Marlin Firearms Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,342 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have been fortunate to have run across only two less than pritine bores in my wandering marlinitus and would like to hear experiences if others with the same.
Two 1893s full length rifles are my challenge, one octagon barrel, the other round.
One is a project gun getting ready to come together.
The other is a 100% original family heirloom.
Both Have smooth and tight actions, VERY strong rifling, and to my eye substantial pitting the first 1/3 of the barrel length.
The balance of the barrel has only moderate pitting... That's moderate, not a light dusting.
My guess is that these were not cleaned after shooting with the older corrosive priming compounds.
My hope is to get these up as shooters.
I'm thinking that while I prefer cast bullets, these ragged barrels just might polish up a little do ok with jacketed bullets?
Your experienced thoughts are welcome.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,567 Posts
I don't know. One thing I totally stay away from are bores with any signs of pitting. Some rust on the outside can be fixed, I sure don't know about pitted bores. I guess they may shoot OK, or they may not shoot at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,342 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Given choices, I too stay away from pitted bore, but these just came my way, and if with a little effort and a lot of luck I can get 'em to hoot at 50 yards, I'd have bit better wall hanger!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,019 Posts
I would give Marshal Stanton a call at Beartooth bullets about fire-lapping those barrels.
http://www.beartoothbullets.com/

He talked me into doing a 1895 cowboy that had been pitted on the gulf coast. Now it shoots great and cleaning is a breeze. Before I fire-lapped it would take about an hour- 1 1/2 to clean the barrel, now it takes a pass of the brush and a couple patches to finish. Marshal may tell you stories of totally abused military rifles with grey bores that after lapping were sub MOA. From your description I bet you can fix both those up nicely.

there are a few pictures in this tread on how it is done:
http://www.marlinowners.com/forums/index.php?topic=86429.0


Good luck, and you cant just tell us about two 1893's without pictures!!!

james
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,448 Posts
Try them, they may work! Three short stories. Years ago #1 SIL dropped off his model 700 in .25-06 for me to install a new scope and for a good cleaning. Barrel was bulged 6-8" from the end. Called him and told him it needed a new barrel. He said it was that way when he got it and it shot a "good pattern." I went ahead with the scope project and took it to the range and shot a slightly under an inch three shot group. Next-Several years ago, I had a Browning BAR in .30-06 rebored to .338-06 by the guru of that black art at the time. He let the boring reamer chatter and I discovered his error AFTER HE SOLD THE SHOP and retired. The rifle grouped just over an inch with one land missing and another partially so for about four inches. Being the perfectionist type, I dumped that rifle. I sure wish I had it back! Lastly-my 1948 commercial Colt 1911-A1 has a rather badly pitted bore that was likely caused by corrosive primers. It just shoots too good to mess with. I have finally learned that perfection is not always required for good firearms performance. Good luck with yours. You can always have them relined if it comes to that. Jack
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
This sure is a timely post. I have inherited the Winchesters that have been in my father's family for next to forever. They have not been real well taken care of on the inside, and the outside shows a century of wear. These were guns used on the farm up in Maine. The actions all seem tight, they feed properly and don't show any sign of significant loose-ness, but the the bores are pitted some, about like what the original poster described. They are in 38-55, 32 special and 32WCF (32-20). I did have them inspected by a gunsmith years ago when I first got them and he felt they were safe to use. They were not bore scoped, only inspected with a light.

I have cleaned them a couple of times since they got handed to me but I have never fired any of these 3. I also have a 50's vintage M94 carbine in 32 special that I have hunted and spent time at the range with. I picked up some Laser-cast lead pills for the 32 special and hope to get some loaded up for the old timer in a month or so. Like the OP, I'll be monitoring the responses for advise of others with the less than stellar bores.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,342 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I am once again humbled by the response from our Marlin family here, and from your experiences I am somewhat optimistic.
I'll recall the BIL's 3rd family generation '93, and talk to Stanton about firelapping as well.
I'll probably do both rifles at once, and will keep you posted on progress.
Now I need to go finish the stock repair on the last '93.
Regarding photos, I'll post 'em when I can, and mind you, these were rancher's range guns,
working tools with LOTS of genuine time in the saddle scabbards in all sorts of weather...
Folks can talk cowboy guns, but these are the no kiddin' real deal.
Hope we can get 'em to shoot, even marginally well.
Thanks, and keep your experiences coming!!!
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top