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I am newbie to the MO forums but have learned a whole lot from a whole night of reading posts. I read this thread while on lunch break at work and thought oh no! With my luck mine will be cracked for sure. However i tore it down last night and it has no cracks, but there are some nasty looking grinder marks where the the receiver/barrel/ magazine tube all meet. I dressed it up and put some Brownells paste blue on it, then smeared a little bore butter over that and put it back together.

These are such wonderful rifles when done right that it's a shame for remington to taint their legacy as they have. I also have a late model H&R in 45-70 and it has some of the crudest workmanship I've ever seen incorporated into its assembly. Mostly fit and finish!

Someone may have covered this and i missed it, if so sorry for repeating. However when taking your forearm off it may feel real tight and seem to take a whole lot of force to get the tube off of the front stud, You may need to use a very sharp knife and relieve the wood on the forearm where it is binding on the forearm cover post(the thing that the forend end cover screws to). Mine was so tight that I would have split the forearm for sure had I not relieved it in this area before pulling the tube off the stud!
 

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I bought an 1895S in Feb, 2014 and when I bought it I knew it had bad wood because just a casual inspection at the dealers showed that the metal did not touch the wood anywhere. I bought it in spite of that because the gun otherwise looked great. I took it home and called Marlin and told the person I spoke with about the wood and I told him noone should ever pay that much for a new gun and have furniture that looked like that. He agreed and emailed me a shipping slip to send it back to them via UPS. I did and they kept it for about a month. I finally got it back and they put a very pretty wood on it and not only does it look good but it is a perfect fit. It is even better than I saw on a jm Marlin in many years if ever. It looks like they hand fit it. I am very please with their response and with the results.
 

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I just got done tearing down and cleaning my 1895G and found no problems with it. I wasn't expecting any though, the barrel has a JM stamped on it. Good information regardless as I am considering buying a set of dies for this round and I will know where to look for problems.
 

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G'day Greg, welcome aboard. Have a real good read of this thread, lots of good info. If you still have questions then, ask away.

Cheers,
Mark.
 

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Guys, wonderful thread with a lot of commendable work and sharing of information! I have a Remlin SBL and I would like to inspect my receiver. In the great article on takedown to inspect, it shows the standard tube disassembly instructions. How does the SBL or full-length tube differ in the takedown? I removed the side screws from the fore end cap and the one at the bottom of the reciever. I see there is another screw at the front end with a dove tail piece connecting the barrel and end of tube. I guess my question is how firm can I pull up on the end of the tube to clear the stud (in the dove tail of the barrel)? It seems the fore end and mag tube are pretty tight.
Any help appreciated.
 

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Thanks Eli Chaps! I guess I will rinse and repeat with a rubber mallet and some cloth wrap.
 
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Thanks Eli Chaps! I guess I will rinse and repeat with a rubber mallet and some cloth wrap.
gundogr no need to remove the screw at the bottom of the receiver to remove the magtube.

The two screws for the end cap and the one that screws into the dove tail at the end of the magtube, then lift up on the fore arm wood near the end cap while moving wiggling (if tight) the fore arm towards the end of the barrel. Once the wood comes out of the front of the receiver lift up on the tube near the dovetail at the end of barrel and everything will come out. Watch out....... the spring and magtube follower just shot across the room!:biggrin: Be careful.
 

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how many have read about this and actually checked? 50? 75?
Im new to marlin & levers. Is there any indication of age etc where failing is more likely ?

I ask as i have a 2002 1895 GS thats only fired 20 factory rounds through in total. I know you can not have too much safety however i was wondering if age is a trigger for checking ?

