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Hello everyone:

After knowing lever action guns with my Marlin 1894 in 44 Magnum, and being so darn difficult to get Marlins here, I'm about to decide the purchase of a Browning BLR in 308 Win. There are two reasons for this. First I'm a lefty when shooting rifles but my bolt action 30-06 is right handed; which is a bit of a problem when you need to keep aiming and fast shooting. The lever action functions just perfectly in this regard. And second, in this country, 308 Win is way less expensive than 30-06 ammo. I thought to buy a marlin 336 in 30-30 for longer range deer hunting, but I don't think I'm going to find any.
So, I need informed opinions on the Browning BLR rifle.

Thank you very much for your help.

Cheers
 
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You won't find a better hunting rifle.

Mark.
 
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You can't go wrong with the browning, they are well made, reliable, accurate and strong. ie. A great rifle and caliber. 8)
 

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That's great, my Aussie friends, very reasuring.

Cheers from the "really down&under" Patagonia :D :D :D

K
 

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mine needed a professional to get the trigger to barely
acceptable standards, YMMV.
 

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A couple of things that I know about the BLR. One is that they are not that easy to clean and unless a person is mechanically adept it is recommended that the action not be torn down because of the difficulty of getting the timing correct when you reassemble. And one personal caveat to me is that I am not a fan of the finish that Browning puts on them. Its pretty if its a safe queen but quickly looks ugly after field use, unless your the type of person to constantly be aware of where the gun is when you are walking through the brush. Other than that I have heard good things about their strength and the actions are butter smooth. What keeps them away from me is their price where I live. Most seem to be in the 700-800 dollar range. I would be tempted if I ran across a deal, but only then. ;D
 
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I had a BLR and sold it in favor of a Marlin 308MXLR. First, I didn't like that I couldn't take it down for cleaning and maint. Second was the finish. It is a beautiful rifle, buy I would have hated it once it went into te bush and got roughed up.

Great concept with the mag loading and the quality was clearly there. As always, it came down to personal preference.
 

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I can't remember who, but a member here took a BLR in .358Win and refinished the wood on it to "normal" standards. It was a beauty...
 

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The BLR is a very fine rifle indeed...

Somebody said they didn't stand up well to "field use"...I have a 243 BLR thats pretty old (old enough that it has a steel receiver), I bought it from my friends Dad when his eyes got so bad he couldn't hunt anymore (macular degeneration or whatever you call it)

It looks as good as it did brand new...

I also have 2 others...a 308 and a 358, neither have been used very much (never hunted with much at all)...but they haven't exactly been babied either. They look fine...

Taking them apart....is not that big of a deal. The rack and pinion in the action has to be put back in right, but its not that hard to do...and doesn't need to be done more than once a year anyway.

BLR's are not known for stellar accuracy, but for what they are (hunting rifles)...they are more than capable.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks a lot for your comments.
If I had the option to buy a Marlin 308MXLR here, I'd go for it in a second. But there is no way I'm going to find the Hornady ammo here.
Regarding complexity of disassembly, I think it wouldn't be a factor since I've been learning basic gunsmithing and do most of the work in my guns; so far so good.
As for wood finish, I'm all right with a scratch here or there. But the truth of the matter is I've hunted with my very delicate Anschutz on really harsh terrain and it still does look like new.

Thanks again
 
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I don't know about delicate but I have found Anschutz to be extraordinarily fine, robust and extremely accurate rifles. (They do make olympic standard rifles, ya know.)
 

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moofy07 said:
I don't know about delicate but I have found Anschutz to be extraordinarily fine, robust and extremely accurate rifles. (They do make olympic standard rifles, ya know.)
Oh, you're totally right, they are the finest, robust and extremely accurate rifles. Mine is. Probably I didn't use the proper word (one of the problems not being English native ::)). What I meant was my rifle looks so nice and has so perfect finish, some people think I shouldn't take her into the woods. But I do, and don't take any special care. She is still in pristine condition after so many years. Probably I didn't understand what was the problem with the BLR wood finish and going to the brushes, either.

