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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Other than the longer barrel and cut rifling is there anything different about the xlr compared to any other 336 internally?
 

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Not that I am aware of, at least internally.
 

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Just a pre micro grove 336A in stainless/laminate with a CBS.
 

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I will have to check but I don't think all of the XLR models had Ballard rifling. I recall some owners stating that they had MG barrels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just curious as to why they are supposed to be so much more accurate.
 

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Just curious as to why they are supposed to be so much more accurate.
It's an old myth that the Ballard rifling is supposed to be more accurate shooting cast bullets.
 

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The XLR's differ in that most have cut Ballard type rifling, but some of the earlier 35Rem XLR's have Micro Groove rifling.......

The XLR Bolts are fluted, but they are raw metal , NO Nickel plating.....The flutes are purely ornamental......While the newer 336/1895 bolts are Nickel Plated and the older pre '69 bolts are Chrome plated........

308MX, 338MX and 450MX all have V threaded barrels, which is more specific to the caliber than the XLR itself.......30-30 XLR's, 35Rem Xlr's and 45-70 XLR's all have Square threaded Barrels...

Of course the XLR wood is Laminate, as opposed to Walnut or Birch...So the XLR's are a bit heavier in hand.

The XLR Barrels are longer....(24").......To take advantage of the LE ammo, and they do create a different percieved balance of the rifle......But then, my 16.25" 35Rem shoots LE just fine @ about 2100FPS (if you can stand the muzzle blast!).........but I don't see any advantages to the LE over my handloads.....

XLR's are Stainless, so they'll take damp weather better, but they will rust, too..........

XLR's were tested a bit differently, (@ 100 yards indoors) and were held to a spec of 1.5" or less for a 3 shot group, but I can't declare or agree that they are more accurate as a group............

XLR's are nice rifles that elevate the Leveraction to a different level than the more common Blue 336/1895 saddle gun.........

IMO,.........whether the XLR is any better is a personal thing between the rifle and the owner........Mechanically they are no different from Blue rifles.

Tom
 

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Tom, good point on the fluted bolts being "Bare" metal. I never understood why that was done. I do know that they (xlr bolts) will rust pretty dang quick if they aren't protected (clp, etc).
That seems to be common practice with old military bolt action rifles dating from 1900- WWI. It works as a way to keep maintenance up to snuff for GI rifles. If your rifle is not cleaned and maintained the first place you see it is the bolt. My old mosin Nagant will rust at the drop of a hat. Just grease it and maintain it and it will stay shiny.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the info tomray!
 

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Tom, good point on the fluted bolts being "Bare" metal. I never understood why that was done. I do know that they (xlr bolts) will rust pretty dang quick if they aren't protected (clp, etc).
Troy,

That was done because I couldn't convince Marketing to allow another (added) process in achieving the Fluted bolts........I explained the dangers of a raw metal Bolt, but they wanted Black Flutes with no more money spent.

The only two ways to achieve Black Flutes was to Blue the Bolts and then Centerless grind them......OR, Nickel the Bolts and then paint the flutes...............The added process of painting the Flutes was not received well..........It meant added time and money.......

I'll concede, if you keep the bolt well oiled you probably won't have too much trouble with rust.

I just can't accept the raw Bolt on a premimum rifle.

Tom
 

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It's an old myth that the Ballard rifling is supposed to be more accurate shooting cast bullets.
I don't know about shooting cast bullets--I only shoot jacketed stuff. The Ballard rifling and long barrel in my '49 336A might have someting to do with the many types of ammo that rifle likes. The old girl can shoot 170 grain Winchester, Hornady (165 grain), and Remington factory loads under an inch at 100 yards. The point of impact for the three different loads ran about 3/4 inch apart from one another. Never had a Marlin be so un-picky about different ammo brands before. This was my one and only Ballard rifled Marlin. I just got another Ballard Marlin but haven't got to squeeze the trigger yet. I can't wait.
 
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Not to high jack the thread, but for those of you who own a XLR, Extra Long Range, what type of shooting distances and accuracy is achieved? I guess I am asking are you comfortable shooting out to say 250 or 300 yds? More than that? Just curious if this has increased your hunting distance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I shoot out to 250 with the wifes 30-30 with le bullets.
 
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