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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, I'm new to the Marlin forum. I joined because just a few days ago I found my childhood Marlin single-shot 22 bolt action that my Father gave to me shortly before he died in an accident in 1963. I was 15 years old when he gave it to me but he didn't tell me anything about it. It may have been his father's gun before him, but I don't know. The only thing I remember about the 22 is when Dad used to shoot mice in Grampa's barn with it before he passed it to me. On the top of the barrel it says "The Marlin Firearms Corporation" and under that says "New Haven, Conn. U.S.A.-Patented". Near the receiver on the side of the barrel it says "22 S.,L & L.R".

There doesn't appear to be any other markings on it as I have it apart in an attempt to restore it for a wall hanger. If anyone knows where I can get more information on this rifle, I'd appreciate it. The Marlin website wasn't much help. Another thing I know I'll need is a rear sight because the top of it, where the notch is for the stepped elevator is broke off.

I'm attaching a few photos. It was pretty rusty, but I've cleaned it up enough to take pictures of it. If anyone can help with a model number or an age it would be greatly appreciated.

PS Don't laugh at the stock, it was a 16 or 17 year old kids idea of how to re-finish a stock.

marlin 001 (2).JPG marlin 001.JPG marlin 003 (2).JPG marlin 004 (2).JPG
 

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I have one that was made by Marlin and is a single shot bolt action that my father had back in the 1950's. What are the markings on the barrel? It should say the manufacture and where it was made. The way that is worded and where the factory was may give some clues to age. I would also think there is a model number on the barrel as well.I will look at mine again when I get home. Mine does not have the cap on the fore end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
On the top of the barrel it says "The Marlin Firearms Corporation" and under that it says "New Haven, Conn. U.S.A.-Patented". Near the receiver on the side of the barrel it says "22 S.,L & L.R". the periods and commas between the letters was about in the middle of the letters, not towards the bottom like we do it today. No model number or anything else on the barrel.

That thing you're calling a cap on the fore end is just black paint I put on it with a thin white line of paint to separate the black from the wood, for a late 60's version of what I thought was "cool". I also painted the edge of the steel butt plate with white. I may have been copying a newer gun I saw in a catalog when I refinished the stock back then.

Edit: I'll have to check the barrel again (I'm not at home now). I read Wikipedia and they mention North Haven, Conn., I thought it said New Haven. I'll report back tomorrow (Tuesday).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I re-checked the city engraved on the barrel and it's indeed "New" Haven, not "North" Haven. Hopefully, if Marlin made a move, it'll help narrow down it's date of birth.

I was hoping to get more responses here. Did I post this thread in the right spot?
 

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I forgot to check mine. I will try and look at it tonight. The rimfire section may have been better but people should see it here and respond. I thought it may have been paint but from the pictures it looked to shiny so I thought it was some type of plastic cap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I forgot to check mine. I will try and look at it tonight. The rimfire section may have been better but people should see it here and respond. I thought it may have been paint but from the pictures it looked to shiny so I thought it was some type of plastic cap.
Thanks for responding Golphin. If I don't get any info here I may re-post in the Rimfire area. I'm really anxious to get some information on this great old gun. It took me a very long time and many guns before I found one that was as accurate as this old friend of mine. I remember as a kid amazing my friends, when I shot bobbers floating in the pond at 50 yards and even farther. There weren't too many times that it took more than one shot to sink um, even with those stock factory iron sights. Now-a-days I need a scope to accomplish the same thing. Back then a 50 round box of 22's cost about 20-25 cents. I can remember the store owner telling me that the reason they were "so expensive" was because of the cost it took to make the box. Boy, I'd love to see those prices again!
 

