Marlin Firearms Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
From what I've seen over the years here in WI., the most common open sight installed on the 336 and similar rifles is the old Williams "peep" on the receiver, and no insert in the aperture. This setup wasn't much for putting a cloverleaf group on paper, but did a great job of getting the shooter on target when the 12 pointer ran out of the drive. Now it seems that if you don't have some kind of scope, you just aint in the game. I've experimented with, made, and used pretty much every open sight design. I like shooting with open sights, and sometimes feel that scoping a classic lever action .30-30 is like putting a two dollar saddle on a thoroughbred. Wondering what your thoughts are and the type of OPEN SIGHT you find best for whitetail or similar game.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,037 Posts
Instead of the "ghost ring" setup of taking the rear aperture out, you could try a 0.125" aperture or even the "standard" 0.093". Take the aperture out only when the light won't let you see through the peep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,141 Posts
I think this is a two topic Question:

One how good are your rifleman skills?
Second, How are the eyes?

I still shoot with open sights..If I can see it, it's DRT.

BUT there are times where my eyes, from either just not enough vitamins in my diet that day or they become fatigued from the binoculars that a scope would be appropriate.

Some people use a scope and still can't hit their target...Perhaps zeroing in beyond the rifles or shooters ability.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,170 Posts
I have scopes on two of my lever actions, a Leupold VXII 1-4x20 (on my 336C .35 Remington) and a Burris FFII 2-7x35 (on my .444 XLR-Modified). The Winchesters are all equipped with the factory sights, while my 1894 wears a Skinner and my 1895CB wears a Williams FP.

I am partial to the Skinner for the rugged simplicity, and once those sights are set where you want them, the robust design keeps them there. Not to mention that the sculpted contours of the Skinner just seem to fit and flow with the lines of the Marlin receivers.

I like the Williams FP because it is just so darned easy to make fine adjustments. However, I don't think the design or the materials used are any where nearly as robust as the Skinner.

As for hunting with open sights, my 1894 with the Skinner is my general "go-to" rifle and I feel confident with it on deer sized game out to 150 yards. I generally keep the 0.096" aperture in it, and for average light conditions it is adequate. In early morning or late evening, as lighting is dim or waning, I will screw the aperture out and make do with the "ghost ring", knowing that my effective range is now cut back to 100 yards or less. I will occasionally hunt with the Winchester factory sights, and do okay with them, but knowing the limitations of those sights compared to the receiver mounted peeps is paramount. The great thing about hunting with scopes is the ability to make the last split-second observations in great detail (compared to iron sights) prior to firing the shot. With a scope, twigs are a non-issue in making the shot.

As far as the "light gathering" of scopes with an exit pupil of 5mm (or less) - they offer NO advantage over peeps other than enhanced magnification.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
223 Posts
I still like the "peep" sights, even though my eyes are getting a little old. I can use them a lot better than leaf type rear sights, and a scope just makes my lever guns too cumbersome. I have larger apertures, don't remember the exact size, in all my sights. I prefer the Williams, but do have a few Lymans. I have one of the WGRS sights on a 30-30, and it's good for a gunboot/scabard gun, but I still prefer the micrometer type for most uses. I haven't tried removing the aperture and using the "ghost ring" approach, but it sounds like it has possibilities. I don't normally "see" the aperture anyway. Don't know if this helps, if not just chalk it up as the ramblings of an old coot. ;D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies, especially why a particular sight works for you. But, what about anything new you have tried? For example, I did find that a triangular front sight with rather steep sides about twice the length of the base seems to work quite well with a large aperture.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,170 Posts
PAS said:
... a triangular front sight with rather steep sides about twice the length of the base seems to work quite well with a large aperture.
I have an 8x57 Mauser, originally it had the V-Notch rear sight and inverted V front post. With my best load, that sight configuration allowed me to shoot ~4 MOA at best. I found a Williams (5D type) and mounted it on the rear receiver ring. Using that peep and a0.093" aperture, that same load would shoot ~1-1/2 to 2 MOA. Since then, I found a scope base that is machined to fit the rear sight mount, and mounted a 2-7x32 LER scope in a scout configuration. Now, with the same loads, that rifle will shoot 3/4 MOA out to at least 250 yards. All the sighting and testing was done with the same load from the same lot of reloads.

