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Discussion Starter #1
I have an H&R Model 088 12 Gauge single shot that is starting to misfire occasionally. Maybe 1 misfire every 8 or 10 shots. Can't tell if it's the hammer spring (though it feels strong in cocking it) or an issue with the transfer bar.

My main local gunsmith wasnt crazy about working on it, didn't flat turn me down but said they weren't his speciality.

A much larger gunshop in the nearest larger town (a well respected establishment) estimated it might be $75 to fix it. I only gave $100 for it, and don't need another $75 in it. This place also warned it's going to get harder and harder to get parts like transfer bars and/or strikers.

As somewhat of an NEF/H&R collector, I am concerned. I've lost count how many of these rifles and shotguns I own but it's 10 or more. I use these guns as working guns, field guns, informal target guns. I grew up on them and always loved their simplicity and dependability.

Apparently I don't need to have repairs needed due to expense and possible unavailability of parts. I am asking myself, Is this a set of guns I should liquidate? Or do I shoot them at will and cough up whatever necessary when something breaks? I didn't like what I was told today.
 

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My Grandfather loved those single barrel shotguns. Some of the parts like firing pins are common to several models. If the lockup is tight at the breech it may be a worn out firing pin. They are still available and cheap. I would fix it or keep it for parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited by Moderator)
Personally I wouldn't sell the others if they are still working. As for the one that is not, only you can make that decision but it might be worth more parted out or kept for spare parts.
Good advice on keeping it for parts. I am sure I'll keep the rest, a bunch are relatively new, between 2000 and 2008 vintage in great shape and giving no trouble.

I guess I assume, and still hope, there will always be a way to keep these old guns repaired when needed.
 

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Firing pins for single shots are very easy to make. Just take the old one out and duplicate it (maybe a tad longer). Most SS firing pins go through the breech at a downward angle and don't have a return spring. The downward angle will cause the shell or extractor/ejector to push the pin back up into its recess when the gun is closed rather than snapping the end off the pin. I have made several to put old SS's back into use.
 

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They are not that hard to work on. They come apart fairly easy, go back together a little harder. Once you get the tools needed for one, they will work for the rest.

You should know how to disassemble for deep cleaning also.
 

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Are you getting lite firing pin hits? There may be gunk on the transfer bar or receiver. Years ago I was given a gun like yours it was clean. I stoned the raised part of the hammer nose that contacts the receiver. This allowed the hammer/transfer bar to push the firing pin in a little more. It works fine for years now.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Are you getting lite firing pin hits. there may be gunk on the transfer bar or receiver. yrs ago I was given a gun like yours. it was clean. I stoned the raised part of the hammer nose that contacts the receiver. this allows the hammer/transfer bar to push the firing pin in a little more. works fine for years now.
7 out of 8 or so shots are perfectly normal, going bang with good primer indention. About 1 in 8 give a light strike, not enough to fire.
 

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Think about it in the context of what it would cost to replace it, rather than your purchase price, you've obiviously had it a long time and $175.00 ism't a bad price for a gun.
 

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Good advice on keeping it for parts. I am sure I'll keep the rest, a bunch are relatively new, between 2000 and 2008 vintage in great shape and giving no trouble.

I guess I assume, and still hope, there will always be a way to keep these old guns repaired when needed.
Google up Numrich and "Every Gun Part' you will find a multitude of parts, schematics and other info
 

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Those shotguns aren't difficult to work on. Sometime back, a neighbor had an H&R Model 88 "Topper" 20ga. that needed a new firing pin. Found the pin on Numerich, along with a new pin spring, reinstalled, and called it a day. Can't remember, but I believe total cost was about $15.
 

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Gun Parts Corp (Numrich) they have schematics and parts for just about anything and, the guns are relatively simple to work on.....but, it sorta sounds like a broken or gunked up firing pin.
 

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Not a shotgun, but a friend of mine had the same problem with a Colt 380 Government pistol. He claimed he had cleaned it down through the years, but when I took it apart, I found the firing pin bore all gummed up with carbon. In fact, it was very dirty on the inside, so I gave it a thorough cleaning and took it to the range afterwards, and it ran like a Singer sewing machine! So it does sound like a light primer strike, possibly caused by a worn firing pin where the hammer makes contact or just a buildup of carbon where it seats in the action.
 

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I would give it a good cleaning first and check the firing pin. I wouldn’t worry about parts availability as there are many of the shotguns around and many parts can be made by a good gunsmith/machinist.
 
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