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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First, does one need to clean a brand new 336? I usually run a patch down the barrel of a new gun, but the last two that I have gotten have been clean as a whistle. Secondly, can one effectively use a bore snake on a 336 without removing the bolt? The “take down” procedure seems simple enough, but it would be nice to just be able to run a patch or a bore snake through the gun after a light day of shooting. All of my other rifles are break/ bolt-action so I guess that I am kind of spoiled.
 

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Well there real easy to strip and clean.. yes you can use a bore snake.. I always strip , clean and oil ever firearm before its ever taken to the range or ammo put in it..
 

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Marmot,

I will send you directions after I get home this evening. There is also a Reference Material forum on this site and the info is most likely there. Let me know if not.

Welcome to a great group,

Dave 8)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well...I stripped and cleaned the gun this evening. I stopped by Outdoor World, and purchased a .30 cal bore snake; however, I decided to use the old tried and true "twenty pound test line" method. I learned this method while cleaning precision air rifles that have ultra delicate rifling. Basically, one ties a patch to section of 20lb test line, threads the line from the breach to the muzzle, then one pulls the patch through the bore. I usually tie a perfection loop (a basic fly fishing knot) in the end, and thread the line back through it. The patch gets inserted before pulling the line taught.


Anyway, while I had the bolt out, I noticed that the machining for slot through which the lever engages the bolt is quite rough. In addition to having coarse milling marks on the inside the slot, the outside edge is slightly jagged--kind of like the slot was cut by hand. Is this normal? Or has this gun been tampered with? It was sold as new at a reputable store, and it does not look like it has been fired.
 

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I would say just poor quality control. and some probably would just dress up the rough stuff if they chose.. I don't mess with it.. I just shoot them. clean and shoot some more :D
 

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I stress out a bit at the sight of even a minor defect. I'm sure it has no effect on shooting or the safety of the rifle but I would attach an emery sleeve or wheel to my dremmel and polish out the rough edges.

I don't think much can be done with the machine marks inside the lever slot except with an emery board but the bolt material is so hard and your leverage is so limited...

Is the action reasonably smooth?

SS
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sidespin said:
Is the action reasonably smooth?
It is reasonably smooth. The thin outside edge of the slot on the top of the bolt is chipped in places (looking at the bolt, with slotted end facing forward, this edge is on the left-hand side), and the perimeter of slot on the bottom definitely looks like it was fitted using a file (like they relieved the edge using a file).

Anyway, after looking at the parts diagram in the manual, I noticed that the bolt is a gunsmith-only part. Hence, that pretty much explains what looks to be hand tool marks on the bolt. I guess that in a modern, high-production facility, little or no effort is made to make adjustments look pretty.

In closing, I guess my concern with the gun was due to seeing handwork in a mass-produced item. In the age of CNC-based production, one rarely sees non-perfect machining. Clearly CNC-based gun manufacturing has not progressed to the point where hand adjustments are no longer required.
 
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I bought a couple of bore guides from Sinclair Int. for my 30/30 and 44 levers that fit over your rod and work from the muzzle end. Works OK if you don't have that much to clean and don't feel like taking the bolt out. For heavy fouling, I just cock the lever down to open the bolt about an inch, take the screw out of the lever and take off, then pull the bolt out, take the ejector out and you're in business. I need a pair of tweezers or needle nose pliers to put the ejector back in for my M336. BM

Bill
 
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