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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Picked up a waffle top 336 A in 30-30. It didn't have a bullseye so I acquired a few. I've never done this before. What is the best way to do this?

Per the attached pics, did someone try to fill the hole or are they really just that shallow? Before I start free-hand-drilling, was hoping some members could advise best way to do this.

It appears to me a prior owner filled the hole-unless they really were this shallow...
 

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It does look a bit shallow to me but I can not tell if the wood is the same as the stock. When I replaced one I did deepen the whole a little so I wouldn't have to do much work on the bullseye after installing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It does look a bit shallow to me but I can not tell if the wood is the same as the stock. When I replaced one I did deepen the whole a little so I wouldn't have to do much work on the bullseye after installing.
Thank you for the reply. Did you use a drill press or free hand it? Did you find a drill bit of comparable size to bullseye-just slightly smaller?
 

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Where did you get the bullseye’s from?
 

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Be sure to use the right style drill bit, fillson or something like that, cuts very smooth from the outside in the bullseye hole is smaller than it seems. Might be 5/16" or slightly larger, not 3/8". I would guess the factory drilling to be 3/8" deep. The new piece is going to be too long to allow you to shape it to the stock, careful shaping and fitting makes a nice look.

Sent from my SM-A505U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Be sure to use the right style drill bit, fillson or something like that, cuts very smooth from the outside in the bullseye hole is smaller than it seems. Might be 5/16" or slightly larger, not 3/8". I would guess the factory drilling to be 3/8" deep. The new piece is going to be too long to allow you to shape it to the stock, careful shaping and fitting makes a nice look.

Sent from my SM-A505U using Tapatalk
operative word: "careful"

also yes, the new inlays are way too long. The rifle shoots fine without the bullseye but I got it as a first project gun also and I'd like to fix her up a bit. Thank you for the reply.
 

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All the bullseyes I've replaced have been into holes which seemed incredibly shallow, as well. I usually take a dental pick type tool and clear out the old glue down in the bottom of the hole. This sometimes makes it deep enough for my preference with no drilling required. Then insert the new bullseye with epoxy or a thick super glue. File/sand flush and done.
 

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All of the replacement bullseye's I have used through the years have been long enough to get two out of. It is a lot easier to saw it in half than filing all of that down. The holes appear shallow, but usually plenty deep.
 

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I have replaced several, its very easy to do. That hole looks too shallow, I would find the right size bit and carefully remove a little at a time until you acheive the depth desired. I always cut the bullseye in two pieces, so the hole needs to be approx the depth of half the bullseye. Depending on which bullseye I use I have had to do a little sanding on the outside diameter in order to make it fit in the hole. You dont want to beat it in the hole if it to large, you risk splitting the stock. Before I glue it in I cover the area around the hole with blue painters tape. After I glue it in ( I use gorilla glue ) I let it dry over night then use a small file to match the contour of the stock. Make sure its flush and you are done.
 

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I have done several. You should clean out the filler with a small sharp tool. Then clean up the hole sides with a drill bit held in the fingers. You can cut the bulls eye in half and then bevel the inside edges slightly and press it into the hole after applying glue. You can tap it in as far as it goes. Then with a sharp knife or box cutter you can shape the bulls eve to fit the stock and finish it off with sandpaper. If you place tape around the hole it can protect the stock. A little oil will dress off the wood.

Good luck and let us know how it turns out.
 

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I've done 2 or 3, and all only needed half of the bullseye plug. If it appears that the hole is too small, put the bullseye in the freezer and it will shrink enough to go in easily. The tape on the stock is a great idea, especially when you get down to the final shaping.

Good luck, and please share your "after" pictures!
 

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Just finished putting this one in.
On a 1972 SG stock that had the BE replaced with a sling swivel.
It fit tight but the top of the hole is gouged but it evens out with red oil finsh
Brown Wood Table Material property Hardwood Wood Rim Automotive exterior Hardwood Bicycle part

Finished with Red Tong Oil.
I used 1/2 an inlay and there was plenty to shape to the stock.
Table Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain
 

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