverted to plain old "444".

Most of that information is available in the "One Humongous Sticky", listing production years as the first full year of production for each change. (So the change to the new magazine style for the 444S, for example, is listed as 1976, even though the change occurred in 1975.)


There have also been internal changes, over the years, but they can be much more difficult to nail down.
The "flipper" (cartridge leveler) on the follower, for example, is something I had researched enough to attribute to just 4 years of production, with a run of about 3,000 rifles in between that did not have the flipper. However.... I keep running across exceptions to the 'rule', with receivers that have the flippers at times when standard production did not. -And it's not something you can just drop in the rifle. The receiver has to be milled for it from the factory. It's almost as if Marlin kept running across old parts, and would kick them out the door with their current production runs.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top