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Biggest cause of leading in a revolver, any revolver, is too hard of a bullet, regardless of the size. Run a softer alloy of 13bhn or softer, 16:1 or 20:1 will be perfect and size them to the EXACT size of your forcing cone. The bullets need a chance to obturate. If they can't obturate, or they're too hard to obturate, they'll shave as they enter the forcing cone and gas cut something serious. If you can't get your calipers into your forcing cone for a good measurement you'll need to make a careful slug casting, or a cerrosafe cast.

Trust me on this one. Spents weeks when I was a newer caster chasing my tail with a GP100 and a magnum load trying to figure out leading. I was still sucked into the "ALL YOUR BULLETS NEED TO BE AS HARD AS TITANIUM" vortex. Elmer Keith liked 16:1 for his magnums for a reason.
 

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"If it says "Chore Boy" with a picture of the little chore boy wearing a read hat, then it is made of pure copper."
--Gohon

Maybe yes, maybe no. In my searches for Chore Boy I came across two or three that had a similar logo/name, but were copper plated steel. Cannot recall who made them, but I do believe that they were another "quality import"....
 

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Guys, even the copper plated steel knock offs will work fine. That steel is much softer than your barrel steel, and hopefully after you go thru the pain of scrubbing silver galena out of your barrel, you have learned your lesson and won't let it happen again and it doesn't matter anymore at that point.
 

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Biggest cause of leading in a revolver, any revolver, is too hard of a bullet, regardless of the size. Run a softer alloy of 13bhn or softer, 16:1 or 20:1 will be perfect and size them to the EXACT size of your forcing cone. The bullets need a chance to obturate. If they can't obturate, or they're too hard to obturate, they'll shave as they enter the forcing cone and gas cut something serious. If you can't get your calipers into your forcing cone for a good measurement you'll need to make a careful slug casting, or a cerrosafe cast.
Can't agree or disagree with your statement as 99% of what I shoot is Wheel Weight alloy with a little tin added for fill out. That would be just 11-13 BHN though I have water dropped 22 caliber cast that jumped up to 18 BHN for shooting in the 223. So I've never had any experience with really hard alloy but I've read many reports that state hard cast has leaded more barrels than soft cast.

Having said that I also know that if properly sized over groove there is no need for the bullet to bump/obturate.

There is another solution for the OP but doubt he would go there but that is to powder coat the bullets. Not the Hi-Tek stuff but real powder coating. I've even bought Hornady cast lead which is pretty soft, rinsed them 2 or 3 times in gasoline to remove the lube and powder coated them and they shot just fine. Thing about powder coating is they can be hard, soft, or undersized and the powder coating will protect them the same as jacketed with no leading.
Anyway, that's been my experience...Something to think about.
 

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Can't agree or disagree with your statement as 99% of what I shoot is Wheel Weight alloy with a little tin added for fill out. That would be just 11-13 BHN though I have water dropped 22 caliber cast that jumped up to 18 BHN for shooting in the 223. So I've never had any experience with really hard alloy but I've read many reports that state hard cast has leaded more barrels than soft cast.

Having said that I also know that if properly sized over groove there is no need for the bullet to bump/obturate.

There is another solution for the OP but doubt he would go there but that is to powder coat the bullets. Not the Hi-Tek stuff but real powder coating. I've even bought Hornady cast lead which is pretty soft, rinsed them 2 or 3 times in gasoline to remove the lube and powder coated them and they shot just fine. Thing about powder coating is they can be hard, soft, or undersized and the powder coating will protect them the same as jacketed with no leading.
Anyway, that's been my experience...Something to think about.
Very true on the powdercoat. What once was thought of as a nice replacement for lube is quickly being found to be a polymer jacket. It's really changing things.
 

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Aren’t the factory lead bullets from Hornady & Speer swaged , not cast. The only experience I’ve ever had with leading was with Speer 45 cal lead bullets. They were SWCs and 240-250gr don’t remember. I had picked up a S&W 45 that I wanted to try out and had the Speers on hand. Loaded at target velocity 750-800fps. The leading looked like something out of a cartoon. Between 12 and 18 shots it looked like lead foil extending from muzzle. I have shot Hornady lead bullets in K38s, again at Target velocities with good results. I think cast is harder than any of the swaged. I pour dozens of caliber and style bullets, plain base and never had leading.
 

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Aren’t the factory lead bullets from Hornady & Speer swaged , not cast.
Yes...they are swaged instead of cast. I should have used the proper term swaged instead of cast for those bullets. The fact is being swaged they are softer than cast at BHN.8.0-8.5 for the Hornady. Don't know about the Speer bullets.
 

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Been casting for three years now. I have shot cast through three of my rifles and three of my pistols with zero leading. All bores were slugged before hand and my boolots were all sized a thousands over bore accept for my marlin 336 microgroove. It slugged at .357” and my bullets were sized at .3595”. All tumble coated with powder coat. I have tried alloys from 7.8 Bh to 16 BH with velocities over 2600 FPS. I have had choreboy on hand but haven’t had to brake it out once as I have had zero leading. Bullet to bore figment is key.
 

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The first and foremost thing to do, is determine is where the leading is occurring. Is it distributed along the majority of the barrel length, is it in the last part near the muzzle, or only just past the barrel threads? Next, if your cylinder chamber mouths are not uniform, that would be my starting point. I would have them all honed to the size of the largest one unless it is way too large. I would slug the barrel to find the true diameter. While slugging the barrel you may want to re-slug after measuring to see if there are tight spots anywhere along the barrel. Thread crush at the barrel/frame will produce leading just inside the barrel. Leading near the muzzle will indicate lube failure. Leading the full length would indicate a rough barrel, a bullet too small, or too soft. Tight spots will indicate a need to fire lap the barrel. Once you have addressed these problems, you want to size your cast bullets one to two thousandth larger than the barrel diameter and at least the size of the cylinder throat if it is larger. If the bullet is too soft for the velocity, a gas check may help. It is never one thing that causes leading so some detective work is in order. It get easier when you are aware what causes leading. Always begin with a squeaky clean barrel. Always clean it when switching between lead and jacketed bullets or vice versa.
When I first started, I didn't have a clue. I always got leading. The worst was Speer soft swaged lead bullet and beveled based cast bullets. Once I got a verity of sizing dies for my sizer, I could fit the bullets to the barrel. I cast my own from wheel weights and used a good lube. I was astounded at how they would shoot without leading once I matched the bullet to the barrel.
If your cylinder throats are smaller than the barrel, they will swage the bullet down too small and let gas cutting start at the bullet base. Thread crush will do the same thing. It not only leads the barrel, but destroy accuracy.
It would be rare for one gun to have all these conditions. It is usually only one or two. By being aware they exist, you can better diagnose your particular gun. I hope this helps.
 
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