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I could be wrong, but I'm pretty sure the straight one works on a 336 if you pull the bolt out.
You are probably right. I chose the curved one because the Hornady web site pointed out it worked on all the actions. I have yet to try it on a lever gun. :) CJ
 

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I trim my 30-30 cases below minimum. So any bullet with a crimp groove that is where it will be. 30-30 when carefully crafted hand loads will produce outstanding accuracy. When learned it is a 300 yd deer rifle.
 

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I trim my 30-30 cases below minimum. So any bullet with a crimp groove that is where it will be. 30-30 when carefully crafted hand loads will produce outstanding accuracy. When learned it is a 300 yd deer rifle.
Hi Swany, I just want to make sure that I understand what you are saying. So you trim your case below minimum and still seat the bullet in the crimp groove, so if I understand what you are saying, your loads by design are going to be well short of the lands? Sorry, I just want to make sure I understand.

This is a great thread that I find very interesting. I have not been reloading very long so this is all good info. I trim my cases to 2.028" per my lyman book and my hand loads length is different depending on the bullet,
125 sierra gn fn/hp = 2.415"OAL,
Oregon Trail 170 gn fn= 2.515"OAL

As a comparison here is some factory ammo
140 gn Hornady Flex Tip 2.579" OAL,
160 gn Hornady flex tip 2.536" OAL,
170 Gn Fusion fn= 2.500"OAL,
150 gn Federal fn = 2.500"OAL,
170 gn Rem Core Loc RN = 2.495" OAL.
My lyman books says 2.550" is max OAL It also has very different OAL's listed for most of the reloads in it.
So my question is why aren't they all the same OAL for best consistency and hence best accuracy? Dang it :hmmmm: Now I have all these questions.
 

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Marlin bore dimensions and free bore measures vary quite a bit between model years and the pre and post ballard/micro groove years.
Cast bullet designs vary even more. For any of my guns 1893,36s and 336s, OAL is adjusted to be just short of the lands.
Touching the lands does nothing for hunting accuracy, and engraving lands is impractical (Pain in the butkus) with a lever gun;
 
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I could be wrong, but I'm pretty sure the straight one works on a 336 if you pull the bolt out.
+1, it will.
 

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Hey RHP, you said:

"Just an FYI if anybody tries one and can't find the caliber modified case you need, Hornady used an odd size thread, it's a 5/16" 36 NF tap."

Have you actually tried a tap that size?

Reason I ask is I took my tool into work and had our machinist measure the threads and he decided it wad probably a proprietary thread dimension a tad under the 5/16 size. He told me a 5/16 36 would probably work but thread engagement would be less than ideal. I ordered a tap that size but have not used it yet.
 

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Hi Swany, I just want to make sure that I understand what you are saying. So you trim your case below minimum and still seat the bullet in the crimp groove, so if I understand what you are saying, your loads by design are going to be well short of the lands? Sorry, I just want to make sure I understand.

This is a great thread that I find very interesting. I have not been reloading very long so this is all good info. I trim my cases to 2.028" per my lyman book and my hand loads length is different depending on the bullet,
My lyman books says 2.550" is max OAL It also has very different OAL's listed for most of the reloads in it.
So my question is why aren't they all the same OAL for best consistency and hence best accuracy? Dang it :hmmmm: Now I have all these questions.
Ron - you and everyone else who has ever "thought" about it have had the same questions. The short answer would be along the lines of "whatever you read in published print 'has to work' in 'all' production guns". I specify "production" as any gun built custom has the capacity to be non-standard and does not necessarily follow the rules. For that matter, many production guns fall off the radar and are non-standard. All of which is why I work on the premise that Data Manuals are great guides, but my gun dictates its own min and max loads - neither of which will I ever hope to never find. I don't like being that close to the ragged edge of anything. YMMV.

Jeff
 
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Hi Swany, I just want to make sure that I understand what you are saying. So you trim your case below minimum and still seat the bullet in the crimp groove, so if I understand what you are saying, your loads by design are going to be well short of the lands? Sorry, I just want to make sure I understand.