Cheers
 

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--Ridgerunner665

I did not say that the whole rifle doesn't stand up well to field use. What doesn't stand up well is that high glossy finish that I see on all of the new BLRs and most of the old ones I run across. Its just a personal preference. I just think that when they get all marred up and you have splotches of glossy finish in between where it has been scratched or gouged, it just kinda looks like hell. I saw one a week ago a Cabela's in their used rack and the bluing was nice but the stock and forearm where not that great. Glossy here, glossy there, between the scrapes and gouges. I just wouldn't want to buy a new rifle and feel that I have to refinish it. Just personal preference. One thing I really do love about the BLR though is their take-down model, that's super sweet! ;D
 

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One of my friends here in Utah has used his Belgium made 308 BLR since he bought it back in Hig School. He has used it and factory 150 Corlokts on everything, mule deer, antelope, bunch of elk and one wild & crazy cow Bison ( we call them buffalo,ha) His still looks nice, though "getting there" in the worn department. It's over 40yrs old, and still hunting! I don't know anyone who has one of the new BLR's, but I would think they would work for you too. Good luck Compadre!
 

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Dad bought this .308 Browning BLR about 30 years ago. It's an all-steel Belgian made rifle. He used it, I've used it, my oldest son uses it... The doggone thing has been 100% reliable and reasonably accurate. About the only things I don't like about it are:

1. Mushy trigger pull - but somehow not bad enough for any of the three of us to have fixed in 30 years with it...

2. This old Belgian rifle can't use the magazines for the newer Japanese Brownings - they won't fit - so we're stuck with handling the two old mags we have, very carefully.

That's it - good rifle!







Some folks, me included, don't particularly like the balance of the long-action BLR's - but the short action .308's handle well for me.

Regards, Guy
 

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Discussion Starter #16
M700 said:
Dad bought this .308 Browning BLR about 30 years ago. It's an all-steel Belgian made rifle. He used it, I've used it, my oldest son uses it... The doggone thing has been 100% reliable and reasonably accurate. About the only things I don't like about it are:

1. Mushy trigger pull - but somehow not bad enough for any of the three of us to have fixed in 30 years with it...

2. This old Belgian rifle can't use the magazines for the newer Japanese Brownings - they won't fit - so we're stuck with handling the two old mags we have, very carefully.

That's it - good rifle!

Some folks, me included, don't particularly like the balance of the long-action BLR's - but the short action .308's handle well for me.

Regards, Guy
Thanks a lot Guy, nice pictures and great comments. I'm pretty sure this is the rifle I should get. Couple of questions: yours is a BLR 81 Model, isn't it?, it also seems to have a tube magazine, is that correct?, if so, what the function of that tube would be?. I'd appreciate your comments.

Take care,
 

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My dad traded in a pre 64 winnie 100 auto loader (.308) thats been giving him a headache since grandpa bought for him as his first rifle, jammed every shot. Put down cash for a browning blr 30-06 beautiful gun, i own a browning bar in 30-06 auto, but would give it up in a heartbeat for the lever. any how the stock is a beauty, action silky smooth, and is a real tack driver. I dont think you would be dissapointed with the purchase of a browning.
 

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I have a BLR 81 in .358 win (steel receiver, flush magazine, made in japan) It's a very accurate, nice handling rifle. I've never had a failure of any kind with mine. They are only traditional in look's, though I like that mine has no safety, just pull the hammer back and shoot. I believe what would be the mag tube is just a way to mount the forearm. My forward sling mount is mounted to the forearm cap screw. I say if it's a good deal buy it. They are good shooter's, .308 ammo pretty easy to get. Good luck.
Karl
 

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"Couple of questions: yours is a BLR 81 Model, isn't it?, it also seems to have a tube magazine, is that correct?, if so, what the function of that tube would be?. I'd appreciate your comments."

It was just the BLR when Dad got it - there wasn't any "81" or long action, or aluminum receiver, or pistol grip stocks, or any of the later changes. The receiver is all steel, neat old gun. No tube magazine, it uses these magazines - but they don't interchange with later Japanese versions. I believe the '81 designation came in when the aluminum receiver was introduced.



Regards, Guy
 

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Discussion Starter #20
M700 said:
It was just the BLR when Dad got it - there wasn't any "81" or long action, or aluminum receiver, or pistol grip stocks, or any of the later changes. The receiver is all steel, neat old gun. No tube magazine, it uses these magazines - but they don't interchange with later Japanese versions. I believe the '81 designation came in when the aluminum receiver was introduced.

Regards, Guy
Thanks Guy, it is crystal clear now. Cheers
 
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