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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I recently bought an 1895s over the internet which was slightly misrepresented in the ad to adegree. Ad read, "One owner bought from new etc only fired a few rounds etc."Yes it has only fired a few rounds by looking at the bolt face and internals seen when stripped for cleaning but and it's a big but.

On its arrival, I found that the rifle evidently had been laying on one side on a cloth or maybe the inside of a gun bag. Moisture had formed rust, killing the bluing and forming very slightest pitting. As I am in Queensland, Australia, where gun laws are strident, returning the firearm to its previous owner is out of the question.

I have been thinking of Cerakoting the outside of the rifle, I have a contact that will do the job but he is not a gunsmith. So I will have to strip the rifle then reassemble it. So my first question is "How easy/difficult are 95s's to reassemble?"

Having Cerakoted a Win 9422m I which I found the reassemble a little difficult due to the Cerakote increasing the surface thickness slightly. Things like the magazine tube and recess needed to be sanded to clean off the Cerakote finish to enable fitment. The internal parts were Cerakoted as well so the action felt a little doughy when cycled but soon came good after cycling for a couple of hours though my hand and wrist were a little worse for the wear. I don't intend to Cerakote the internal bits of my 95s.

Before I go ahead I would like the question about reassembly answered and if anybody else has Cerakoted their lever guns to offer some advice, whether to go ahead or not. Thanks
 

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I don't know about a 95 but I assume they take down very similar to a 94 or a 336. There are some very good step by step videos on You Tube. I am trying to remember back to when I first disassembled one but I don't remember having a major problem, but that was a long time ago.
 

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The 1895, like the 336 is reasonably easy to take apart and reassemble.

Re cerakote, I bought a well-worn, Smith and Wesson revolver. The finish was slightly pitted on one side. A gunsmith told me that he couldn't polish and re-blue it, so I had it finished in cerakote - which has worked out very well. It's been several years now, and that finish is wearing here and there, but the revolver still looks good and works great.

Regards, Guy
 

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Bluing is always better but if to much metal has to come off do it if it works it works. Just so you know all pitting has to be removed 100%. The most minute in the bottom of a pit will still eat your gun.
 

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Reassembly is not difficult and there are tons of youtube videos on that matter. Just a little patience and no real specialty tools and youll have it mastered in no time.

When it comes to cerakote, as long as it is done correctly and using the baked version, it will be a very durable and long lasting finish. Its all in the preparation. biggest thing Ive dealt with is like you said in your original post is that you have to worry about film thickness on parts.

Im actually about to start a personal cerakote project, frankensteined 336 take-down in a few weeks to give it some new life.

baked cerakote should have an ideal dry film thickness of .001" so, of course, on any mating parts, you will end up with a potential minimum increase of .002" its generally the practice to scuff-sand a bit off the finish to get parts to fit back., or not paint at all if possible on crazy tight tolerances. Not to "paint less" in those areas. (you get into proper film thickness issues for correct curing if its applied too thin.)

I do try NOT to paint internals if i have the choice. it takes a lot of wearing off to get it back to normal clearances. and you'll be cleaning cerakote residue out for weeks as it slowly gets rubbed down from the moving parts.. same with screw holes, I ALWAYS plug them, just a little bit of it in the threads will really jam them up quick and you'll often have to re-tap the holes especially with really small and fine threads.

You wanna see someone throw a fit.. hand me a 1911 slide that someone cerakoted inside and out AND inside the female slide cuts. That had to be the biggest nightmare 4 hour job getting that out of the slide cuts to get the slide to fit again..
😤
 
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Pictures would help with any advice you will be given.
I have had a couple of 336s, that had pitting from neglect. I was able to remove the surface rust with an all copper coin and then used Flitz metal polish to bring back some luster.
As had been stated, cerakoting can be difficult to remove if not applied to the parts correctly. Maybe some elbow grease and gun oil will remove the rust, followed by rebluing by a competent gunsmith. I am sure that would make the rifle much nicer than what I imagine it looks like.
Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hey, Guys thanks for your suggestions will google and see what I come up with.

Flatsneck, after my ordeal with the 9422m, I was thinking very much down the lines you suggest. No Creakote to the internal or bearing surfaces, which are all unaffected by rust, the action is real slick, probably been tuned by a professional by the look of the internals, so wouldn't want to interfere with it too much.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
After the advice to google the strip-down of a1895 and watching it being done, I set too and stripped mine. Easy peasy, now to the Ceracoter in the morning. Spent much of the afternoon polishing the action's flat sides, with wet and dry, where the rust had been removed. The bluing was stuffed anyway, got a nice smooth finish. Once the Cerakoter has bead blasted the action and applied the coating I don't think we will see the aftermath of any rusting. Hopefully. Will post again once the rifle has returned from the Ceratoking in about a week and a half.
 

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What color are you going with?
 

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It has got to be pretty bad before you can't blue it ... This stuff was pretty deep and been working for about 40 years ...

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Discussion Starter #13
It has got to be pretty bad before you can't blue it ... This stuff was pretty deep and been working for about 40 years ...

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The question was not whether I could blue or should I Cerakote that was a no brainer, blueing was $600.00 at my local gunsmith and Cerakoting a mere $150.00 elsewhere. I just needed to know the if there were any pitfalls in Creakoting a lever gun due to the tolerances etc. But thanks for your input and the old Winnie came up well.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hi fellas the Cerakote is finished and I put her back together and there were no spare parts and the action cycles so I must have done sumfin right lol. Thanks for your input I feel a little more confident with pulling it apart now lol.
 

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Hey Mick, looks great! Does cerakote have a textured finish or matte? Not seen it in person. Where in Paradise are you?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Hey Mick, looks great! Does cerakote have a textured finish or matte? Not seen it in person. Where in Paradise are you?
Hi Boris, I chose a matte finish but it does come gloss as well. I live outside Gympie Qld.
 
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