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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,

I'm new to the forum but I've been lurking around for a while and it seems like there are some knowledgeable people on here. I recently purchased a used 1894C .357 carbine in stainless steel. I love the gun, but I've been having feeding problems with it. After searching the forums it looks like a good number of people have been through this with these rifles, there is a great write up about it here: http://www.marlinowners.com/forums/index.php?topic=80685.0
One of the most common fixes is removing the extractor, filing it down, and weakening the spring. Today I tried to do that on my gun and found that I cannot remove the extractor retaining pin no matter how hard I try! I had a cheap little punch that I use to push out pins on all my other firearms and I hammered the pin on this gun so hard I actually blunted it! I have never needed to hammer a pin out with even a fraction of the force I was using today and the pin still hasn't moved a millimeter. Is there some kind of trick to this, or a special type of punch I need? Or should I just bite the bullet and send it in to Marlin for repair? I love this gun and will not part with it, but double clutching the lever on almost every single round is driving me nuts. I really want to get this thing fixed. Any advice is greatly appreciated.
 

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Sometimes, those pins can be contankerous.

Anyhow, it should drive out easiest by during the bolt upside down and punching it out from the bottom side which will drive the pin out from the top side.

These pins have a two-tit knarl which is on the top side, or should be if placed correctly from the factory.

Once you get the pin out about 1/8", the knarled tits should clear the bolt and come out easy.


..........Widder
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks so much guys, thanks to your help I got it out tonight! I really appreciate it. I have never seen a pin as stubborn as this one, but I finally got it out. Now time to work on the extractor and see if I can't get these feeding problems solved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, I followed the guide to the best of my ability, bent the extractor spring to reduce tension, polished the extractor, etc. etc. and my 1894css still has feeding issues. The feeding issues are somewhat improved, but they are still there. At this point I am seriously thinking about sending it to Marlin for service. Problem is, I bought the rifle used so it's not under warranty. In addition, it's one of the last JM stamped guns, produced before they moved their factory. I am sure it's unlikely, but I'd hate to send it in for service and have them replace it with a remlin. What do you guys think? Any other things I should try before I send it in? Anyone sent in an out of warranty marlin for repair? How reasonable was the cost / turn around time? Thanks in advance!
 

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I would look carefully at the rim of the chamber for any burrs. My 44 mag had a slight burr there, I couldn't actually see it because of my eyesight, but could feel it with a tiny screwdriver. I knew something was up because my brass was getting nicked up and I could feel the cartridge drag a bit on chambering. Might be worth looking at. and very easy to clean up if it is so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well I've come to the conclusion I have neither the skill nor the patience to deal with these feeding issues. Another project has come up that I need funds for so this rifle has to go. I am asking $650 shipped OBO. PM me for pics or details. Thanks!
 
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