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I just purchased a new 1894c in 357 mag, I love the rifle. Looking for alternative options to peep sights & standard sights. Has anyone mounted the Burris Fastfire 3!, I use my 1894c for silhouette shooting from 25-300 meters & deer hunting. When target shooting, I to need to adjust for different ranges.

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The Fastfire 3 is a great little optic but I would mount it forward instead of over the receiver. I mounted a Fastfire 3 on the back of a Garand receiver. It was great at pistol shooting distances but on anything over 50 yards the parallax was HUGE. I believe it was designed for pistol use. I still have the one I removed from the Garand. I like it enough that I am considering mounting it on my 10mm Kimber longslide. Mounting it forward of the 1894 receiver should work out well.
 

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I just purchased a new 1894c in 357 mag, I love the rifle. Looking for alternative options to peep sights & standard sights. Has anyone mounted the Burris Fastfire 3!, I use my 1894c for silhouette shooting from 25-300 meters & deer hunting. When target shooting, I to need to adjust for different ranges.

Thank you,
If you are like me this will become your favorite gun. I love mine and regret waiting so long to buy it. I bought mine in 2002 and should have bought one years before. But these are not long range guns. The bullets are short and fat, sorta like certain world leaders and they loose forward speed pretty quick. But for the ranges they are good for they are a hoot to get some range time with.

And if you are shooting out to 300 yards then yes, you will have to adjust for different ranges. No matter if you are using a scope or a red dot. The 357 round is NOT a flat shooting round when used for that range. Even a 30-06 will need holdover or adjustment at 300 yards. But not near as much as a 357 will. You may want to consider a scope with Mil Dots on the vertical wire that will have built in hold over points and then see where each dot impacts at extended ranges.
 
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I looked up some trajectories for you. If you have a 158gr bullet with a start velocity of 1600fps, about what you will get with factory loaded ammo and sight in for 100 yards you will be around 2.5" high at 50 yards and down 40 inches at 250 yards. My chart didn't go to 300 yards but I bet you will lose another 10 inches. Maybe more at 300 yards.

If you handload you can push the 158gr bullet to around 1800fps and with a 100 yard zero you will be just under 2" high at 50 and 32" low at 250 yards. Not a whole lot better. With that kind of drop you may not have enough field of view in the red dot for 300 yard shooting. I'm not sure on that because I don't own one. Most consider pistol caliber rifles as 100 yard guns or maybe 150 yard guns. Yes they will shoot further than that but they are risky to be shooting at game past that range. The animals deserve better than to be wounded and allowed to run off and die unfound because or poor shooting.
 
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I have Fastfires on three woods hunting rigs and think they're well suited to that purpose, but if winning silhouette matches is important to you there are far better choices.





Vooch

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I have used a Fast Fire 3 on my 1894, worked fine, have since mounted a 1-4 Viper PST on that particular rifle. Have two Fast Fire 3's that have been riding the slides of a Glock 40 MOS and Glock 41 MOS for easily a total of 2000 rounds and they have held up just fine.

For a rifle, Burris sells a mount with side protection (wings) providing excellent protection for the sight.


As I age, however gracefully or not, I find red dots and illuminated scope reticules a great aid!!!!
 

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The Fastfire 3 is a great little optic but I would mount it forward instead of over the receiver. I mounted a Fastfire 3 on the back of a Garand receiver. It was great at pistol shooting distances but on anything over 50 yards the parallax was HUGE. I believe it was designed for pistol use. I still have the one I removed from the Garand. I like it enough that I am considering mounting it on my 10mm Kimber longslide. Mounting it forward of the 1894 receiver should work out well.
Parallax is when you move your head at different angles to the optics dot or crosshairs ,the point of impact changes.On a red dot scope or reflex sight there is no parallax.It does not matter how you look at the dot,it will shoot to the same place.OB
 
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I have a Fastfire II on my Ruger Mark II, fantastic for quick shots...I actually got times in the low 5's for bowling pins. Would like the III so I don't have to sight it in everytime I change batteries.

The Leupold delta point is better for distant shooting as you can sight in at the top of the triangle instead of a dot.

Plus at distance that tiny dot covers about 4 feet...not to good for hunting.
 

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I use the Fast Fire 3 on a tactical shotgun and a Glock 40 in 10MM.It is a very sturdy sight,but I have not used it past 100 yards.I bought the 3 Minute Dot.
 

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I have used Dot optics on pistols and rifles. I find the 3 - 2 MOA dot to large for long range precise shooting. Its awesome for fast hundered yard or under shooting. JMHO
 

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Parallax is when you move your head at different angles to the optics dot or crosshairs ,the point of impact changes.On a red dot scope or reflex sight there is no parallax.It does not matter how you look at the dot,it will shoot to the same place.OB
That's the red dot's selling point but, sorry to say, it just isn't so in real application.

