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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First, I do not reload.....yet. I am reading and learning so far and just hoping to find the time to start this hobby at some point. Right now I have a new XL7 in 3006 and a Glock 23 .40 cal. Right now my only thought is to reload for the 3006. I'm liking the looks of the Lee Classic Turret and have watched several video's on youtube and most I have found deprime in a seperate operation (using the turret as a single stage) and then cleaning the priming chamber. You could use the turret as a multistage and deprime and prime as part of the process. Is it really necessary to clean the priming chamber? If it is, why don't people deprime and then clean the cases with media and not have to stick the little tool in each case to clean the primer pocket? Or have I read so much that I am confused?
 

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Because if you deprime and then try to clean the primer pockets in the tumbler the media gets lodged in the primer pocket and you have to poke it back out. Cleaning media does not remove primer scale very well.

Believe it or not, most users that reload don't clean primer pockets when loading on a progressive or semiprogressive press.

Rifle loaders, who load fewer rounds in most instances, are the most likely "primer pocket cleaners." An old screwdriver or purpose built tool sold by Lee, Lyman, RCBS etc. is what is used for the job.

For handgun loading in large volume cleaning the primer scale out of the pocket is a personal choice. Many won't load without doing so. Many don't care if the primer pocket is cleaned out or not. While the handloading manuals call it "good procedure for positive contact of the primer's anvil to the bottom of the pocket" in many cases it just doesn't matter if it is done or not.

I've never had a misfire due to failure to clean out a primer pocket. FWIW.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the response! Media getting stuck in the pocket makes sense......... Your thoughts mesh with mine on this. Anyone else?
 

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Yep, I do it a lot especially when I get brass that has already been deprimed, and then I sit there and pole out all the media. So it's much better to clean before depriming. I also think that cleaning the primer pockets is overblown. If the primer seats correctly, you won't get a FTF. That being said, I do try to run the little primer cleaner in them most of the time.
 

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El Kabong
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Lube
size & deprime
media clean
remove media from case
trim case
primer
powder
seat projectile.

When I have cleaned the cases. I take it out of the media, dump it out, use a pick to clean out the primer pocket, and blow compressed air from the primer pocket out the neck.

I dont care if its a pistol or rifle round, bottle neck or shouldered case, big or small.
The media cleans the entire case, inside and out.
 

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As Pard was saying...

For bottleneck cases, you have to lube them to resize them. After the resizing (and depriming) I chuck them in the tumbler to get the case lube off them, it just makes sense. After that you can twist out the primer pockets with a cleaner if you believe it is necessary. I don't really have any problems with media getting stuck in the flash hole, so I feel it is a non-issue.
 

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Bottleneck rifle cases: I lube the cases if I am full length resizing, no lube if neck sizing. And I clean the primer pockets. I just use a towel to clean off the lube (if I lubed, that is), after resizing.

Straight or slightly tapered cases, including handgun cases: No lube necessary, and I don't bother cleaning the primer pockets.

And I don't even own a case tumbler. Just a tap to knock loose anything in the case is all that is necessary, surface tarnish or internal carbon stain doesn't really matter. Pretty brass is pretty, but it doesn't shoot any better than stained brass. Years of loading has shown me that.
 

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I clean the primer pocket and also clean the flash hole... every time.

I reload partly for the lower cost, but mainly for accuracy. I try to make every cartridge as uniform as possible. I think the primer pocket cleanliness is as important, if not more so than the outside of the case. I only clean the outside thoroughly after annealing.
 

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As usual, everybody has a different opinion.
 

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On rifle cases I do deprime and dip cases in Iosso Brass Case Cleaner liquid brass cleaner before tumbling in media. The liquid cleaner does a good job cleaning inside the case and the primer pocket. After that I prepare the case which involves sizing, trimming, flash hole check, chamfer and deburr. I never had a problem with media clogging up the primer pocket. But if you put to much brass polish in the media it will clog not only the primer pocket but the whole case as well.

TO NY


Iosso Brass Case Cleaner is a quick and easy liquid brass cleaner that removes fouling, tarnish, oil and grime from cases leaving brass bright and clean. A simple immersion in the liquid, a quick rinse and dry is all that is needed.
 

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My order of reloading:

1. Deprime using a dedicated depriming die

2. Clean brass using SS media in a wet tumbler

3. Lube and Resize

4. Trim

5. Very light reclean to remove lube

6. Load em up!
 

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As I always tell my wife. " I am not saying my way is the only way to do it, but it is the right way" ;D

I usually deprime everything before I store it. I do not always reload m/t cases right away. I have a RCBS partner press just for depriming. When I actually reload I pay close attention to everything. I can deprime if I have a few minutes here or there. I can also let my kids deprime to have something to do sometimes. I usually deprime, clean and store in bulk. If I get some time latter I will size and trim to length, then they are stored in cartridge containers. Alot of times by the time I get time to actually reload, I have lots of cases ready to go, just add primer and powder. I must say I am somewhat of a horder when it comes to reloading stuff and have alot of cases for the calibers I use, so I am not having to reload the same few cases to have something to shoot next time. The amount of cases you are working with will play a big part in how you are loading and the steps you are taking to get it done.
 

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I must be a "tumbling freak" as I tumble all brass twice ... so here are my steps (not much difference)

1. tumble all fired brass
2. spray lube with One-Shot and let sit for about thirty minutes
3. resize and deprime in one step (I have a universal depriming die but do not use)
4. tumble brass again to clean lube
5. trim if necessary (I never trim straight wall pistol brass)
6. deburr and chamfer
7. clean primer pocket and check flash hole for media
8. prime brass
9. add powder
10. add bullet

I have never had a problem with One-Shot spray lube though I have read about others having issues. I use it generously but not to the point of running off the brass. I lay my brass down in rows (usually 3 rows) across an old cookie sheet with the case mouths facing me and spray. I then slightly tilt the cookie tray to the right so the brass rolls over and I spray again.

bjm
 

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Me too. But without the kids.

Deprime
Dip in liquid case cleaner.
Rinse let dry.
FL Size.
Trim chamfer & deburr
put in plastic bag with work note and date
Ready to be loaded.
I usually prepare 200 cases at a time


TO NY
 
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