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Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinking of getting a stock for my XL7S. Other than visually, what is the difference between the two? Weight? Durability? etc
 

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You should all Boyds and ask them your questions directly. It is my understanding that a laminate is stronger and more impervious to the elements (less or no warping) compared to a regular walnut stock. Essentially a laminate is made from thin slices of wood impregnated with glue and pressed together to create a pice of wood that is then shaped into a stock. Because of the resins used to glue the layers together, there is virtually no danger to the stock warping due to rain or humidity or lack thereof. I think the laminate is heavier for the same reason that make it stronger and more durable but Boyds is really good at removing excess weight by trimming and faceting the stock.

I've had a Boyds laminate on my FTR match rilfe for several years now and I love it. I have ordered another Boyds laminate for my Marlin XS-7 and it should be here this coming week. I love walnut for the subdued classic look it gives a firearm; I love laminate for the stability of the wood, and the durability, the look grows on you after a while and they are always different stock to stock.
 

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I love the look of the laminate and have one on my xs7 7mm-08. One thing that is noticible is the length between your hold hand and the trigger. Im a big guy and the length is def longer then the factory stock.
 

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I recently bought a Boyds Prairie Hunter in Pepper, green/black, laminate for my XS-7 in 22-250. It is a little heavy, like most (all?) of Boyds laminated stocks, but it came well inletted and it balances well, so it doesn't "feel" as heavy as it scales. I may buy a couple more for my 257 Roberts and 260 XS-7s and my 7x57 XL-7.

Jeff
 

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Can't speak for Boyds.
But for me I like the feel of wet cold wood against my face more than plastic maby with exception of dura-touch.
Wood may warp,the photo finish will rub off on plastic but you can repaint!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Let's say you've got a hunt in the mountains and will be hiking 5 miles in. Do you put a Boyds on your gun or stay with plastic?
 

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If I am walking in 5 miles which I do when I draw an eastern Oregon deer tag. I am taking my lighter gun. The boyds is heavier, but looks sweet. Nothing wrong with the tupper ware stock
 

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No way I’m hiking in 5 miles, in the mountains or anywhere else, to go hunting unless my life depends on it. Especially if I have to hike out 5 miles too. These old legs can't take it anymore. :) But to answer your hypothetical question, I would go with the lighter plastic for that hunt.

BTW, just bought an unfinished Boyds factory 2nd Prairie Hunter in Walnut that I'm in the process of finishing. I was hesitant about buying it but turns out the defects are so slight they wont be noticed unless I point them out. The good thing about having 2 stocks is you can switch if you know you're going to be hunting in rough terrain. A few shots to zero the scope before the hunt and you're good to go.
 

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Pegasus said:
You should all Boyds and ask them your questions directly. It is my understanding that a laminate is stronger and more impervious to the elements (less or no warping) compared to a regular walnut stock. Essentially a laminate is made from thin slices of wood impregnated with glue and pressed together to create a pice of wood that is then shaped into a stock. Because of the resins used to glue the layers together, there is virtually no danger to the stock warping due to rain or humidity or lack thereof. I think the laminate is heavier for the same reason that make it stronger and more durable but Boyds is really good at removing excess weight by trimming and faceting the stock.

I've had a Boyds laminate on my FTR match rilfe for several years now and I love it. I have ordered another Boyds laminate for my Marlin XS-7 and it should be here this coming week. I love walnut for the subdued classic look it gives a firearm; I love laminate for the stability of the wood, and the durability, the look grows on you after a while and they are always different stock to stock.
This is a really good summary, Im a wood machinist by trade and agree laminated stocks ( done well ) are far better than any single piece stock blank can be. If you want a walnut stock its not all bad news , they have been used for hungreds of years and can work very well. The big thing with a Walnut stock is that the inletting and barrell chanell should be generous . The stock must be completely sealed against moisture
inside and out , with either oil or estapol per directions. The rifle must be floated and bedded in my opinion for flex to have as little chance of developing as possible. Dont leave your rifle out in the hot sun , drizzle or wind and dont sit it next to a fireplace or campfire. Keep it well
lubricated , I like a wipe over with silicone when at camp so you dont get oil over every thing.Follow this pretty much and you should have few issues with losing zero, allthough it pays to put some shots on paper periodically.
 
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