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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I love the internet. So much information on seemingly limitless subjects. I also hate the damned thing because every time I try to find out something very specific I get countless contrary answers...

I know I need to clean my 795 before I take it to the range but how thoroughly? Some say just clean the bore. Some say just field strip it and clean it. Some say disassemble the action and clean that too. I've never done this before so I'd really like to not do anything to potentially harm my brand new carbine whether it be breaking it down too much and bending/breaking something or not cleaning it enough.

And that brings me to the question of what do I use to do the cleaning. Rod? Patchworm? BoreSnake? What solvents, what oils and what kits are good? Hell, I read about a guy that said he used Zippo lighter fluid, 10W40, a wood dowel and old t-shirts to maintain all of his rifles. I have next week off and I'd really like to get this sorted ASAP so I can hit the range on Monday while everyone else is at work.

I am thoroughly confused and can feel a headache creeping in so any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Field strip and clean per the manual instructions but also clean the bore (the manual may say bore never needs to be cleaned, but get the packing grease out. I clean my bore regularly by the way). An Otis pull through kit is fine for this.

I use Hoppes 9 on the internal receiver and bore surfaces as well as the outer surfaces to remove packing grease. Just using Otis patches. The. Lightly oil inside and out.

Do not over think it.
 

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My entire 22 cleaning kit is

Otis pull through kit and patches (available at any gun store, dicks sporting goods, or amazon)

Rem Oil disposable wipes for wiping off finger prints in external surfaces

Hoppes 9 to clean and Hoppes gun oil for light coating of all surfaces when done.
 

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I do the same over thinking. I read for two hours about setting reel drag on my reels. I've been fishing for 20 years and set it the same way I always did after all of that reading.

Next you will fall into the "sighting in rifle - what rests , what method?" Trap. Don't fall into this trap. Enjoy your new rifle and sight it in in whatever method is intuitive to you. Do not buy a special rest. Use a sandbag or a rolled up towel.

Learn how to operate your rifle's safety, bolt release, how to charge it and fire, magazine loads and swaps. Practice the rules of gun safety. Enjoy yourself.
 

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The only cleaning you "need " to do before Monday is to patch the barrel and wipe down the inside of the receiver to make sure no leftover machining metal particles interfere with the rifle action or get stuck between moving parts or obstruct the barrel. Don't go to lengths and money that make it a chore rather than a chance to get to know your rifle and get it safe and functional for your range time.
 

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As the owner of a bore scope, I reckon I know all about "overthinking":biggrin: but there is no need for you to go that far if you are new to shooting. Clean the bore before shooting if it is new, with metho on a patch or two. I think Americans call it de-natured alcohol. Squirt Ballistol down the bore after shooting. Leave it in on the trip home to soak into the carbon. Clean out with a patch at home. Do it again until you get clean patches. Re-oil to stop rusting. DEpending on how many shots yoy fire, the bolt face might need cleaning.
That should do you:biggrin:
 

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I love Ballistol.
 
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Does Marlin test fire their new Firearms before leaving the Factory? There would be no residual machining metallic particles if they do..

I have only purchased one new Firearm in my life. That was my wifes little Ruger SR22 Pistol. It was test fired, so I did not see the need to clean it first..
 

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Marlin does test fire, all new 60's I have came dirty. I clean my 60's at the end of squirrel season, just follow the manual. The Model 60 is one of the easiest autos to clean after you try it once, just follow the manual. I only use a brass brush when accuracy starts to fall off, happy shootin'.
 

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Does Marlin test fire their new Firearms before leaving the Factory? There would be no residual machining metallic particles if they do..

I have only purchased one new Firearm in my life. That was my wifes little Ruger SR22 Pistol. It was test fired, so I did not see the need to clean it first..
You are assuming they cleaned it prior to the test firing. I have purchased several new firearms in my lifetime and they all needed a thorough cleaning prior to their first use. Run of the mill firearms made like Dolly Madison cakes are not prepped at the factory like a $XX,XXX fine English double gun. They all need their first bath when they come home with you. Test fired or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Thanks for all the help. Now I don't feel the urge to pull my hair out at the thought of cleaning my 795. :biggrin:
 

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Here's a suggestion for you to consider. EEZOX is a CLP (Clean, Lub, Protect) spray that has been used by our military extensively in Afghanistan and other harsh environments, where oils are problematic for automatic rifles there. I've been using it for several years now and it hasn't created any problems for me. Quite the contrary actually, affording much easier bore cleaning after range work is done for the day. A quick spray on a couple of patches and run thru the bore and you're done. Great stuff. Leaves little residue and is not greasy. Google it. :)
 

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One thing I would suggest when cleaning a new rifle that is factory fresh is using a bore mop and Hoppes #9 Solvent down the bore the first time around. When I cleaned my unfired Model 1895 the first time there was a significant amount of white grease that the factory used before the rifle was shipped. I did have a good sized cotton cloth in place at the receiver side of the bore to absorb what came out. After factory grease is cleaned out, running a couple of clean patches down the bore would make sure the rifle is ready to fire. I have read that many US Military combat soldiers fire their rifles with a dry bore. Using oil on a barrel when firing can cause pressure to build up in barrel, which is not a good thing.

The EEZOX product sounds like its worth trying.



Cheers!



Mike T.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Since I have to clean my carbine in the house I went with Hoppe's Elite cleaner and oil after reading the MSDS. One BoreSnake and a pack of cheap Walmart toothbrushes later and I'm in business. Field stripping and doing the initial cleaning was much easier than I thought, so easy I'm almost sure I did something wrong. :) I plan on getting an Otis kit when I get more firearms.

Anyway thanks again for all the help guys. A guy I work with traded me 100 rounds of Federal Gold Medal Match for four Checkerburgers (he only wanted two but I gave him four) so I'm all set for the range tomorrow. :)
 
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