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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been thinkin about reloading as my wallet gets slimmer, and all the books i can find are more load data than a for dummies book. i was wondering if anyone knew of a reloading for dummies book that covers all the required and recommended tools and practices. i was thinkin about a lee loader hand press, but i would like to know all i need to know before i start.
thank you (and forgive the spelling and grammar its late im tired)
 

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the book you want is "the ABCs of reloading", edited by bill chevalier.

also, the Lyman reloading manual has a pretty good introductory section, and it also seems to be the only one that gives data for multiple brands of bullets in the same book. The others all seem to give data only for their bullets.
 

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The Nosler manual that I bought some years ago has a decent intro to handloading rifle and pistol cartridges. It was all I had when I started in the '90's and got me headed in the right direction. The Speer manual that I later picked up is also good. I think that it is prolly a lot easier to get started nowadays, with the info and equipment reviews/recommendations available online.
 

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I can't say enough good about the Lyman manuals. I'm still using the 47th edition. Once the next one (50th) comes out I'll be upgrading.
 

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Every handloading manual I've ever seen has the basics of reloading explained in the front of the book, I learned how to reload with the Speer manual about 25 years ago. Understand, there are many facets of successful reloading, some may pertain to you and some may not (i.e. reloading straight-walled pistol rounds vs bottleneck cartridges) so it may seem overly complex.

The ABC's of Reloading would probably cover the same material as the manuals, and then some.
 

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not to step on any toe's...but I personaly think that every new (to reloading) person should start with a "LEE" manual, he explains (in detail) every aspect of hand loading. A-bit long winded...yes but it's all covered, and there's a good selection of proven loads. You should at least have it in your collection, and yes, you will end up with a collection!
 

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44-40 Willy said:
I can't say enough good about the Lyman manuals. I'm still using the 47th edition. Once the next one (50th) comes out I'll be upgrading.
+1 on Lyman.
 

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The only problem I have with name brand books, is that they tell you to use only there products.
An open forum like this, is stocked full of information, and time tested opinions.

Sporting stores like Cabella's and others have reloading clinics. You can also check or post on your local gun club bulletin board for a local reloader that can help you.
 

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woodrat said:
the book you want is "the ABCs of reloading", edited by bill chevalier.
Great Book! I keep going back to it for reference! Very generic and mentions multiple manufactures.
 

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I have Lee's 2nd edition and Lyman's 49th both go into detail on reloading quite well, both will get you started properly and safely, just read them carefully and pay attention. Fact is paying attention is the single most important aspect of reloading.
 

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First one I read was Lyman's 49th edition, then the Lee manual. After that I read Speer, Hornady, and Sierra in that order. Really Lyman and Lee cover just about everthing even though at times they read like an advertisement for their own products (especially Lee). Hornady has a excellent explanation of headspace and freebore with good pictures, Speer has some interesting stuff on the history of components and equipment and a great section on black powder loading, and Sierra has a good section on reloading for gas-operated rifles. They all cover a lot of the same stuff as far as the basics, but each one has some interesting chapters on various other stuff, and each is worth having for the load data.

If I was to have just one (to start with), I'd go with Lyman. It has excellent step-by-step guides and some interesting articles. Second on the list would be Lee because of the tremendous amount of load data it contains - they obtained load data from most of the companies who actually produce the data and compiled it into load tables that list just about every reasonable combination for most cartridges.
 

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I know its hard to find someone who has been loading for a while but watching and talking to someone who has experience makes the knowledge in the books kinda come together. I was lucky enough to start loading under supervision of a friend that had been loading for a while and then when reading the book everything kinda came together. I wish you luck.

I once was showing a friend how to reload and he was all ears and when it came time to put the primer in the casing he put it in upside down. I told him not to feel bad because it sometimes happened and he got so upset that he didn't want anything to do with reloading ever again. I never could get him to try it again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all the replies, i am going to have to continue my search in a store for one of the books listed as i usually despise ordering off the internet. one of my friends dad reloads for his 45 acp only, so i wanted to get as much information as possible on my own because we are both busy people, and then get him to supervise my safety and help the process become smoother.
Once again thank you for sharing yalls experiences with the reference manuals and pointing me in the right direction.
 

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Yeah, lots of good options, here. I'm thinking since your budget sounds a little tight you may want to gravitate towards the Lee stuff, at least for the time being, which would lead me to think you might want to start by looking at the Lee manual. Their products tend to be fairly ingenious and affordable, and make accurate ammo. Their presses tend to be great bargains, and work well. Do you have a bench or solid table top that you could drill holes in to mount one to? If so Lee probably makes a bench mounted press that you can afford, and you'll probably be better served here than the hand held press unless you don't intend to do a lot of reloading.

That said, a hand held press wouldn't be a bad place to start by any means. Neither would one of those Lee Classic Loader kits. They're so cheap! Just read through one of the manuals (particularly the Lee if you're thinking about the hand held presses or the Lee Classic Loader kits) before you start deciding here.

My suggestion, read through that manual first before you buy anything. Then start as simple (the more unsure you are, the more simple you should start) and come here whenever you have questions. Don't buy anything that isn't necessary to get the job done properly to start with. Then from there you'll probably have a better idea of what might work for your needs. I'm thinking start off with some kind of press, a set of dies, a way to manually measure powder (either a scale or a set of Lee dippers and a business card), a way to prime cases, some case lube if you're going to be reloading for rifles, some components, an inertia bullet puller to correct your mistakes, a pen and paper to keep track of what you're doing, some stickers to label your loaded ammo (bullet used, powder type and weight used, primer used, etc.), a flashlight to inspect your powder charges, and that's about it.

About reloading for dummies...sounds like you have a good plan putting safety as a high priority. It, via consistency and careful attention, and asking yourself (and others) questions about what you don't understand, should be top priority. You don't have to be a rocket scientist to be a great reloader, but you do have to be careful and treat the whole process with adequate respect. Putting a little thought and periodic reconsideration into intelligently organizing your workspace and workflow is not a bad thing, neither is adding redundant checks of what you're doing. Otherwise you may not be saving too much money if you're blowing up expensive firearms and paying expensive hospital or funeral expenses.

If you're determined to be safe and cautious, though, I encourage you to jump on in. It's a whole lot of fun, a relaxing hobby in its own right that is unique in that it gives you something "shooting related" to do without actually having to even leave your house! And it makes it a whole lot easier to afford to be able to shoot as much as you'd like.
 

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I have a lot of reloading books, some new and some old but I always refer to one of my older Lyman books and it is the 45TH eddition. Look in yard sales and book sales for old reloading books.
 
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