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When I bought the 68 Glenny I knew it had the birch wood on it. The fore arm and stock don't match and I decided I could stain the stock to match. Well birch won't take stain very well and I'm not sure I'll get this done. When I get close and try to sand it down smooth the stain starts coming off. May have to just make this a walnut Glenny
. Air gun Wood Shotgun
 

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I've never tried to stain Birch so I looked it up...

From the Minwax website...

Birch. Less expensive than hard maple, birch is often substituted for maple in furniture and kitchen cabinets. But, like hard maple, birch wood does not absorb stain evenly and should not be stained with dark colored stains. When staining, first apply a pre-stain wood conditioner, then select stains lighter in color.
 

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I know a cabinet builder.He stains birch cabinets all the time.He says it’s a pain.200 grit finish.Spray waterborne stain,blot overlapping . Do not wipe on,as it tends to fuzz up.They finish with water base satin.
I work behind these guys installing backsplash all the time.Their stuff looks great.I never refinished a birch stock.Did many walnut stocks.But,I’m thinking the process the cabinet builder uses would work on a gun stock too.
 

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Birch has a lot of open large pore grain in it that soaks up dark stain pigment resulting in muddy dark areas or blotchy "tiger stripes" of dark stain that contrast with the plain lighter areas.

You really need to use a pre-stain conditioner or sealer and lightly sand before applying the stain.

Lighter color gel stains are easier and more forgiving.
 

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All kinds. Enamored of their mechanisms! Worked as an engineering
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In the early 80's I designed and produced birch stocks inspired by the UZI and MG34 style for Mac-10's. I sold hundreds of them. I used a WATCO Danish oil stain, two coats. Birch is a crap shoot regarding grain and appearance. I've seen beautifully grained M14 stocks that rivaled nicely figured walnut. Most are rather mundane with some that are just plain butt-ugly.

AC
 

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I put gray laminate on mine.
MGW sells marlin parts and furniture.
Yes, it is new remington made stuff, but don't think the worst...
I've ordered some from them and it didn't even need to be inletted.
 

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I put stain on thick and even, give it about 1/2 hr and wipe off with mineral spirits. Usually have to repeat this several times to get a
decent color. I've tried with stain thinned way down and that don't work. I've also used min wax finish with stain and didn't like it
either. I've got some ebony stain that I use on single barrels that will stain in one application. It comes out greenish black but is
kind of pleasing, good enough for a single.
 

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Well, here's an option. First, I never stain raw wood since it allows me to have very little control over what is fixin to happen. I use Laurel Mountain stains, they are alcohol based. That allows me to apply the stain when I have the stock very nearly finished (on top of the finish). If you don't like what you've got, just wipe it off with alcohol and go again. When you've got the color you like, apply your final coats of finish and you are done. Makes a nice even color without the blotchy spots.
Phil
 

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I have used Birchwood Casey water based walnut stain with good results on birch or alder wood. It penetrates deep. Sand it smooth with 320 grit before you stain it.Then go over with several coats of sealer \grain filler. Then I just finish it with Tru-Oil.
 
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Before and mid-project pictures of my newly acquired Mossberg 500E .410 wood. I'm guessing it's birch but I'm no expert. The marks on the butt stock could have been hidden without a refinish but the foregrip finish was hazed (cloudy) badly so I started over. I must say the Mossberg finish was MUCH more difficult to remove than Ruger or Marlin finish. Gel paint stripper barely affected it. You wood pros would have a cow if I wrote what I did to get the last of the finish off, especially in the checkering.

Metal Wood Copper Caramel color
Product Wood Hardwood Metal Steel
Wood
Silver Beige Metal
 

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As predicted and as I have experienced a time or two...the stain didn't take to this mystery Mossberg very well. I already ordered some much nicer alcohol based product in dark brown. The reviews are good so I am confident. Tru-Oil is only there to hide an ugly spot. I might use it last after the color looks proper.
Tree Wood Design Material property Wood stain
 

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I have had very good results staining white wood with Birchwood Casey Walnut water based stain. You must be sure to strip off and wash any finish that is on the wood. I strip and then wash the wood in either Acetone or Laquer Thinner. Then stain to darkness with the water based stain. When you finish the wood the water based stain will not melt off like the oil based furniture stain.
 

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My special dye arrived Wednesday. Maybe today I will have time to put a coat of it on and see how it does.
 
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My special dye arrived Wednesday. Maybe today I will have time to put a coat of it on and see how it does.
Two back to back applications of the Fiebing Leather Dye then one very light coat of Tru-Oil so far. I like the antique look of the color. I will put a few more light then one heavier coat of Tru-Oil on then let it cure a few days before knocking the sheen off. This no longer looks like a late '90's Mossberg.

Footwear Brown Handgun holster Leather Boot
 

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That looks great GG!:beer:
 
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Two back to back applications of the Fiebing Leather Dye then one very light coat of Tru-Oil so far. I like the antique look of the color. I will put a few more light then one heavier coat of Tru-Oil on then let it cure a few days before knocking the sheen off. This no longer looks like a late '90's Mossberg.

View attachment 754441
that is nice, what color die did you use,,,,,,,
 
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