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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I guess I should have figured it ahead of time, but I like the gun and thought it needed to be a secondary on my hog hunt. I used my 45-70 carrying all this last weekend, hoping I would get to use my Mountain mold 405gr. gas checked monster. Hog sign was everywhere, but were just not seeing anything. They were obviously out at night. Previously, we would get to see them at dusk when we were just about out of light. We baited and then waited till after dark, and because it was raining, used my Ruger Mark 2 in stainless. Shot came directly after my buddy landed one with his 7 mag. I shot as he was dissapearing into the tall grass. It amounted to a running lead that was cut off by trees. I had to shoot in the pelvis. He then started dragging himself away and I shot ( I had repositioned myself) at the front end. Got to do double shoulders. He went down on this shot for good. I had virtually no meat left. Pelvic shot had blown s#*t all over creation. Hams, and back meat totally contaminated. Chest shot blew bone fragments everywhere as well. I got maybe 3 # of meat off a 220# boar. I am very dissapointed, but half-way expected this. I was hunting primarily with the 45-70 and cast because of a blown up deer from an 06 I had hunted with a couple of years ago. Live and learn. I might now need a 45-70SS with the plastic stocks. I hate getting a good gun wet! I also hate wasting good meat. This was not a closed hunt, we were going after varmints. The owner of the property wants them all gone. He usually leaves them where they lay. It is hard for me to ruin perfectly good meat. I am not so sure this one would have been that good too eat, however.
 
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You have run right smack dab into the Magnum splat factor! :) Too light of a bullet into a heavy animal will cause quite a bit of disruption. Try a heavier controlled expansion round. But I think that may be a bit too much gun for the application anyway. Unless your shots are very long. Usually on the short range heavy stuff a large bore, slower moving bullet will work better. Although I have had great success on Boar with a 30-06 as well. But my favorite is either the .44Mag or .357Mag. Just don't shoot them in the head. It makes them mad! LOL! :)
 

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I am curious as to what bullet you used in the .338.A good premium 250 grain like a A-frame would be perfect for hogs.The cheaper factory bullets in any caliber tend to blow up and make a mess like the Federal Classic ammo in 300 Mag I tried once and only once.

Jayco.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
While I used a relatively soft bullet, I was able to retrieve it. It was a 225gr. Hornady spire point. The problem was hitting bone. I was only 50 yards away and when hitting the bone, had multiple projectiles moving through. They did what 50 rounds would have done. Exploded. I also hit ribs going into and out of the chest. The round is simply too much for the application. The bullet did not fragment, but did deform to a flat mushroom. You never stop learning. I did see something similar when I last took a Texas heart shot at long distance with an 06. It simply tore the doe up and some of the fragments even went so far as to go to one shoulder. Broken bones can make for deadly projectiles. The bison I used the same load on was not torn up, and believe me the bison is more dense than this hog was. She went down with minimal destruction. I think that any bullet would have done this destruction given the circumstances.
 
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