This is a great thread that I find very interesting. I have not been reloading very long so this is all good info. I trim my cases to 2.028" per my lyman book and my hand loads length is different depending on the bullet,
125 sierra gn fn/hp = 2.415"OAL,
Oregon Trail 170 gn fn= 2.515"OAL

As a comparison here is some factory ammo
140 gn Hornady Flex Tip 2.579" OAL,
160 gn Hornady flex tip 2.536" OAL,
170 Gn Fusion fn= 2.500"OAL,
150 gn Federal fn = 2.500"OAL,
170 gn Rem Core Loc RN = 2.495" OAL.
My lyman books says 2.550" is max OAL It also has very different OAL's listed for most of the reloads in it.
So my question is why aren't they all the same OAL for best consistency and hence best accuracy? Dang it :hmmmm: Now I have all these questions.
Yes I trim below the minimum to make all my cases the same so I can set the crimp and forget it.

Many of the bullets you list all have a different ogive or shape to the bullets nose. Unfortunately most books are taken for what they print and all it is in the minimum is at best a suggestion. Same as the maximum. In some cases yes that is maximum because the bullet if too long will not function reliably and jam in the lifter. Your lyman lists 2.550 yet the flex tip is 2.579 go figure.

I use a Lee 30-30 trimmer and have to stone several thousandths off the tip to get a full cut to make all my cases the same. I don't like the fact that if you don't do that some cases will be shorter than others causing a different tension on the crimp or none at all. Consistency is what you build accuracy on in the physical parts of reloading.

Many use the Lee FCD, I will never do that as I don't like crushing my bullets.
 

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Swany is right on. One reason that you don't see much on seating depth on this forum is most of us have found that seating depth is a non issue in the search for accuracy in these lever guns. Seating to the cannalure ( anyone have the correct spelling?) is important in bolt guns, not in lever guns as far as I have been able to determine. But then, shooting bolt guns and shooting lever guns with cast bullets are as different as tennis and handball, anyway.
 

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"Crimp Groove" "Cannelure" spell check won't recognize it.
 

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I know this is an OLD thread, but if anyone is wondering what the thread size on the Hornady OAL gauge, it's metric. M8x.75.

As far as seating depth goes, isn't base-to-ogive the most important measurement since that's what contacts the lands? I'm just getting started on reloading but this is what I've heard and it makes sense (since it applies to all bullets).
 

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@marginwalker Each 30-30 Lever is it own animal. I have one that patterns the 160ftx bullets like a shot gun ( 8 inch groups at 50 yards). Others have had great success with it. I have tried seating depths, multiple loads, you name it. The 160 ftx bullets do not work in my gun. That same gun shoots 150gr Corelokt bullets in a 1 inch group at 100 yards. I spent quite a bit time measuring and setting the COL for 2 thou off the lands. I did not see much difference in accuracy. For that gun, it seems that bullet weight and velocity plays more of a role than anything else.
 

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I know this is an OLD thread, but if anyone is wondering what the thread size on the Hornady OAL gauge, it's metric. M8x.75.

As far as seating depth goes, isn't base-to-ogive the most important measurement since that's what contacts the lands? I'm just getting started on reloading but this is what I've heard and it makes sense (since it applies to all bullets).
I love these old threads.
Thanks for the thread size.
Your just getting much to esoteric for lever guns,
In a lever rifle the cartridge must cycle thru the magazine to be usefull.
One can single load long boatailed bullets but they it may take removing the bolt to unload if unfired. That gets hinky in a competition.
 

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I have a single shot break open .30-30. I shoot 125 grain Speer spitzers and the most accurate seating depth is .015" off the lands. This gives me a COAL of 2.64" which is over the recommended max of 2.55". In my 30AS, I seat the bullets to the cannelure.
 

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A single shot 30-30 will let you play around all you want with OAL.
It's not the rifle that limits the 30-30 it the case. It will never be a 308.
I am not bagging on the 30wcf, I can't even shoot a 308.
 

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Marlins are for the most part a moderate range hunting rifle. They are not a bench rifle to shoot 1/2 in groups or compete with. If you are getting 3 shot groups 2 in or under at 100 yds it certainly is a good hunting rifle with accuracy for the job. It is way more important the rifle function for 3 quick shots, if needed. A good bullet seated to correct length to function and crimped properly is more important. Just the thoughts of an old man with Marlinitis.
Have a great day.
Jim
 
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