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Picking up a .308 Ruger American soon, does anyone have an opinion on a good scope to put on it?

For suggestions please keep in mind I'm a budget-minded college student so I'm not looking at Trijicons, I want to keep it somewhere close to or below $200.

I was looking into Nikon Buckmaster and ProStaff 3-9x40 BDC. Is the ProStaff worth the extra money, or is the Buckmaster comparable enough that a relatively newbie wouldn't really notice?
 

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I always bought monarchs in the past and I am not up to speed with their offerings anymore but to my recollection the Buckmaster was marketed as a better scope than the ProStaff. The ProStaff was their introductory scope.
 

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I put a $50 Barska on my daughter's Ruger American 243. It will put three in a jagged hole at 100yds.

Barska might not be thought highly of, but I own four of them...anything from a 22lr to my 375 Ruger, not one issue.
Picking up a .308 Ruger American soon, does anyone have an opinion on a good scope to put on it?

For suggestions please keep in mind I'm a budget-minded college student so I'm not looking at Trijicons, I want to keep it somewhere close to or below $200.

I was looking into Nikon Buckmaster and ProStaff 3-9x40 BDC. Is the ProStaff worth the extra money, or is the Buckmaster comparable enough that a relatively newbie wouldn't really notice?
Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

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What exactly do you mean by repeatable true adjustments?
Scopes at that price point sometimes adjust too much or too little with a given adjustment. You think your moving 1” but it might only move 1/2” or maybe even 1-1/2” also sometimes you make an adjustment and the poi does not change make an adjustment again no change. Then all of a sudden the changes you made take hold and the poi jumps on you. The recoil of the gun set the adjustment. Most of the scopes in this price point once zeroed will hold a zero just fine but making adjustments cranking in the turrets can be frustrating. The glass on these scope although top of the line are perfectly fine for deer hunting and they hold a zero just fine. Just don’t expect to be able to crank the turrets to adjust for windage.
 

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I have several of those vortex diamondbacks on rifles, they serve the purpose well for me.
 

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The Leupold VX-1 3-9X40mm will definitely work but so will the Redfield Revolution 3-9X40mm (made by Leupold). The Redfield is the matte version of the VX-1 and was cheaper the last time I bought one. Quality between the two is about the same---both will not let you down and have that famous Leupold guarantee. I haven't priced either scope in awhile and don't know what they are going for now. The VX-1 has been discontinued and you might get a deal on a close out listing.
 

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Depending what you want to do.If you want to reach out 500 plus yards,get a Vortex Viper 6.5-20x50.It will run you $400,But it will track a lot better than a Rifleman or a Nikon buckmaster.
If you just want to shoot and hunt out to 200 a Nikon Buckmaster will suit you fine.Only runs $150
Both Nikon And Vortex offer lifetime warranty.
 
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I have purchased a couple of Swift scopes and had very good luck with them as long as you get the Top of the line models. They are at a good price point also. You can check them out at Optics Planet. If you find a dealer and you purchase on there is a no questions asked guarantee. Bring in the bad one walk out with a new one. I never needed to do that but its nice to know.
 
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The Leupold VX-1 3-9X40mm will definitely work but so will the Redfield Revolution 3-9X40mm (made by Leupold). The Redfield is the matte version of the VX-1 and was cheaper the last time I bought one. Quality between the two is about the same---both will not let you down and have that famous Leupold guarantee. I haven't priced either scope in awhile and don't know what they are going for now. The VX-1 has been discontinued and you might get a deal on a close out listing.
I can attest to Ret_Eng advice. I have 3 of the Redfield Revolutions and great scope for the price.
 

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There are hunting scopes, and then there's target scopes...and then
there are hunting scopes that have some of the features of a target scope.
If I was going to hunt with the rifle, I wouldn't want all the busy features
of a target scope, like a side parrilax adjustment.
I also would not want hold-over bars, unless I intended to hunt long distances.
The most popular hunting scopes are a plain 3X9X40...and
that's why everybody makes one.
I personally don't like a 50mm objective because they need to sit too high.
I have a target rifle that I hunt long distance with.
In winter I take the straight 16X paper-puncher glass off and swap a
4-16 scope that is, like I mentioned, a cross between a target scope
and a hunting scope. It has a side parralax knob and hold-over bars...
But I use it for 4-500 yard shooting and at that distance, I have time
to adjust it before taking a shot.
I have a 308 I hunt with, and it wears a 2-7X32.
But I don't intend to shoot past 300 yards with it...More likely 200.
It all depends on what you want, what distances you intend to shoot,
and what your personal preferences are.
Advice on glass is hard for me to give....That is why i don't talk brands.
I will only tell you what I have, and most are Leupold, but I also have
a few Nikon, a SWFA, and some early Weavers.
Glass has come a long way. There is a lot of affordable quality
stuff out there now days.
The main thing is don't buy more than you need and whatever
you get, get used to it and shoot it a lot before hunting with it.
 

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Country boy advice. The Nikon pro-staff is a good scope. I have two. The Leopold Rifleman is good too, as well as even the cheaper Bushnell Banner. For casual shooting and normal hunting, don't worry about using the turret for windage. Just sight the gun in slowly. Remember that some barrels have a different POI cold barrel vs warm. The same can be true of a clean bore vs a fouled bore that has been shot a couple of times. Figure out the combination needed to put your first bullet where you want it for hunting. Then practice at 100, 200, and maybe even 300 yards to learn the POI and just hold the cross-hair accordingly.
I shoot a gun before hunting with it and do not clean the bore all season unless it gets really wet or something.
As a College kid you do not have a budget for long range precision shooting. That can come later.
 
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