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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recognize these? Some are still available, several are no longer made:




Heavy round nosed bullets seem to be losing favor with many folks. Is this a bad thing? Do you think we are going to regret our collective lack of support for them? Are we fooling ourselves by thinking we "need" pointy bullets? Do these bullets have advantages over the new stuff we will miss?

What do you think?
 

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I actually like round nose, or semi-point bullets for big game hunting.
 

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I think the round points carry a little more weight up front; that helps penetration and stability. Seems alot of people judge a round soley by its velocity so the pointed bullets are quite popular.
 

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The one I miss the most is the 215 gr. .312".
 

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Most devastating bullet I've ever used was the 150gn HP made by WW for the 30-30 I do miss that one for reloading. I do wish they would reintroduce the 150gn for the .32 special also. WW could do well if they made the jacketed bullet for reloading the 38-55, instead of the anemic factory fodder they produce.
 

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Wow, is it me or those things are "heavy for caliber"?? The one on the extreme right shows rifling but is in great shape for a recovery :lol:
 

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I'm with Swany. I used to shoot those HPs out of and iron sighted Win M94 30-30 as a high schooler in the early 1960s. I mostly used them to stillhunt groundhogs in creek bottom fields in mid-Missouri. It was good practice for deer hunting. Most targets were in the 50-100 yd. range. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Perferator said:
Wow, is it me or those things are "heavy for caliber"?? The one on the extreme right shows rifling but is in great shape for a recovery :lol:
Yep, They tend to be. :D I rather like heavy for caliber round nosed bullets in some applications. The 500 grainer on the right is a "hardened water" (not water hardened BTW- there's quite a difference) tested bullet. Sometimes ice doesn't have a huge effect on them. Of course a 500 never does get as much steam in a 45-70 as it was designed to be able to take.

I do regret the fact that Sierra is dropping so many of their RNs. I don't care what people "think" about Sierra bullets. They do work if used in the right applications and their RN tend to be quite tough due to the way they select lead alloys for their cores. The no-defunct 170 in 7mm was quite the tough bullet.
 

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Golsovia, what was the name of the Sierra bullets that you liked if you can remember? I have used Sierra's in the past a great deal but gave up on them in the early to mid 90's. I used 25 and 30 caliber Sierra's for deer hunting back then. I believe they were called Gamekings then as they are now. Life is good, BestLever
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
BL, The GameKings are boattailed bullets and that's mostly what they still have in their line, I suppose because that's what people buy. Their flat based hunting bullets, including both pointed and round nosed versions, are called Pro-Hunters I believe. They're good bullets for good shooters with good judgement, a lousy motto but fitting perhaps. The old round nosed designs were actually more forgiving I think in terms of terminal performance due to their toughness. They did lack a bit at very long range though because of their shape. I'm thinking it was appearance rather than performance which did them in.
 

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I agree with Golsovia. That 170 gr. Sierra 7mm round nose was perfect for the 7x57. I called Sierra about it and they say they would bring it back should there be enough people wanting it.
Another very good round nose bullet that was dropped way back in 1967 was the 275 gr. Hornady for the .35 Whelen. One hell of a stomper on big game. Sadly, they don't plan on bringing that one back. I'm going to be on the look out for a couple of boxes of the Sierra 180 gr. round nosed bullets as well. Out to 200 yards from my .308, they flat do a number on deer. Like bang/flop!
I got real lucky at a gun show about a years ago and found a fellow selling the 170 gr. Sierra round nosed bullets. he had five boxes still sealed for $10 a box. I offerred him $40 for the whole batch. We split the difference at $45. I'm a happy camper, Those bullets are amazingly accurate. I can put three shots into .375" consistantly from one of my 7x57 rifles and it don't kick the snot out of me. A good 2500 FPS is doable with careful handloading and as I like to get close to my game, they'll work just fine.
The one factory load I really miss is the Winchester 175 gr. 7x57 mauser load. That one has, to use John Taylor's term, a nice big blue nose. For those who don't know who he was, he was a famous ivory hunter/poached in the late 1940s-50s in what was Portuguese East Africa, later called Mozambique. federal still makes a 175 gr. RN for the 7x57, I think, or better yet, if you can find some. I think the opening for the lead in the nose of that bullet is a bit too small. I had one pencil through a der braodside and although three of us searched for that deer until sundown, we never did find it until three days later. That deer traveled over a mile from where it was shot. My thoughts are, if you use that Federal load, punch it through the shoulder and not behind it.
The fellow that had the 7mm bullets also had five boxes of the 220 gr. Sierra round nosed bullets. Guess who has them now? :D :D :D
Paul B.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Paul,

I'm glad you mentioned that 275 Hornady. Whenever I see that bullet in old data manuals I wish they would bring it back. That is a weight that, I think, would have a useful niche in the market. It would sure beat spending nearly $1 a pop for 280 or 310 Woodleighs to get heavy 35s.

As for the 30 cal 220s from Sierra, those seem like good bulllets too for 250 yard shots with the 30 cals. As far as I know, they are still in the Sierra line; those and the 180 RN I think. I had a M788 6mm which really liked the 100 SMP and that was the bullet I hunted with. I would be disappointed at its loss if I still had the rifle. I think we lost the better of two RN designs when Sierra dropped their 160 in .264 - we still have the Hornady. To their credit, Hornady still maintains most of their RN designs.
 

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Interesting thing about those Sierra 220 gr. RNs. I keep hearing all this BS about a 220 gr. bullet being way too heavy for the .308 Win. One day, I decided to see just what could be done with the .308 and 22.0 gr. bullets. In obe rifle, I reached 2300 FPS and groups of .375 to .50". HUH? Yup. While several of the other rifles I tested the load in only reached 2250 FPS, one did do the 2300 FPS. Think back on the history of the 30-06. When it first came out as the 30-03, the load was a 220 gr. bullet at a nominal 2300 FPS, later reduced to 2200 FPS because the powder used was highly erosive and ruined barrels in about 800 rounds.
W.D.M "Karamojo" Bell, slayer of 1,100 elephants, 800 of which were done the dirty deed with the 7x57 Mauser and 173 gr. FMJ bullets once opined that the .308 Win. with a 220 gr. FMJ bullet at about 2200 FPS would be, in his opinion, the perfect elephant gun. Seems like Bell didn't like recoil much. I guess that my point was,that 220 gr. bullet in the .308 would probably work about the same as the 173 gr. bullet in the 7x57. Interesting thoughts, yes? No?
I know that I've got to chase down a few boxes of the 180 gr. Sierra RNs before they disappear from the scene.
Paul B.
 
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