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I am looking for a cast .35 rem bullet. I am wanting to buy the mold and make my own like I do for my revolvers. I have used the 158, but I am want in bullets that are heavier.

What say yall.

Mold, wieght, design of bullet, gas checked, etc. are the items I am wanting to investigate. What are yalls favorites?


Thanks
 

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Try the RCBS #35-200-FN. It's a 200 gr. flat nosed gas checked bullet that should be just what you're looking for. It's good for the .35 Rem.,.358 Win. and .35 Whelen.
Paul B.
 
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I have and use the 200gr RCBS mold, it does well. have even killed a deer with that bullet :D Also have an older Lyman mold for a 215gr SWC gas check bullet, for the 357 that also works well in the 35 REM :!:
 

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Scott Young said:
I am looking for a cast .35 rem bullet. I am wanting to buy the mold and make my own like I do for my revolvers. I have used the 158, but I am want in bullets that are heavier.

What say yall.

Mold, wieght, design of bullet, gas checked, etc. are the items I am wanting to investigate. What are yalls favorites?


Thanks
Scott,
I've been using 2 Saeco molds, they do a 200gr and 245gr, both checked,
in my 356Win, haven't taken anything with them, but either in the right spot would do for deer. Personally for hunting purposes I'd load up the 245, I'm currently pushing avg of 1928fps. The 1:16 twist I believe in the 35Rem should stabilise fine according to Greenhill. With cast I believe as heavy as possible is the go. Here's a link to the various Saeco molds available.
http://www.redding-reloading.com/PDF files/bulletchart.pdf
Cheers,
R*2
 

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I use an old Ideal 180 grain FN mold. It's also for the .357, but makes great plain base bullets for my .35 Rem.
 
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Good rule to follow when one starts casting : if you like the mold buy it , one can never own to many molds :!: Also if it doesn't work in the gun you purchased it for 9 times out of 10 , you will have a gun later that will like it :D
 

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I have the Lyman 204 grain gaschecked bullet mold. I like this bullet a lot. It usually weighs a little more than it's advertised weight when I cast with wheelweight lead. I have used various lubes. They all seem to work about the same for me. Killed lots of deer and paper targets with it. It works. Back when I got my .35, This was the only rifle bullet mold available that I saw. It has worked wonderfully for me. I like the RCBS bullet mold too, but I see no need to have both. I bet it's a great shooter too.
 

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.35 MARLIN,
Only one mould? I have many from 125 to 245 that work great in my 35 Marlins. I also have a 290 gr bullet mould I haven't tried yet. You can never have too many moulds. Each one has it's own purpose. The 200 and 245 Gr FN seem to work the best for hunting. Mark
 

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I have other molds too in .357-.358 diameter. Mostly for pistol. Wadcutters and semi-wadcutters. The 168 grain SWC plain base bullet works well too. I just happen to like the way the 206 grain rn bullet performs so well that it is the one I use for hunting deer and since cost of production is so low, I use it for plinking too. Nothing wrong with the other brands of molds. I'd like to shoot the RCBS 200 FP some too but I think I'll get similar results as with the Lyman. I might get one someday just to have another one.

The .35 works so well with cast bullets, I think any of them would be good choices as long as it has enough nose contour to keep the cartridge feeding properly.

Has anyone ever tried the 158 RN mold that is the old standard design for the .38 special? I think that would be a great plinking or small game-varmint bullet.
 

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Something very important, most especially if your rifle is Microgroove, is the diameter of the bullet. Marlin barrels can run to the oversize very often, and bullets casting to diameters of .357 and .358 are undersized for most rifles.

I spent some time proving this again when trying to get a Lee 158 Tumble Lube SWC (.38-.357 pistol bullet) to shoot in my Marlins, both Microgroove, one of 80's vintage and another manufactured in 2003. It just would not provide the accuracy I needed, and undersize was the culprit. The bullets measured .358, occasionally .3585."

This is the major reason why some shooters never can get their Marlins to shoot lead, and the cure is very simple. Get a mould that throws bullets of larger diameter. If choosing a diameter most likely to succeed, I would suggest .360." If you cannot be sure that your mould will throw a bullet of the needed diameter beforehand, you might inquire of the manufacturer to see if they will select a mould from their production run that will cast to a larger diameter. Some manufacturers will do this for a slight extra cost, and it's a lot better than trying to make an undersize bullet shoot, which is simply impossible and will result in endless frustration.

I also vote for the RCBS 200 FN, and they stand behind their products. If the one you buy doesn't shoot, return it to them and they will exchange it for another of larger diameter.

This reply is a little late, but the problem of undersize bullets is something you very likely will encounter when loading for a Marlin, or many other rifles for that matter. Pistol bullet moulds can work, but they tend to cast a little smaller than some others and correct diameter is less likely to be obtained with them than some purpose-built .35 caliber rifle bullets.

Avoid undersized cast bullets like the plague.
 

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What .35 remington said is very true. If your rifle does not mark the bullet well, it will not shoot that bullet well. My rifle marks .358 bullets really sharp. I've never slugged it and measured it though. I guess I'm just lucky I have a tight, slick bore in my rifle.

I once had an old 6.5 Jap. rifle in my collection. The bore was rough and worn. It measured .269. Jacketed bullets were .264. It would shoot the 160 grain jacketed .264 bullet OK though, but it wouldn't shoot any other jacketed bullet well at all. It shot the 140 Lyman cast bullet, left unsized but lubed very well. Seems like it would measure .266 as cast. Was a long time ago and I traded that rifle to one of my buddies for a pistol.

The bullet has got to fit or it wont group well no matter how hard you try to make it.
 

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.35 Marlin, I've had surplus rifles like that myself. Luckily, some of the bullet moulds intended for the .303, etc. often fit oversize .30's that are supposed to be .308."

I got lucky and got a Lee wadcutter mould that casts the 148 grain bullet (not tumble lube, the other one) at .361" out of wheelweights plus a little tin. I had to size them to .358" to be able to use them in my revolvers, but I was so happy to get one that cast to this size that I don't mind the extra hassle, since as cast it's perfect for my Marlin .35. A full wadcutter makes a darn good small game bullet. The big flat point slaps the critters hard and drops them right away but doesn't ruin too much meat.
 

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The RCBS 35-200 FN is a stellar perfomer in my 1972 Marlin 336 35 rem microgroove wit 12 grs of Green Dot.

The only bullet that shoots well in that rifle I've found and I'm stickn' with it.. :wink:
 

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thanks,,,,I'm thinking about trying one of LEE's tumble lube bullets in the RN version for some plinking and small critter shooting.
 
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