Red dot sights are made with an offset illumination source and, therefore, are subject to POA shifts due to parallax.

Line Diagram Parallel


ALL red dot/holographic sights exhibit parallax to some extent. It's minimal with some makes and horrid with others. The Fastfire has more than most.
Here the parallax of some different red dot sights is compared. Red dot sight POA shift due to parallax is incontrovertible.


The closer the sight is to the eye, the greater the apparent shift. That is why I saw so much POA shift when I mounted the Fastfire 3 on the rear of my Garand receiver, just in front of my eye. It was horrid! However, I experimented with the sight and found that when held 14" from my eye, about where it would be on my pistol, the shift was almost imperceptible.
 

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I put a 4x scope on mine as the dot just dosen't cut it beyond 25 yards if you want to shoot accurate.
 
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That's the red dot's selling point but, sorry to say, it just isn't so in real application.

Red dot sights are made with an offset illumination source and, therefore, are subject to POA shifts due to parallax.

View attachment 719980

ALL red dot/holographic sights exhibit parallax to some extent. It's minimal with some makes and horrid with others. The Fastfire has more than most.
Here the parallax of some different red dot sights is compared. Red dot sight POA shift due to parallax is incontrovertible.


The closer the sight is to the eye, the greater the apparent shift. That is why I saw so much POA shift when I mounted the Fastfire 3 on the rear of my Garand receiver, just in front of my eye. It was horrid! However, I experimented with the sight and found that when held 14" from my eye, about where it would be on my pistol, the shift was almost imperceptible.
  • Bright red dot allows for fast target acquisition and easy aiming
  • Compact and lightweight, so it won’t affect firearm balance or handling
  • 1x magnification allows both-eyes-open shooting, for enhanced awareness and target acquisition
  • Parallax-free, for better accuracy
  • Mounts to almost anything—including handguns, rifles, and shotguns—using Burris mounting systems
  • Automatic brightness sensor adjusts brightness to match the environmental conditions; also features 3 manual brightness settings
  • Windage and elevation adjustments make optic fine-tuning easy; no special tool required
  • High-grade optical glass provides excellent brightness and clarity, with lasting durability
  • Index-matched, Hi-Lume® multicoating provides low-light performance and glare elimination
  • Waterproof
  • Shockproof design stands up to years of punishing recoil
  • CR1632 battery included
  • Battery access is conveniently located on the top of the sight
  • Comes with our Burris Forever Warranty™


  • 3-MOA dot size (300234, 300235 only)
  • 8-MOA dot size (300236, 300237 only)
  • Includes Picatinny mount for mounting on rifles, handguns, and tactical shotguns (300234, 300236 only)
  • Optic only; does not include mount (300235, 300237 only)
Here is a feature list of a Fast fire III.Notice being parallax free is one of the things noted.I doubt than any optic is 100% parallax free ,but your video supposedly showing parallax is flawed.If what ever your have the sight mounted on is zeroed for what ever range you have there,no matter where you move your head or the camera and it appears the dot is moving,it is not moving and the bullet will strike where it is originally aimed at.Try it out and report back.OB
 
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.........Here is a feature list of a Fast fire III.Notice being parallax free is one of the things noted.I doubt than any optic is 100% parallax free ,but your video supposedly showing parallax is flawed.If what ever your have the sight mounted on is zeroed for what ever range you have there,no matter where you move your head or the camera and it appears the dot is moving,it is not moving and the bullet will strike where it is originally aimed at.Try it out and report back.OB
I never said it was a bad optic. Quite the opposite.It has many good features and is a great sight for the intended uses when mounted on pistols or on rifles when mounted with scout rifle eye relief.

Optical instrument


I own one. I mounted it on the rear receiver of a Garand. I zeroed it, No matter how much this old ex-service rifle competitor and EIC recipient tried, the best I could do was about 4" groups at 50 yards, and most were bigger. So, I set my rifle down on a table, moved it to what looked like perfect aim on a 50 yard (the "zero" distance) target, and then proceeded to move my eye a couple of inches left, right, up, and down. Understand, that I had read the "no parallax" claim and bought into it. So, I was very surprised to find that at 5-6 inches of eye relief the unit displayed horrendous parallax.

So, as I have said, I have one, I shot with it, I tested it, and I can 100% attest to three things. First, it is a very good little sight for a pistol or scout rifle. Second, that it would be a good little sight for in-home or other close-in defense where the effects of parallax don't work over enough distance to make them meaningful. And, third, that it is not a good choice for mounting on the rear of a hunting rifle unless you are happy with 8 MOA of accuracy.

For the doubters and strict adherents to manufacturer's advertising claims, if I must do it to support my case, I will pull the dang thing out and photograph just how bad the parallax is when the sight is 6" from the eye.

Again, I'm not bashing the sight, just pointing out the worst and best ways to mount it.
 
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