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Try this. I had a book back then, 25 yrs back. Lost it in the Harvey flood. Leave plenty of head space as not to break the jar.
 

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Google the Ball Blue Book of Canning. It’ll have all the times and pressures you need. And it will show you how to adjust for your altitude.
 

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Welcome to the forum, and best of luck with the canning!
 

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I make pickles but don't use pressure. I have a long and convoluted method but it makes sense to me.
 
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Get the Blue Book of Canning. Pressure canning is faster and safer than water bath, depending on what you're putting up. I don't see that the Presto instruction booklet is available, but here is their information on-line:

And here is from the US Department of Agriculture:

Don't forget that canning meat is also an option. If the power goes out and the freezer stops running you still have protein available. We did that when we lived off-grid; canned everything.

We can a lot of our garden veggies. It's a pain to do, especially when the kitchen is hot already, but it is s-o-o satisfying to look at those cases of food. Kinda like having the Winter's firewood cut and stacked and you can sit back and say "I'm ready!"

~Kees~
 

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Well, you got pressure canning and water bath canning, plus altitude in the mix. My wife is a professional at both. I am not. Just educate yourself, because you can make a tasteless oderless jar of viddles that will be toxic if you do it wrong. The toxic scare comes mostly with canning meat, which should be done in a pressure canner. If you're an organized person that can follow directions, you'll be fine. Just be aware of the risks involved.
 

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Get the Blue Book of Canning. Pressure canning is faster and safer than water bath, depending on what you're putting up. I don't see that the Presto instruction booklet is available, but here is their information on-line:

And here is from the US Department of Agriculture:

Don't forget that canning meat is also an option. If the power goes out and the freezer stops running you still have protein available. We did that when we lived off-grid; canned everything.

We can a lot of our garden veggies. It's a pain to do, especially when the kitchen is hot already, but it is s-o-o satisfying to look at those cases of food. Kinda like having the Winter's firewood cut and stacked and you can sit back and say "I'm ready!"

~Kees~
Took a great course a few years back through Cornell Cooperative Ext. On canning meat. The main focus was on venison, but you could apply the same process to any type of meat. They cook us some samples they made in the previous years class at tue end of the course. Best venison I ever had! The canning process really tenderizes the meat and takes alot of the gameness out out it. Great for people who aren't big on the taste of game meat.

To the OP, definately check times and pressures for your altitude. Make sure to add some citirc acid to help with shelf life as beans a much less acid than canning something like tomatoes.

We mostly do jams and fruits and occasionally some pickles. All of these can be done in an easy water bath. Would definately use a pressure canner for beans, meats or otherwise.
 

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My mother has always canned the old fashion way. No that she had gone to a nursing home, I'm going to try my hand at it. Can you send me canning times for green beans in quarts jars.
The Ball “Blue book” is your best friend when in comes to canning! Also if your using a pressure canner ( strongly recommended) make sure all gaskets, seals, gauges are in proper working order. If you have ANY doubt about your old equipment, go buy new!
 
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