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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My GBL is "on the truck for delivery". I have brass, powder, and primers in house and my RCBS dies, shell holder, and Oregon Trail bullets are due in tomorrow. I have reloaded with Team Green for many years but I've noticed a distinct preference for the Lee Crimp Die around the forum. I've always succeeded crimping .45LC and .44Mag with RCBS.
Is there something special/better about the Lee die for .45-70?

Thanks, Will
 
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I am just starting to put together reloading stuff, and am curious as to what size boolits you ordered for your new GBL. I have read here that slugging the barrel is recommended, but if there is a size that can be ordered with success in lieu of slugging, I'd like to know. Congrats on the GBL!
 

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Morn'in guys and welcome aboard Will!

As per size, within reason, bigger is better. Without slugging the bore, .460 would be a good place to start and if the rifle happened to have Micro Groove rifling, .461 is likely better.

I haven't, but Slugging IS recommended!

Will, Seems that the Lee Collet type Factory Crimp Die almost has a cult following, and there are possibly some places where it may be a deal maker.

However, I have simply and successfully used the three die set for straight wall cases for years.

That continued when I began loading cast bullets for the 45/70.

Providing you take make the effort to properly adjust the seating & Crimping die there will seldom be a reason to put more money in Lee's pocket. I guess saying try before you buy would be a good way to go here.

Make sure you have a need before putting out the bucks, then if you have a proven need for the 4th step with the Lee "FCD" then buy it.

But until that point, no matter how many people use the FCD there many more who just keep on successfully doing as they have for years, Properly adjusting their 3 dies sets and producing good ammo.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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My GBL is "on the truck for delivery". I have brass, powder, and primers in house and my RCBS dies, shell holder, and Oregon Trail bullets are due in tomorrow. I have reloaded with Team Green for many years but I've noticed a distinct preference for the Lee Crimp Die around the forum. I've always succeeded crimping .45LC and .44Mag with RCBS.
Is there something special/better about the Lee die for .45-70?

Thanks, Will
Hey Will,

Have been using the Redding Profile Crimp Die (for 45/70) since '85. Allows use of cast and jacketed bullets.

Lee's FCD may be too "small" for some cast bullets (and "size" the bullet).

Have found best accuracy to be in the "top" of the Trap Door Section of the Manuals.

Look here, for all the info you need on crimping and bulging. http://www.marlinowners.com/forum/45-70-govt/77799-bulges-crimping-dies-another-visit.html

Later, Mark
 

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I'll take the opportunity to (I'm gonna regret this) agree with the Ol'Coot and say that I've been able to achieve excellent results without resorting to another die to crimp or an extra reloading step. Careful, precise setting and crimping can be done quite satisfactorily with standard dies. Not bashing Lee, in fact my standard dies are Lee, just without the FCD.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
LeverForever I just got antsy when I got the OK from the War Dept.and ordered .460 bullets.

Crusty thanks for your reply I just couldn't wrap my head around "the need" for a seperate crimping die after all these years. I've never owned a .45-70 and jut wanted to be sure!

msharley thanks for the link.
 
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I have a web/forum friend in Ohio that is working on developing 45/70 cast bullet loads for his RUGER #1 and another Ohio Friend that is currently doing the same thing with his Marlin.

The #1 owner is currently chasing his tail seeking a consistently shooting bullet and load. AS we all likely know, it is not always as easy to find a good shooting combination with a cast bullet as it is with "J" bullets, but I sent Mike an "E" a few minutes ago, and thinking out loud wondered if a different crimp might help him.

I doubt it, but he/we are grasping at straws here and any thing that adds to his consistency and decreases his groups will be a plus, even if it is, heaven forbid :flute:, a Lee FCD. :biggrin:

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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I have a web/forum friend in Ohio that is working on developing 45/70 cast bullet loads for his RUGER #1 and another Ohio Friend that is currently doing the same thing with his Marlin.

The #1 owner is currently chasing his tail seeking a consistently shooting bullet and load. AS we all likely know, it is not always as easy to find a good shooting combination with a cast bullet as it is with "J" bullets, but I sent Mike an "E" a few minutes ago, and thinking out loud wondered if a different crimp might help him.

I doubt it, but he/we are grasping at straws here and any thing that adds to his consistency and decreases his groups will be a plus, even if it is, heaven forbid :flute:, a Lee FCD. :biggrin:

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
Hey Crusty,

Sometimes a couple of thousandths in seating depth can reap big rewards.

A look at the stock/forearm can also pay dividends. (forearm too "tight", butt stock too "loose")

Are the sights "tight"?

Later, Mark
 

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Thanks Mark,

I think that the bedding on his #1 forend is not helping him at this point. He had a gunsmith friend do the work and to me it is questionable.

I have a method of forend bedding which has been successful for me. I bed to three points and usually completely float the #1 barrel

Here or else where let me hear more about your testing on cast boolit seating depth. I just seat to and crimp in the crimping groove, but with the RUGER I really don' need to crimp other then maybe for a bit better and more consistent powder burn..

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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Hi Will. When you get your Oregon Trail bullets they recommend separating your bullet seating from the crimping. The dies for my 45-70 are Hornady. I am currently using Starline brass. I have been seating and crimping in one step. With my new Starling brass I have noticed a hair thin lead ring separating from the bullet. I believe it is the new brass because my once fired brass does not do this. If seating and crimping at the same time make sure you use the die that flares the end of your case or you will get some bulging of the brass. Good luck and be safe.
 

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Thanks Mark,

I think that the bedding on his forend is not helping him at this point. He had a gunsmith friend do the work and to me it is questionable.

Here or else where let me hear more about your testing on cast boolit seating depth. I just seat to and crimp in the crimping groove, but with the RUGER I really don' need to crimp other then maybe for a bit better and more consistent powder burn..

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
Hey Crusty,

That is my "go to" method.

One 300 gr cast bullet (was using it for the rams, in .44 Mag revolver) seemed to "like" being seated "deep", with just a slight taper crimp. (8" groups at 200 yds, not bad for an iron sighted revolver)

Am still "sorting" the 38-55 out. (need to have a good weather day.....that coincides with a day I "feel" good) LOL

Nephew had a "short" chambered 1895 Guide Gun (properly rechambered since). I shortened some brass by .050" (so as to facilitate cycling in his rifle). Still shot 4-1/2" groups in my CB.....at the 200 yd line.

Figure a revolver has nearly 1/4" of bullet "jump". What's .050"? LOL

This reloading stuff, takes a lifetime to "catch" even a few of the "curve" balls. ROTFLMAO

Later, Mark
 
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