I, personally, don't really care too much for the inverted V front post, but rather prefer a simple flat topped front post. I reckon some people will do just as well with either one, provided the rear sight is appropriate. There are quite a few others on MO that shoot way more European Mil-Surps than I do, and they probably can shed quite a bit of light as to their opinion of the V-Notch and inverted V sights.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
I'm a fan of Skinner sights for their robust design. I also like a Merit #4 adjustable aperture but you need to order an extra tall stem for it to work on Skinner sights. I've also had several with the XS ghost ring and it is great for quick, close shots but a bit too big for precision plinking and paper shooting.

The biggest advantage to the adjustable iris is that it can go from HUGE to TINY with a quick turn. I like tiny for plinking and paper in broad daylight, somewhere in the middle for stationary hunting, and wide open for stalking and up close shooting. For what it's worth right about in the middle is about as large as a standard aperture opening.

Here's the limits of the #4 iris on an airgun of mine but it fits firearms peeps too. I have an iris for all of my peep sights now. After I got this one on my airgun, I quickly decided it was a must have for all my peep sights...

Wide open for almost as large as a ghost ring...



TINY for super precise shots, this makes the targets a little dark but makes groups nice and small...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
PAS said:
Thanks all for great posts.
Seems the aperture rear sight is alive and well!
Apertures are the quickest, easiest, and most accurate open sights made. They cost less than a quality scope and exceed the accuracy limitations of a whole lot of hunting guns. Honestly, I don't understand why more manufacturers don't sell guns from the factory with aperture sights.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
23,800 Posts
I pull the insert ala ghost ring, if I'm walking in, around or out. Put it back in while on stand.

I do drill my hunting inserts out as large as the relief hole in the thread bbl.

I also shoot a peep with both eyes open. I makes moving shots better, with the insert removed much more so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
I have no experience with the peep sights on a Marlin...however I love them on my Garand!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,335 Posts
gdpolk,

THANK YOU for posting that info and the pic's of that peep. Never seen anything like it but it's exactly what I've always dreamed of finding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
I'll throw out another idea that I put on one of my Marlins. Useing the factory rear sight squez the spring portions together and remove the blade from the rest of the rear sight. Then fix the blade to something to hold it steady and firm ( smooth jaw small vise, or padded vice-grips . Then useing a small file cut the top of mthe blade down into a shallow "V" shape. You may or maynot want to keep a small notch in the center , but this might slow wyou down when sighting. Put the sight and spring base back together and mount. Sight in as you normally would but you now have a shallow "V" blade rear sight.
To my eye this is much faster than our regular Buckhorn rear sight. Sights similar to this have been prefered for generations in Africa hunting dangerous game, where your life depends on quickly getting your shot off at a charging irate large beast.
It's not that hard to do and gives excellent resuwlts. You won't use this to win any 200yd open sight only matchs, butit does look cool and works very well-quick.
Guzziac,
Richard P.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
Dave Bulla said:
gdpolk,

THANK YOU for posting that info and the pic's of that peep. Never seen anything like it but it's exactly what I've always dreamed of finding.
No problem. Get the #4 hunting iris. They run about $50 but allow you to have all sorts of settings without having to keep up with multiple apertures and without having to screw in and unscrew them when conditions change. To go from wide open to tiny only takes a 45* turn.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,380 Posts
Couple weeks ago, I put down a big hog with a 220 yards shot, using my 1894 44 Mag and Skinner peep sight (.096" aperture) and factory front sight. Don´t know if this is the best peep, but it works just fine for me.

Cheers
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,309 Posts
I opted for a Williams WGRS rear peep and Firesight front for my 336. The Firesight works well in lowlight conditions with the apeture pulled out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
LT,
Have used the same system with the firesight front. I think this is one of the best combinations with the larger aperture rear sight.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,593 Posts
PAS,

I use XS ghost rings for hunting and GP shooting. I use them because they are set once and forget about them
until the gun falls apart. They are faster than heck, They are rugged. I've found the large peep to be no less accurate than the small peep. When shooting factory irons for quick shots most shooters shoot high. I will say the accuracy potential really comes from
the width of the front sight. The Skinner setup with a thinner front sight blade is fairly tuff and works pretty darn good too.
With practice and not focusing on the rear ring, you'll be in like Snooki.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top