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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Brother Rich (Airwinky) sent me an evening text last January. My gun cabinet REALLY needed a bronze Christensen Arms Ridgeline, didn’t I agree? Ummmm, whatinnahell are you talking about Rich?
He and a buddy were at a show, and they were grinding on a distributor to meet a price for two Ridgelines that THEY wanted. One more rifle would seal the deal, they were sure of it!
Ah. All understood now…..
2 weeks later I got the call from my FFL. The rifle had arrived, along with the Leupold VX-5 that I had picked out for it. I have limits as a shooter, so I went with .308 Win for the rifle, and stopped at 10X with the scope. Invested the time to break the carbon fiber-wrapped barrel in to Christensen’s recommendations and tried 5 different kinds of factory ammunition through it to see if it had a preference. Not surprisingly, it grouped the best with Hornady Precision Hunter in 178gr. I was happy with that result as well; justified or not, I worry that the .308 might leave me a little under-gunned for a large animal. The heavy 178 grain bullet added a confidence factor.
Send the bullet and environmental information off to Leupold, and wait for the CDS turret to arrive.
By September, everything is set with the rifle/scope combo and it’s off to brother Rich’s place to verify the turret calibration at longer ranges. Gratifying results! The little 20” barreled carbine hits the steel consistently at 275 and 375 yards. Dial up the yardage on the turret, settle in behind the scope, squeeze the trigger and wait a half second. Ping! Good to go…..
There was an underlying reason for all this “work” (as if I needed a reason to dial in another rifle). I had won a southeast Colorado pronghorn hunt in a DSC auction. The hunt was scheduled for Oct 3, and my rig was ready with several days to spare.

Arrived in Lamar, CO at the end of a 2100 mile drive. Declined the opportunity to shoot a couple rounds at the 100 yard range; did not want to second guess my calibration and work-ups. We’re all entitled to our superstitions……Out on the prairie an hour before dawn on the first morning. My guide was the outfitter’s son, the “wet behind the ears kid” that none of the other hunters wanted to take a chance on. But he had impressed me at dinner the night before with his knowledge of the hunt zone and his feel for the antelope in the area. We spotted a group of speedgoats with a BIG buck 400 yards away at about 7 am. 90 minutes of driving and stalking resulted in the goats being 2000 yards away, so we decided to change plans. The goats were moving off our plateau into a low area, and my guide was sure that they weren’t going to be comfortable down there for long. They like to be near the high point, where their sight gives them the advantage. He reasoned that they were NOT going to return to the plateau via the same path the left it (they would remember that WE were there), so we carefully drove a quarter mile away from them and hiked another 500 yards into a hidden position. By now, we hadn’t seen the goats for more than 45 minutes, and it took some self-control to see if our plan was sound.

And then… The group (now more than 30 goats, with half a dozen bucks) came pounding up out of the low about 400 yards away from us. The big buck was right at the back of the pack, and his size was obvious in the presence of all the does and younger bucks. As the group slowed to a trot and started to calm down, he peeled off and came to a stop in a clump of yucca and cactus. He was watching his herd, completely oblivious to me and the guide about 220 yards away. And we were already in prone position, with the little Ridgeline up on its bipod and braced with my pack. Quartering hard towards me, I had a perfect line on his front shoulder. The sight picture froze and all of the work with brother Rich over the last 8 months did the rest. He went down like a bag of wet cement, and my guide’s whoops drowned out the rifle report. I took the quiet walk to put my hands on him, while the guide went in the other direction to retrieve the truck. I wasn’t prepared for his true size. His body was almost as big as a whitetail, and his horns were more massive than our impressions through the binoculars. Rough (raw) measurements back at the ranch an hour later came up to 83 7/8 inches. An amazing result for a Colorado pronghorn, and my first ever speedgoat. If he can hold 80 inches when he’s dry and I have a certified measurement done, he qualifies for Boone and Crockett recording.
With a 20” carbine mountain rifle, on my first trigger squeeze with it on a live animal.
In “old fashioned” .308 Win.
In southeast Colorado.

The best possible result from 8 months of preparation.
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Wow! What a goat, that 4” of hair sure makes them look big. We weighed a 3 year old buck in South Dakota and he field dressed 85 lbs. Never seen anything up there with that kind of headgear! Congratulations, great story.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wow! What a goat, that 4” of hair sure makes them look big. We weighed a 3 year old buck in South Dakota and he field dressed 85 lbs. Never seen anything up there with that kind of headgear! Congratulations, great story.

He sure enough looked like all of the other goats' big brother! I was the target of some good-natured ribbing at dinner that night. Most of the other hunters wanted to know where we had this guy tied up for the last week... :)
 

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Wow brother, that is a helluva pronghorn !
I could tell he was big from the cell pics, but now that I see these... WOW !
The third pic above, and the pic of his bases really show it.
Congrats man, he's a beauty, and it sounds like it was a fun hunt.
 

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Jaysus, that’s a monster! Good write-up, too. Congratulations!
 

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Congrats on that big boy...now THAT'S some girth!
 
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