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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a 45/70 that required a little restoration, so far I have replaced the forearm, the forearm tenon and tip for $70.00 AUD I still have to refinish the butt and she needs a re-blue.

Instead of blue I was thinking of Cerakoting the old girl I have done this on another rifle and have been pretty impressed with its durability has anybody Cerakoted a 1895 and if so what was your impression.

Photo; 014 - Copy.JPG The old girl with old stock and new forearm and tip.
 

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Have seen three of them here and several other rifles as well. One is owned by a long time hunter who is very happy. Never a complaint from any owner except it will never touch the appearance of a fine blue, much less case hardening. For a working firearm just fine. On the list for mine, once I am sure I have it set up just as I want it. Alaska weather is a challenge on metal with salt water often nearby and temperatures that push limits. One of the rifles is stainless underneath,which is only rust resistant not rust proof, so the combination should survive as a relic of what we loosely call civilization.
 

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I agree, its good stuff IF put on right, prep and how its done with it makes a huge difference
so make sure who ever does it has good results/history doing it

there are actually many good coatings out there
I just did a nice 1911 in Black nitrate, very happy with that finish as well
not the same as blueing, but has a nice touch to it on a working gun, or even a gun you plan to save for yrs
the 1911 I did was a 1918 Rem UMC, so its not like it was a gun just for work LOL





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I had my 1894 limited done in Birdsong and assoc. black-T back in 2000. The Teflon based coating is very tough (maybe not as hard as Cerakote) but has the benefit of the Teflon penetrating the micropores of the underlying metal. I have a duty pistol that was done at the same time and has holster wear down to what looks like bare metal. The bare looking metal has been sweated on quite a bit and has never shown even a hint of rust. I highly recommend it for extreme environments.

 

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I haven't used cerakote, but I had my 1895gs done in NP3 by robar , check them out they have many different options and are very well thought of. robarguns.com
JB
 

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I have had 3 pistols done in cerakote, a shotgun, pistol and 1895 done in Black T and 4 rifles done in Teflon. Don't know which is the best, all are working wonderfully. Black T has been on the longest and I have no complaints about it's durability. Really like the way the cerakote looks. Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the suggestions I never thought of case hardening that could be the go as well , more food for thought.
 

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there are a ton of great coatings on the market today, BUT it really comes down to PREP, and experience with using what ever one is used

if you want to read a bunch of pro's conb's feedback on gun coatings
go you a 1911 forum, and look up gun coating
there are guys there that use guns daily and can tell you what coatings they like best that have held up, and what looks closest to bluing, and so on
tons of great info there
a coating on a rifle will last longer, they tend to take less abuse(no holser wear or as as much LOl)
I have a teflon coated rifle, since 1986, or 87 forget, still holding, but like other coatings better!
also had one done in like 1997 that is flaking in spots, guy did lazy prep work on that one, but was dirt cheap in price LOL
like I said, you some times get what you pay for on work, and not the products fault, but how it was put on
 

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I've done several rifles and handguns with Cerakote. It's wonderful stuff, provided you've done the prep work right. Not an 1895, but I did this Glenfield Model 30 in Sniper grey Cerakote. It looks like a matte blue job, but much harder and more rust resistant. This old 30-30 was given to me as the owner had put it away in a damp case and forgot about it. I got all the rust off with some steel wool except for a little pitting near the muzzle that I could not remove. I sent it to Jesse Ocumpaugh in Oregon and he re bored it to .356 Winchester. A new Deluxe 336 stock from Marlin completed the project and it has turned out to be a wonderful shooter.
 

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I've had my Knight Bighorn and an AR-15 done in Cerakote and highly recommend it.
My Cerakote applier is currently in the process of changing liability insurance companies but I will soon be having my 1895SS Cerakoted in Graphite Black. Go for it.
 

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I recently purchased a 45/70 that required a little restoration, so far I have replaced the forearm, the forearm tenon and tip for $70.00 AUD I still have to refinish the butt and she needs a re-blue.

Instead of blue I was thinking of Cerakoting the old girl I have done this on another rifle and have been pretty impressed with its durability has anybody Cerakoted a 1895 and if so what was your impression.


Photo; View attachment 110803 The old girl with old stock and new forearm and tip.

Hey **** I have had a few rifles done and have found that they withstand the humidity in Qld just fine and are great for field rifles as they seem less likely to mark or even scratch.... Wild Dog in Brisbane do it well - Ask for Mark and tell him SA Dave send ya!
 
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