Marlin Firearms Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone know what the power rating is for the Camp 45 hammer strut spring? Wolff Springs only lists the recoil springs (with poundage) for sale. I'm curious about replacing my 'factory' hammer spring with a 'reduced power' spring, in order to lighten the trigger pull weight. I'd rather not get into cutting springs and testing for effect. If I knew the power rating of the factory hammer strut spring, I could trial lower power rated springs of similar size/shape from Wolff Springs, for example, say from a Ruger Blackhawk or SuperRed Hawk of same/similar caliber. In my attempts to lower Camp 45's trigger pull (initially > 8 lb), I have removed the magazine-trigger disconnector, polished the hammer/sear/disconnector and these actions get a trigger pull of 7 lb 2 oz). I have not altered the trigger return spring as I do not have a replacement if botched. Appreciate any thoughts and suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
After sleeping over the problem, I suspect that the original Marlin shop simply used a hammer strut spring of similar length and power as they had on-hand for use in the 1894 lever guns. It is simple enough to replace hammer strut spring and check if the trigger pull weight was affected and demonstrate safety checks with dummy rounds. Then, off to the range to check for misfires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Remove the hammer strut spring from your weapon or if you have a factory spare spring, it can act as your guide. With calipers, measure 1) overall relaxed length of spring, 2) thickness of the coil, 3) ID (inner diameter) of the spring, 4) OD (outer diameter) of the spring, 4) number of active coils, 5) with measurements 2 and 4, you will get an idea of the periodicity of the coils, and 6) I measured the "compressed" length of the spring, as it was compressed in situ. Based upon these measurements, I purchased compression spring stock from McMaster-Carr. Look for a spring that essentially has the same thickness and length that will give the same amount of "active coils". Obviously, the ID must fit over the hammer strut. I had a spare factory spring and measured its length to cut my initial relaxed length on the purchased stock spring. Obviously, this length was slightly longer than my current hammer strut spring (in the weapon) given it was new. I heat-treated the ends, compressed the last two coils together and flattened them with a sander. Since the periodicity of the coils was slightly different from the spring in the weapon, I had to cut one coil from the spring I constructed. That worked beautifully. It's all about Hooke's Law (F= -kx) , you know. :) Again, in summation: the ID has to fit over the strut. The OD and overall relaxed length, cannot be too great that bending of the spring on the strut will cause bending of the spring and binding along the sides. If you use a spring whose thickness is smaller than the original factor spring, then that factor changes the # or active coils, length, etc which effectively will change the force (torque) imposed upon the hammer. The concept I used was essentially similar to the applied application I used for all of my Marlin lever guns. That process was simple, in that I purchased REDUCED POWER springs from Wolff springs. Noting the changes in those springs, lead me to the above described process. Additionally, use coffee and motrin for the headache that will be induced looking over hundreds of compression springs with all the variable dimensions. Best wishes and good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Additional Safety point: I stress that you will need a wire thickness very similar to the factory thickness in order to mimic the force necessary to generate faithful detonation of the primer and safely keep the hammer cocked. For example, I initially tried springs of thickness 0.032 to 0.035" thickness; my thinking was thinner wire = weaker strength = reduced trigger pull weight. This is true however these springs would barely or not at all keep the hammer cocked with absolutely no change in disconnector spring or assembly! You can make the hammer strut spring too weak to be effective or safe. As Bill Geiselle (Geiselle Automatics) says in his videos: a trigger (the quality and pull weight) is a relative perception. Meaning, it all depends what you are used to firing and what purpose that weapon system is used for. Combat/LE vs hunting vs long range target
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top