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One of the cast bullet manufacturers recommends "pre lubing" the bore after cleaning. First I've ever heard of this. Of course he sells something for just that purpose.

Anyone out there pre lube their bores after a thorough cleaning? And what does one use for this purpose?

On the other hand, I was out shooting Sweet Pea this afternoon. At 50 yards, second shot was 1 1/4" below the first, the third was 1 1/2" below the second. Three, four, and five made a cloverleaf. (L to R was less than 1/2 ") Coincidence?
 

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I haven't done it (yet) but I have read articles where they run a patch of lube or even car wax down the bore prior to shooting. I've been meaning to give it a try soon. Possibly get me a little container with some presoaked patches ready to go. Hopefully someone with some first hand knowledge will respond. I'm interested to know also.
 

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Don't know about Sweet Pea but I always used Thompson Center bullet lube in my 54 cal. Renegade so it would have some protection after the soap and water cleanup. I also thought it would help in loading the next round. Don't know whether it would be beneficial other than protecting the bore while idle.

Mop
 

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El Kabong
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Before and after, Thompson Center's 1000+ bore butter
The flinter, buffalo classic, and 1895 when it fancies me shooting holy black out of it.
Makes cleaning stupid easy.
 

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For me it depends on how long it will be until I will be shooting the rifle again. I always oil the bore for over winter storage. I will pre-lube with bore butter right before a match but not right after I clean the rifle. Clean barrels shoot different than those with a few shots through them. I have not noticed that the bore butter has changed that, it still takes a few shots to settle the barrel.
 

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My target shooting is with jacketed bullets in Oz and we "pre lube" after cleaning, to reduce the amount of elevation in our 2 sighting shots. If the sighters are centrals then that is a couple of shots you don't have to fire for record. Ballistol works for me. Thoroughly clean the chamber and push a patch or two through the bore.
YMMV:biggrin:
 

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Just got done watching Sgt. York-------one of the new recruits left the grease in the bore of his new 06, "so the bullet would come out faster"----his sgt. didn't see the humor

hopes this helps :biggrin:
 

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I clean and lube my bore at the same time when cleaning. I use Ed's Red. I use this alone with Cast Bullets but if Jacketed Bullets are used then I will use Sweets first to clean the bore of Copper and then continue to clean With Ed's Red. I would like to add that I have a container just large enough to hold the lever and the other parts I removed for cleaning the barrel. I drop those parts in the container and put just enough Ed's Red to cover them and let them soak while cleaning the bore. After the bore is done I use a handy dandy tooth brush to clean the parts then use a rag or paper towels to remove excess then reassemble the Firearm. :)

1 Part Dextron II or III

1 Part Kerosene

1 Part Mineral Spirits

1 Part Acetone

And mix in about 1 LB of Lanolin

The Lanolin helps with Rust Protection and will continue to help keep rust away in storage for upwards of 2 years. And I will use Mobil 1 Moly EP #3.Grease on wear points such as the Lever and Rail's.

If I feel I will shoot the Firearm pretty soon then I will clean as above but have Ed's Red mixed without the addition of the Lanolin.

Just before going to shoot I will run 1 Dry Patch through the bore.


I could wright an entire page on this subject and not be done. I mean heck there are books on the subject lol.

But Bore Condition is different between Cast Bullets and Jacketed and how they should be treated along with the conditions of where one might shoot in the case of Cast Bullets and the lube selected.
 

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Whatever happened to fouling shots? I can't see the point in buying yet another wonder product when all I have to do is fire a few shots and baptize the bore to the load I'm using. The first shot nearly always goes high, and as the barrel settles/fouls in, the shots become more and more consistent. I don't have horrendous humidity problems like some folks, and my guns are kept in low-humidity environments 99% of the time, except when shooting.

This 1894C target is typical.......the first shot at 100 yards was a little high, the next three were consistent, and either a wind gust or the dumbass shooter (that would be me) pulled the last one right. This rifle settles down pretty quickly because I always shoot the same load through it. Some of my other guns take a dozen shots or more before they settle down.



I'd have VERY little faith in a cold shot from a rifle with "something" in the barrel. Odds are the second shot would not follow the first very closely.
 

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That is probably the hardest thing to do is find a combination that will give good results from a clean cold bore.