Thanks
 

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Since you asked, I’ll jump out on a limb here and express my personal opinion regarding the quality history of Marlin rifles. In my lifetime, I’ve handled and shot so many Marlins that I believe I could tell you what decade it was made in with my eyes closed, from the ‘40s forward. Anyway, I saw great improvements in rifles across the board during the ‘60s. Metallurgy changed, chrome began to be added to steel more often, glass bedding of barrels showed up in rifles of the quality of Sako, Weatherby and Mauser. Free floating barrels became popular about 10 years later. Anyway, barrels and receivers were now much stronger than they ever were before, and reloading manuals showed, to me at least, an increase in allowable pressures. This was short lived however, and I have a Speer manual from about 1972 that shows a 10% decrease across the board from the previous issue, just on legal advice. O.K. we have better quality receivers and barrels, and M1 Garands become popular to “sporterize”. Now we have all kinds of experimental barrel bedding going on, and competition in rifle making is at a frenzy because the economy is good and people are now buying something new and not just using the military surplus rifle they got for $9.00 (the price of my first gun). Well, the technology and metallurgy used by Mauser, Sako and others, started to show up in Marlin rifles in the late 60's and ‘70s. They were very competitive, with beautiful fit and finish, and much nicer wood than ever before. You could still find a dog or two if you really looked, especially in the contract rifles made for Western Auto, Montgomery Ward, Sears and others, but competition caused great improvements in this era for Marlin. These improvements began just before Marlin started building their rifles with a folding rear sight, which I personally despise, but that’s another post. In the ‘80s, the cross-bolt safety became a factor, and hardly anyone likes it, but while lawyers were having their effect on Marlin, quality did not seem to diminish, and the Marlin rifles of the 70’s and 80’s are my choice for the strongest and most beautiful to date. Their furniture is quite a bit better than Winchester in this era. I saw quality start to drop off in the ‘90s, about the same time that synthetic (plastic), and laminated (plywood) stocks became popular. I’m waiting for somebody to come out with a bonded (sawdust) stock. I’m sure there’s somebody out there who would think “it’s the bomb”. Now, if you look, you can still find a strong and beautiful Marlin rifle, but quality is all over the place, so you have to be very discriminating. My problem is that some quality problems have been discovered where you cannot see them in the shop, such as the weak receiver (cracks found) on some 45-70s. With that kind of quality control, I’ll just stick with the ‘70s and 80’s rifles. Thanks for reading my 2¢ worth.
 

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Sent my Remlin off to Ranger Point Precision for a shortening after it became apparent that Remington wasn't going to make good on an obvious front sight canted issue. At least the rear sight dive tail was in alignment with the receiver.

Upon disassembly, I was relieved to hear that there were no cracks to be seen; however, the barrel was so tightly turned into the receiver that they were unable to remove it(!) and were forced to cut the barrel with the receiver still attached. One wonders if this is another contributing factor to the fact that cracks are appearing. Metallurgy and the change in threading from square to pointed (or so I have read) aside, such extreme tightness certainly hints that over-torqued barrels can both crack receivers, or pre-load them to crack with repeated firing. I will be watching mine very closely once I get it back and begin putting lead down range.
 

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with my luck I figured that I had just upscrewed! just traded my cousin a AK for his Remlin/New Haven GBL. pulled the forearm today and the ugly machining is there but no crack. I really wanted this one to be good, because it shoots primo.
next I will have pull down my 2000 GG and look . Bicycle fork Metal Steel Rim Bicycle frame
Metal
Nut Pipe Metal
 

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I dunno, deerstalkert, it looks very much the same as the pictures in the thread that gave rise to the warning, and they described it more as a void of metal rather than a crack. In your 3rd picture especially, you can see the threads of the barrel because of the grinding they did, which makes that a weak spot. Hopefully others will chime in, but I would at least run it by a gunsmith.
 

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Fortunately I have a JM model 1895 but wanted another 1895 so I bought a Remlin recently.After getting it home,I tried in vein to get the forearm off to check for the crack.Nothing would budge and I was in fear of breaking something.So,I just decided to go ahead and clean the bore and chamber,that was when I discovered that half the rifling was shallow or gone and the chamber had deep rings of machine tool gouges all the way around.I could only imagine what the brass would look like after fire forming in that chamber.That rifle went back the next day but it cost me a $40.00 restocking fee of which I disputed to no avail.When you look at these Remlins you can no longer see the American pride in workmanship that was evident in years past.It's all about greed and money and how fast they can make it.
 
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thanks for your comments Darkwater. I just went back through the posts and the upshot is that the little triangle of missing metal is normal. the real problem is with stress crack at this area that was caused by over sized threads/over tightening of the barrel.
I looked on my JM guide gun and it has the little "hole" also. I next looked at my 336 it too has the triangle. I guess it is just a feature of machining in this design.
not real comforting but according to all I can gather not an issue with safety. good shooting. tom
 

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I read these posts and others and just come to the conclusion that I arrived at when I first heard of the buyout,that,barring some miraculous and unlikely business deal,such as. When Harley- Davidson was rebought bby those who truly had an interest and love in the brand,we will probably never see quality in the name again,those with older Marlins should keep them to show what they once stood for....maybe I hope,too bad!
 
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