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Some folks call them half-sour or fermented pickles - which they are.
No vinegar or canning - just brine, spices and a week of time.
Anybody else make 'em?
Easy to make.
I make mine hot enough to light you up - just the way I like them!
We grew everything except for the spices and a few Persian cucumbers that I thought I'd try.


 

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We use to make them and traditional pickles by the quart. That’s when we grew our own cucumbers. Don’t even have a tomatoe plant this year. Still got pickle habit. I have a cheese, cracker and pickle snack almost every night. Store bought pickles now. Pickle crock is now base for table on granddaughters deck.
 

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BubbaJon....got a recipe to share?

redhawk
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
BubbaJon....got a recipe to share?

redhawk
You betcha.
Pickling spice: I make a whole jar so scale you your needs
8 Tbsp black peppercorns (or use white and red if you feel festive)
6 Tbsp yellow mustard seed
2 Tbsp brown mustard seed
8 Tbsp coriander seed
8 Tbsp dill seed
4 Tbsp Allspice berries (not ground)
I grind my own d'Arbol chilies to make my pepper flakes
4 tsp crushed red pepper flakes - more or less you decide.
3 good sized bay leaves crumbled fine
I mix this all in a jar. Shake up when making pickles

Brine: easy - 11 grams of salt per cup of filtered water.
I nuke the water to get it warm enough to dissolve the salt.

I always sterilize the jar in a dishwasher - no need to invite molds and fungus
Always trim each end of the washed cucumber slightly as the flower end has enzymes that can make the pickle soft.
I use about 1 tablespoon of spices per cup of brine. To give you an idea the jar on the left held a little over 3 cups of brine so I used 4 Tbsp. The one on teh right used about 5 cups of brine so it got 5 Tbsp and I ended up adding another because my nose told me it was insufficient after 3 days.
I put the spices in bottom of jar. Pack some fresh dills leaves in be generous I usually use a bunch where the stem bundle is about 1/4" across. Too much won't hurt anything.
Drop in some sliced jalapenos or chili peppers. I usually use one large then a few cayennes - but I like mine hot.
I use about 3-4 big cloves of garlic sliced thin. This makes them Jewish deli style.
pack in the cukes and add brine to cover them.
Now they will eventually soften and start floating to the top. I use a ziplock baggie with water on top to hold the cukes under.
Needless to say you need room to add a baggie with water. I use a jar with a clamping lid (jar on left) and an old large glass jar with lid. Both need to sit on a plate in case they spill over - fermentation can cause the liquid to rise.
Twice a day I rotate the jars to make sure the liquid circulates - I think this helps keep a possibility of mold down and I've never had any.
If you have a clamping lid you need to pop the top every day as it does produce carbon dioxide - I forgot one day and the next day it fizzed like a soft drink ;)
After 5 days - after, not at - you can slice a thick pickle and try it out. It may be a little soft but the ideal is crisp and crunchy. If you taste any cucumber to my mind it's not done yet - give it two more days. After 7-8 days they should be ready to go. At this point I filter the brine into a clean pot, pack the pickles in mason jars and pour the brine back in and pop them in the fridge. They will actually continue to ferment and get even more sour.
Sometimes I add about 1/4 cup of white vinegar to the brine to make them even more puckery.

Y'all try it and let me know what you think. They don't last long around here because I eat the damned things like snack candy when it's the season.
Waaaaay better than store bought.

PS: the brine will get cloudy and you'd swear it's "rurnt" (ruined). That's just the bacteria fermenting the pickles - it's fine. You can see the cloudiness in mine as they are about 3 days old at this point.
 

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Thanks for the recipe! I tried them once years ago and it was a failure lol. I do however do a lot of bread and butter pickles using the cold pack method.
 

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Much appreciated...I did a copy/paste to my recipe folder....

BubbaJon...
[EDIT] Quick Question....you say for a whole jar? What is the size of your Jar....1Qt, 2Qt, 1Gal....5 gal pail?
Also I'm glad to see you specified filtered water...Any chlorine will mess up the ferment....just had to through that in.

redhawk
 
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Super looking pickles, Bubbajon! We've done a couple of jars of
fermented pickles. Lots of dill, lots of garlic. The come out with
the best flavor. Takes some patience, and you have to watch for mold.
We had one batch go bad because we hadn't sterilized the jar well
enough.
One thing we add at the bottom of the jar is a fresh grape leaf.
Helps keep the pickles very crisp.
I planted a Concord vine just to get the leaves for pickling.
Well, I'll make jelly sometime. When I beat the winged hoard
to the fruit.

Thanks for the recipe.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Much appreciated...I did a copy/paste to my recipe folder....

BubbaJon...
[EDIT] Quick Question....you say for a whole jar? What is the size of your Jar....1Qt, 2Qt, 1Gal....5 gal pail?
Also I'm glad to see you specified filtered water...Any chlorine will mess up the ferment....just had to through that in.

redhawk
Well, the "smaller" one on the left is a gallon jar. Not sure the one on the right but likely 1.5 gallons or so.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Super looking pickles, Bubbajon! We've done a couple of jars of
fermented pickles. Lots of dill, lots of garlic. The come out with
the best flavor. Takes some patience, and you have to watch for mold.
We had one batch go bad because we hadn't sterilized the jar well
enough.
One thing we add at the bottom of the jar is a fresh grape leaf.
Helps keep the pickles very crisp.
I planted a Concord vine just to get the leaves for pickling.
Well, I'll make jelly sometime. When I beat the winged hoard
to the fruit.

Thanks for the recipe.
I've heard that about the grape leaves but never tried it.
I tasted one of the Persian cukes tonight and it was softer than the Kirby cukes we grow but still crunchy.
I just picked another jar worth this afternoon so I need to get some dill - lol next year plant more dill...
 

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Well, the "smaller" one on the left is a gallon jar. Not sure the one on the right but likely 1.5 gallons or so.
Oh boy...looks like I'm missing something here...I have no pictures displayed.

Thanx for the information...it looks like others are seeing at least one picture with this post....I have none.

redhawk
 

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Oh boy...looks like I'm missing something here...I have no pictures displayed.

Thanx for the information...it looks like others are seeing at least one picture with this post....I have none.

redhawk
It may be teh link - here's embedded.
CrockPickles.jpg
 

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Just as an FYI I'm not going to repeat the experiment with the Persian cukes. Those are the ones in the right jar.
They taste good just not quite as good as the Kirby cukes and are softer. I tried them because they were inexpensive.
I filtered the brine today - which is day 8 - added 1/2 cup vinegar.
Cut the pickles into spears and packed them in 3 quart jars and added the brine back.
Had to take one for the team and eat 3 since they wouldn't fit ;)
So now they're in the fridge "ageing". Their life expectancy isn't all that long in any case.
We're having a 4th cookout with the neighbors and I'll stick 'em on a plate with a heat warning.
 

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I see the pic now...thanx....they really do look good...I'm gonna give this a try when I can find the time to get them started. I have a 190 year old house with a cellar....it stays in the low to mid 60s down there even in the summer. It's the perfect place to ferment in the summertime. I have to ferment my sauerkraut in the house in the winter months though...it gets down to upper 30s low 40s in the winter so its a bit to chilly to ferment.

Anyway...I'll have to give this one a try....I'm thinking of fermenting them in my 5 liter sauerkraut crock. It has a water mote air lock so it should be self "burping" during the ferment.

redhawk
 
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