I shoot mainly cast in my Marlins and for lube I use lube by White Label Lube LsStuff LsStuff-White Label Lube - Cast Bullet Lube For my Climate in South Texas I chose BAC lube. Carnauba Red is a good lube in the summer but it needs heat to flow well where as BAC does not. Plus due to the Heat Swings in South Texas of lets say 100+ in the summer with High Humidity and in the Winter to the low 30's Carnauba Red would have a definite change of first shot between Summer and Winter since it is a hard lube. Which means in the Summer it would not be very hard if any because of the heat but in the winter would get very hard. While BAC Lube showed much less deviation of accuracy between Summer and Winter. Or at least that is what I found with my .357 Mag and 45-70. But it did effect the .357 Mag far more than the 45-70. :)


But I am still like PapaJohn as even though I worked hard to get good accuracy from a Cold Clean bore it will still be off by about 3/4 of an inch at 100 yards of which is ok but not acceptable to me so I will still make sure I have a couple of shots down the bore to settle it just a bit before going hunting. And then will not clean the bore until I am positive that I will not be hunting again for a long while. All I will do is run a clean patch down the bore time to time to remove gravel lol.
 

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El Kabong
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Petrolium based oils and holy black DO NOT mix, they make sludge

Or food grade natural lubes should be used, unless you enjoy cleaning crud out
 

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The last lubes that touch my clean barrels are Ballistol or Aero Kroil, that's with Black Powder or Modern. Bore butter is not a good rust preventive or protectant, been there done that, always allowed rust to form, the way I cleaned, the better made barrels had way less rust, but rust it did.
 
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yes, kroil goes down the bore after cleaning. i shoot a lot of cast and it cuts down on lead in the bore and copper fouling.
 

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.

PJ is absolutely right, fouling shots are needed to get a rifle shooting properly after cleaning. My Marlins require 1 to 5 fouling shots before I can expect any kind of accuracy. Some of my varmint rifle need as many as 10 to 15 fouling shot to settle down after cleaning.

After cleaning I run a patch soaked with Marvel Mystery Oil or Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF) thru the barrel.....good for a year or two storage. A dry patch before shooting takes it out.
 

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I use Shooter's Choice copper fouling remover to clean the bore. I then run a patch or two soaked with alcohol through to remove any traces of oil and then I run a couple of patches treated with Thompson's 1000+. I also use it on shotgun bores as well. In my Trapdoor guns, I only shoot soft cast bullets so the only thing I use is alcohol or Gun Scrubber and then the 1000+.
The best way to cut down on leading is to have a polished bore as a start. When I first get a gun, I run a bunch of patches loaded with a good bore polishing paste. You can even buy bore polishing kits containing bullets impregnated with a polishing compound. An alternative to the kit is to remove the lube from the grooves and fill them with the polishing paste. Cheaper but messier...
 

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PapaJohn pretty much hits it again.

Almost all rifles will not hit the expected point of impact with a clean barrel and especially one which has a added layer of some application.

For years, it has been my practice to foul the barrel of a hunting rifle before the season, then seal the muzzle with a tight layer of electrical tape, one over the bore and one wrap around the barrel to secure the bore sealing layer.

Firing through this tape does not affect the expected point of impact for the simple reason as the tape is gone before the bullet ever reaches it.

My rifle stays in this condition until it is fired unless I happen to be out in soaker conditions or reach the end of the season.

There is a product called "ER" (Energy Release) which you can check out on the net. This IS NOT a Teflon product and rather then coasting the metal, bonds to the pores and into the molecule structure of the metal.

The test data does not address firearm tests, but rather tests done in other mechanical or hydraulic applications

I have heard it said that it improved accuracy. HOWEVER, it would be a treatment applied repeatedly prior to hunting as it bonds into the metal by heat and pressure, and NOT something allowed to coat the bore pre-hunting trip.

I have used some of the "ER" in home brew bullet lube, figuring it could hurt and might even help.

But all that to say this, Papajohn is correct in that a centerfire bore needs to be fouled pre-hunting trip to assure consistent first shot placement.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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Before shooting cowboy matches I often coat the bores of myrevolvers and rifles with a product from Sentry called Smooth Kote. It is a lubricant that dries and is not oily. It further reduces the leading from the cast bullets for me. Just wet a patch and push it through leaving a black coating inside the barrel. Does not attract dust.

I don't know what effect if any it has on accuracy. At the distances of targets in SASS matches it is of no account. I just like that it reduces the lead fouling.
 
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