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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

I had a good chuckle with this video as a reminder - cheap hunting knives can work.... I especially thought the $0.99 bait knife sharpened up for real cutting duty was something.... Apparently he really does (or did) use it as a serious hunting knife....

I guess I am not too far off this myself... I learned to cut fish with a cheap birch handle Rapala fillet knife. Then I got
my own when I was old enough.... I have been filleting fish for 30+ years with those cheap Rapala knives... I have cut thousands of fish with mine and it just keeps going.... I honestly never even knew there was any other type of fillet knife for probably 20 years....

How about you?

 

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Great video. I have used the small Rapala filet knife for years and it just keeps on going. I used to have a Cold Steel Pendleton Lite Hunter but gave it to my son 2 years ago. It is a great inexpensive option. I’ve settled on the Buck Vangaurd for my hunting knife.

I bought a Browning knife set on clearance probably 12 years ago for $20 that still gets used every year. It came with a gut hook, skinner and saw.
 

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Discounting that a knife CAN be a work of art.... A comfortable handle and a blade that will take and hold an edge. Anything more starts getting into ego more than what a knife is for.
 

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I have used cheap knives and they work. Now a days I can afford to go middle ground and use ones that cost $50 to $100. Hold and edge better and I don't have to sharpen as often. I cut through the joints and cutting the tendons laying on the bone dulls the blade some. Better knives hold up longer. There is a American made Buck knife I use a lot. Got it at an RMEF banquet. Sharpens easy but dulls easy as well. Blade shape works great, it is considered a caper knife. https://www.buckknives.com/product/135-paklite-caper-knife/0135FAM01/
Not the best steel but a great design. Peels and slices skin really nice. It only costs $25. I would pay a lot more if they'd use better grade steel.
V
 

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I am a big fan of inexpensive Mora Companion knives,
and Cold Steel's version of the classic Canadian Belt knife,
for hunting and camp chores.

If I carried a $50+ knife into the woods, I know I'd lose it in a heartbeat.
I have a bunch of nice knives, love 'em all... but they stay safe at home.
 

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About the only knife I ever use is a Victorinox pocket-knife. My favourite model is the officers model. I do 4-5 moose every year, a caribou or two, at least one bison, and countless furbearers. Most of these animals are caped for taxidermy too. I never use the "traditional" hunting knives, nor do any other professional guides or trappers that I know.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
So I couldn't find a $0.99 bait knife - but Bass Pro Shops has a $1.79 bait knife.... So I tried it out....
1A21590C-4C4F-4A17-864C-A07320A29510.jpeg

Pro's:
Cheap
Stainless
It's thin - so it cuts easily
Cuts very well when sharp
The handle shape is decent
Dish washable
The width of the blade adds stiffness - so it doesn't feel flexible like a cheap fillet knife pattern
Easy to sharpen and takes a good edge
Responds well to a kitchen knife steel and conventional stones.
Responds well to a strop or a leather belt.
I don't feel bad about sharpening it up on my Worksharp belt sander sharpener unit

Cons:
No sheath or blade guard to cover it in the tackle box.
Comes pretty dull out of the pack (no surprise there)
It's not "pointy"... A sharp pointy tip is super useful for getting into stuff and it's tip comes pretty round out of the package.

I have been put fishing twice since I got it.. Forgot to take it both times. I ended up using my trusty Swiss Army Knife to cut the eels we were using for bait.

I put it into the kitchen knife block to see how that goes. It seems to work fine in "Paring knife" and "Small chef's knife" sort of duty. It cuts fruit, veggies, and meat just fine. I also used it on a catfish I caught for dinner the other day and it went fine.

Steel wise - it's neither the worst stuff in the kitchen nor the worst stuff I have owned in a knife. It's not a Buck but it's worlds better than the old 1980's Pakistan "Stainless steel" pocket knives. It's definitely not any flavor of super steel - just stamped out of plain old cutlery stainless steel.

I also don't know if it's heat treated beyond normalizing it. It's certainly not chippy - but it's not mushy either. Honestly - I don't much care - it takes a decent edge and holds it as well as any other cheap kitchen knife.
 

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My first deer knife was a Schrade Cliphanger. I don’t remember what I paid for it but I’m sure it was very inexpensive because I was very poor at the time.

The cliphanger could keep a really sharp edge and I dressed out quite a few deer with it. The problem with it was it was next to impossible to clean. The texturing on the handle would trap all kinds of fat, hair and gristle and I would have to boil the whole knife for an hour or more to get the crud out of the grip.

I still have it but it’s been relegated to absolute last option backup duty.
 

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All kinds. Enamored of their mechanisms!
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Buck 500E, 2 3/4 drop point, stainless bolsters, rosewood panels. Like a 110 only the drop point. Best knife ever since, 1974 when I became a Buck man.

AC
 
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