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Interesting post Topgun and I love to hear these old gun stories. I read in my Blue Book Marlin made a Model 100 and Model 101 single shot 22 in the era 40s to 50s. Not sure if this is yours of course but its possible Model Number is not on gun. Sounds like a great keepsake and thanks for sharing it with us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Schtoolee has a sticky here that is very comprehensive and gives model numbers and production dates. Just let me complement him here, before saying that by using his fine work, I can narrow down my rifle to either:

Model 65 made from 1935-37
Model 65E made from 1935-37
Model 100 from 1935-1959
Model 100SB from 1941-45
Model 100G from 1960-65

These appear to be the only single-shots manufactured by Marlin through the years. I don't understand why Marlin didn't stamp a model number on the one I have. I'm hoping that the model number/birthday can be determined by the shape of the stock or the bolt perhaps. When a cartridge is manually placed in the chamber, and the bolt is closed, you must pull back on the back part of the bolt until it clicks, and then you can pull the trigger and shoot..
 

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I re-checked the city engraved on the barrel and it's indeed "New" Haven, not "North" Haven. Hopefully, if Marlin made a move, it'll help narrow down it's date of birth.

I was hoping to get more responses here. Did I post this thread in the right spot?
Marlin moved from New Haven to North Haven in 1968
 

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Mine is a model 100. My dad had this and it was my first gun. I was born in 1958. I think the stock was shortened so a kid like me could use it. I would say I was Squirrel hunting with my dad using this or the single shot 410 by the time I was 7 years old.

model 100 2.jpg madel 100.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for posting the pics. Our rifles are very similar. Two differences that I see are that my hammer on the back of the bolt has 5 or 6 grooves cut into it, and my stock doesn't have a notch where the bolt handle sits when it's closed. I can't see your trigger guard or trigger to see if they are the same or different.

From Boobarzo's post, my rifle is pre-1968, but that doesn't help to much too determine the year or model. I kind of figured that because I received it in 1962. Also, I don't think I mentioned this earlier, but the barrel is 24" long.
 

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Topgun, check out this link. The Gun Digest Book of Modern Gun Values: The Shooter's Guide to Guns 1900 ... - Google Books
Models 65 & 65E had a grooved fore-end = no match
Model 100S "Tom Mix" had a rear mounted peep sight= no match
Model 100SB was a smooth bore for .22 shot = no match
Model 100G was a Glenfield model = no match

That leaves the Model 100. I believe this is what you have. My JC Higgins 103.18 appears to be identical to your rifle. The JCH is a house-brand Model 100 produced by Marlin for Sears post-war. Their are a few cosmetic changes between my rifle and yours. The cocking knob on my JCH is slightly extended and my butt plate is plastic, not metal. The single action screw on my rifle is a pan-head screw, whereas yours appears to be a knurled knob. I believe all these differences can be explained by the fact that yours is an earlier model. My rifle is from the '46 to '54 era. Also note that in the Gun Digest description of the Model 100, the refer to it as a take-down model, thus explaining the knurled knob action screw.



My J C Higgins 103.18
 

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Topgun, check out this link to an excerpt from William S. Brophy's book.

Marlin Firearms: A History of the Guns and the Company That Made Them - William S. Brophy - Google Books

Lots of information on these pages. They even have a pic of the roll stamp you describe. From what I can deduce, I believe you have an early model 100 built during the transition from 65 to 100. The action is definitely model 100. Note the position of the bolt handle in relation to the trigger. Model 65 handle was directly above the trigger. The roll stamp you describe is shown as from a model 65 barrel. Maybe using up extra parts at the beginning of the new model run?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Sorry, I haven't been around in a while.

Thanks for the information Korny, I think you may be right. It's funny how it appears that the company has all the information needed to nail down the origin of a particular firearm, but as you go through it, you find little discrepancies that leave a lot of doubt.

From what I see from your link, my 22 is much older then I thought. Maybe in the 1935 range. It makes me think now that my Grandfather did buy it, and passed it to Dad. I've already made arrangements to pass it down to the fourth generation, with the stipulation that the fifth generation (4 yrs old now) will get it next. Thanks again!
 
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