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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This has probally been asked a million times before, but in your guys opinions how important really is it to be fully camoed? This is my first year at trying to be fully decked out , Ive read a lot on how important this is. I have had success in the past, not fully camoed. Is this captain camo overrated? I'm planning to go out next Saturday and see, if it matters I always use my bow for taking turkeys.
 

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I think camo helps but it's not everything, depends on the situation. The key is to be as sent free as possible and not move a lot where a Turkey can see you. I think the most important thing in Turkey hunting is you need to blend into your surroundings. Like for instance if you are leaning up against a big oak tree you might want to be wearing gray to match the trunk of the tree, not necessarily camo. I'm sure others will chime in too.
 

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I have found movement to be the biggest factor when chasing turkey, which makes a successful turkey hunter with a bow my hero. Being inside of a blind is one thing, but bow hunting turkey without one is indeed a challenge. You do need to blend into your surroundings, but even the best guillie suit out there won't cover up sudden moves. I'd say if you have already taken turkey with a bow without the full blown camo, then you're good to go. Skilled woodsmanship and patience will take you a lot further than the top name camo outfit. Looking forward to photos of your next successful hunt.
 
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Camp will help but the real key is movement. Turkey's eyes are on par with a hawks eyes. No need to worry about sent well bird hunting because birds have no sense of smell. My grandma use to mix here bird seeds with crushed red peppers to keep the squirrels out of her bird feeders and squirrels stayed away and birds of all kinds including Turkey's didn't mind one bit.
 
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In my experience it is more about the hat and necktie than the camo pattern.

turkey-hunting.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies to everyone. I keep y'all posted on my failures or successes. I've seen many big toms around, unfortunately on private land , I have a spot I want to go to on some blm land I'm hoping can produce. I haven't scouted for beans this year, that's a big negative against me. But.... We'll see .
 
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I've always thought camo to be very important while turkey hunting, but an experience while deer hunting one time made me wonder. I was leaning against a big pine tree while wearing the legally required hunter orange vest. A flock of turkeys literally fed all around me and didn't see me. I'm sure if I had made the slightest move they would have left - in a hurry!
 
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I religiously wear camo while hunting but with the knowledge that others have done it in red plaid woolrich coats with the same positive results. It's all about sitting still when you are visible. Eye movement can spook a turkey. I have shot only one deer without having at least three cigarette butts stuffed into the bark of the tree I'm sitting in. That was a doe impromptu harvested from my deck.

Several years ago while doe hunting in a ground blind a flock of 9 turkeys meandered up to the blind. I had the zippered door and all the windows open. The majority of them came within a foot of the blind while one of them took a step into the doorway and stood there jerking its head around looking inside. I was literally within arm's reach. One step further and that tom would have bumped into my knee. Since I was inside the camo blind I was wearing an orange sweatshirt and jeans for the walk back to the truck at dusk. He satisfied his curiosity and sauntered off with the rest of them, ignorant of my existence. Thankfully my wife was sitting in the chair next to me in the blind as a witness. She was wearing a pink camo sweatshirt.
 

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I "shot" this hen at about 15 yards with my old Kodak 3mp camera. I was standing on a two track in blue jeans and a camo shirt. She did not even look my way for any length of time until I shifted my position.
[URL="http://
 
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Remember, Pop and Grand Pop never had camo, clothes or guns, maybe we've been sold a "bill of goods" by the sporting goods companies. Grand Pop used jeans and flannel, and old single shot Winchester 37 16GA and always got the goods, turkey and deer.
 
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in my group of hunting partners, a buddy of mine brought his girlfriend along on a dove hunt.
he had been taking her to the skeet range for several weeks prior to a planned hunt and he had bought her the latest & greatest camo pattern outfit on the market at that time
on the day of the hunt, she decided that the camo did not look good on her and she actually wore a pair of skin tight jeans, high heeled boots and a FLOURESCENT PINK tank top to the field.
she actually shot over 20 birds that morning
lost all faith in need for camo that day
 

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I'm glad this question was asked. I'm wanting to learn how to turkey hunt and was kinda wondering the same thing. Lots of good info here!
 

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I suppose some has to do with what you are doing, weapons used, game etc., but I happen to always wear camo and think it better then none, including a 3/4 face net and gloves. I've noticed over all the years that having my face obscured, hands too, has allowed me to get much closer to game than without; as if it takes them longer to visually figure me out... if noticing at all. But as mentioned above think movement is key, background and shadow, and try to "make like a statue" if not on the move, ha!. I also try to keep my bow "vertical" when still, sitting, etc., having seen game spook easy when say the bow is laying across your lap or something when needing it if you know what I mean. I try to keep it "at the ready" as much as possible to avoid Murphy's Law, not have to swing it around, and/or lift it far and all that so to say; again as little movement as possible. To be honest, I'm not sure "using the wind" is as important for Turkey as it is for Deer or Elk etc., but always use it to my advantage when stalking etc.; habit I guess. Anyway, some of the things I try to keep in mind when out there. My first Turkey ever was taken with an old Jennings wheel bow, good luck to you.
 

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Camo is a good thing but movement is #1,I like having my back to a tree to help blend in.Good luck!
 
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