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How does everyone clean their 1894Cs?

Procedures? (i.e. solvent, then oil) Curious as to what hardware (rod, snake, or otis?)? Also what solvents do you use?

My typical procedure for my other guns is patch with solvent, then brass brush with solvent, and then wipe the solvent with another patch. Then run an oiled patch down the barrel, action, and parts. However, on one of my polymer handguns I also add grease to certain parts.
 

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Hey there pdude -- Welcome to Marlin Owners. I thought with those new fangled polymer guns, you just ran them through the dishwasher and then hosed them down with Pam??!! Sounds like you have a pretty good system on the Marlin. One of the beautiful things with Marlin levers is that by removing the lever screw (with the lever half open), the lever, the bolt and ejector, you can clean your rifle from the breech end. Best regards. Wind
 

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Thanks and glad to be here.

Never threw the polymer in the dishwasher though I've heard of many people doing that. ::) Too funny.

Yeah just picked up an 1894C and can't wait to go out and fire it. Like it since it will go with my 357 revolver. So on your cleaning when you remove the bolt and ejector assembly do you also put a little bit of oil on all the parts after cleaning it with solvent? Or anything else?
 

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Hey again pdude -- I live in an incredibly dusty environment. The moving parts I oil are oiled so sparingly as to not be oiled at all. Every evening I blow the dust out of my carry pistol. When you go to the range with your new rifle, take plenty of ammunition. It's a fun rifle and you'll need it. Don't forget the camera for the required pictures, with the required range report. We don't want to have to tell you twice!! Best regards, Wind
 

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One supposed advantage of a Marlin is that by removing one screw, you can remove the bolt and clean from the breech. Normally, I just but it in the gun vise, open the bolt, spray some Break-free down the barrel, then use patches to clean. I don't use a bristle brush unless I think there might be some lead fouling I need to remove. Seems to work for me. Every so often I will pull the bolt and scrub it down with Hoppe's or Ed's Red. Then wipe down the outside with Break-free. I've heard Hoppe's will remove bluing over time, so I don't use it on the outside.

I clean my guns after shooting them, so they don't seem to get real dirty.
 

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A lot depends on how you'll be using the gun. After practice and range sessions, I just drop the lever, pull the bolt and ejector and clean with patches and solvent using a rod from the rear. If the gun has been soaked from rain or snow while hunting, I'll strip the thing completely and mop out all moisture before cleaning and relubing. I generally do that at the end of the season anyway. I hunt in a swampy area, humidity is frequently 100% and it's a blued gun.

As far as oils and greases, I generally wax the barrel and magazine exteriors with some hard stock wax. I've got some teflon oil I use for pivots and some sliding parts and I use some teflon lube gel on hammer hooks and sear with a light coating on the high-pressure areas of the lever where the carrier stud slides. Locking block and firing pins get a light coating of oil when taken down. The action works best when wet, it's a lot harder to operate with no lube. Just don't slop so much oil on that it gets into the grip area and turns the stock punky. One reason I hit the inletting back there with stock finish until the pores are full.

I use jacketed bullets exclusively for hunting, the barrel doesn't pick up a whole lot of fouling so I don't use a lot of exotic solvents. Hoppes works, Shooter's Choice works, the Hoppes foam works. I used some copper solvent once, didn't get much out with it. Hit the bore with some Sheath or the like for storage. I didn't do that once and had some very light rust at the muzzle after several month's storage. Haven't had that trouble since.

Stan S.
 

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Doc Fillem said:
I've heard Hoppe's will remove bluing over time, so I don't use it on the outside.
Years ago the OLD Hoppe's had ammonia in it. It would remove NICKLE finishes if left on too long. The modern stuff should be good for everything.
I use Hoppe's to clean the barrel and face of the bolt. Then use a couple of drops of 'RUSTPRUFE' on a cleaning patch to wipe down the parts and exterior of the rifle.
Your cleaning method will depend on the climate where the rifle is used.
NEVER use WD-40 on guns. It is for rusty hinges.

Some years ago, I heard a story about an exhibitor at a national gun convention. He would sprinkle Hoppe's on the carpet around his display. It would draw men like flies to honey, but would keep the women away!
M.
 
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