Marlin Firearms Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys

Recently picked up a mint 2 year old Marlin 1894C. This is my first centerfire lever action rifle. It will mainly be used for gallery rifle competitions, which are generally shot at 25 and 50 yards.

I see that to adjust for elevation there is a sliding stepped ramp under the buckhorn rear sight, and I wondered if each step corresponded to a known range, or if each ramp increased the range by a set amount? I have looked in the manual but couldn't find an answer.

Appreciate any and all advise.

Cheers

Dan :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,018 Posts
Hey there Mr Bowcat -- The short and simple answer is - no. Bullet ballistics have much more effect on the elevation settings. With 25 and 50 yard targets you might not have to adjust the elevator at all. Or one notch may center your point of aim and point of impact. My advice would be to shoot it with whatever ammunition you anticipate using and record your sight settings/elevator notch to point of impact. That's fun all in itself. Good luck. Best regards. Wind
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for that wind. I wondered if the bullet type would effect it. I will shoot it a bit and figure it out.

Thanks again

Dan
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
750 Posts
Add this to Winds reply. Your load could effect your shot also. I find different factory bullets have decidedly different trajectories. More effect at longer distances, so you might be sliding that elevator a bit at 50yds. Just an observation from a guy who doesn't reload........yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Dan,
I don't know if the steps on the factory rear sight elevator are calibrated or not. Many peep sights are set so one click equals approximately 1 MOA (approx 1" at 100 yards). I agree with trial and error testing for factory rear sight.
Jim
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
750 Posts
You will also note that there is a small screw on the face of the semi buckhorn. Loosening that screw will allow you to finitely adjust up or down the insert OR reverse it altogether. One side has a v and the other has a u.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,536 Posts
AINT NO FISH said:
You will also note that there is a small screw on the face of the semi buckhorn. Loosening that screw will allow you to finitely adjust up or down the insert OR reverse it altogether. One side has a v and the other has a u.
And to add to what you said you can replace the card and make a poor mans peep sight like I did to my 22 using a scrap piece of brass from a 45 case... ;D


 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,536 Posts
AINT NO FISH said:
That Eaglesnest, he's a crafty fellow! What's that front sight on that .22 anyway?

Greg
It is one of these, fits a 3/8 dovetail, great quality and US made. The cross hairs are .01 thick, just enough to see but doesn't block out anything. Eventually I am probably going to spring for a tang sight but I gotta tell you this getup works quite well!

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks very much for the replies guys. I am going to shoot it as it is for now, but probably upgrade to a Skinner peep sight when funds allow.

Thanks again,

Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
eaglesnest said:
It is one of these, fits a 3/8 dovetail, great quality and US made. The cross hairs are .01 thick, just enough to see but doesn't block out anything. Eventually I am probably going to spring for a tang sight but I gotta tell you this getup works quite well!

Morning Eaglesnest,

Thanks for including the pics in this thread, I wondered if you remember the diameter of the rear peep?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,536 Posts
BlueMntCeltic said:
Morning Eaglesnest,

Thanks for including the pics in this thread, I wondered if you remember the diameter of the rear peep?
I want to say 7/64, but I left the gun at the our other place so can't check that. I made it so when lined up with the front there would be a slight ring of light around the outside of the hole. Seems to work good. At one time I had a Marbles Bullseye ordered but after coming up with this I canceled the order as a tang or receiver sight is what I will probably go with eventually. While I like this setup for target shooting, the big buckhorn does block a lot out. The Bullseye would likely be better in that regard but only has the ramp steps for elevation adjustment. For the time being this setup works great and there is plenty of other things to pay for now.. ::)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,037 Posts
take the stepped ramp off. Measure the height change between each step. Let's say, for example, it's 1/64" per step.

Measure the distance between the front and rear sight. Let's say, for example, that it's 18"

So, take 1/64 divided by 18" times 300 feet times 12" and it will tell you how many inches up or down each step will make at 100 yards.

So: 1/64 / 18 x 300 x 12 = 3.125" at 100 yards, or 3 MOA

And in other words: Step height / sight radius x 3600 = change in MOA

I MADE UP THESE NUMBERS SO YOU NEED TO MEASURE FOR YOURSELF, but it works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
522 Posts
Or if you are math challenged, buy some extra stepped ramps and take a file with you and cut the steps down as you zero in for each range you want to use. Similar to zeroing a traditional muzzlelaoder with a fixed rear blade sight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,410 Posts
Here you go straight from Marlins website
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
750 Posts
Again, it all depends on your load. 158 gr. and 142 gr. shoots completely different at 100yds. So pick a load and make notations. Use another load, make notations. 158 and 142 grs shoot one foot different at 100 yds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,410 Posts
Yup, you're right different loads shoot to different aim points. Yet having a basis to start with helps, and knowing what the equipment was designed to do adds to the knowledge base.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top